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r/i"^'J JAN/I-'JiU ':J7 



(15.50 Cwiti'Ju) fy 15-93 




LA^ER'Fxiim'SDH 



AMIGA 




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- jiJ- iVJQyiii, uusiioroifJlM'J'UiTJDlMj tslk 5h8 REAL aiory for siia fira! Ei/usl 



We |U5f did something only the best can do! 
We made our award winning* software for the 
Commodore ^^ 128 and 64 computers even better! 



Introducing... 

Pocket Writer 2 

word processor 
Pocket Planner 2 

spreodsheet 
Pocket Filer 2 

database 

New Features 

Our new Pocket 2 series offers features usually found only in 
much more sophrsticated applications software. Features that 
include: compatobiilty with the new GEOS operating system t, 
ability to work with the Commodore RAM expander to allow a 
RAM disk, mouse support with pull down menus, 1571 burst 
mode for foster file loading, increased support for two single disk 
drives, automatic configuration for screen color, format and 
printer selectiont. 

Sophisticated software, yes, and still easy to use. You can be 
up and running in under 30 minutes even if you haven't operated 
a computer before. 

2 Programs in 1 

Now, when you upgrade your Commodore^" 64 to a 128, 
Pocket software helps moke it a breeze. The new Pocket 2 
software has both 128 and 64 applications on the same disk. So 
when you buy one you ore actually buying two software 
packages. The cost only $59.95 (U.S.). 

6 Programs in 1 

The 1 80% Solution saves you money! You can buy all three 
Pocket 2 applicotions. Pocket Writer 2, Pocket Planner 2 and 
Pocket Filer 2 in one convenient Superpak for the low price of 
only $99.95 (U.S.). A super woy to discover all the integrated 
features of Pocket 2 softwore and save almost eighty dollars. 

As a companion to Pocket Writer 2, a Dictionary Disk 
containing 32,000 words (expondable to 40,000) is available. 
Thecost $14.95 (U.S.). 

For those of you who have already discovered the many 
benefits of owning Pocket software; we offer all registered 
owners an upgrade to Pockef 2 software for only $19.95 (U.S.) 
plus 3.00 (U.S.) shipping and handlingl Available only by writing 
to Digital Solutions Inc. 



Pack«tWtM«r2 WordPrMesior 
bi oddifign lo Hn new footurai 

abovo«*a 

Spelling Checker incorporated in progrom 

(requires ci dictionary di^k} 
Spelling Checker now rurii over 300% 

foster fhon in original Pockef software 
Word wfop is now fully ciutomotict 
Ability (o move columni 
Go To poge number for binding informo- 

Honinbng texts t 
FuHy automatic upper ond lower <ose type 

conversion t 
Enhanced Delete process for word, line 

Or paragraph 
Word Count feoture for essays and 

Qssignmentst 
Enhonced split memory mail merge option 

Podcttl Planner 2 S|i»ad«h««t 
hi oddHon fo Hmi new fealurtti 
above... 

Individual column width selection now 

ovailoblet 
Multiple filei. in memory with cut and 

paste capability 

Serious Software 
That's Simple to Use 



Able to print mathematlcol formulae os 

well OS results of cakuloftonst 
Global formotling option 
Enhonced row/cofumn insert deletet 
Logarithmic ond XY graphing copobilily 
Increased file compatability with other 

spreodsheetst 
Number of rows increased from 99 
ro250t 

Pock«fFlUr2 Database 
In addition to Hi* new leohirM 
above... 

Oynamrc cotculotions during data entry 
Intelligent re entry to enter/edit mode 
Eosier file converslort from other softwaret 
Automotic index updoting for constantly 

sorted fitet 
Enhanced mothemotkol languoge 

including loops ond labelst 
High speed sort using dyrtomic bufferingt 
Automatic entry of repetotive dot a t 



•Commodore's Microcomputers 
Magozine, independent reviewers, roted 
theoriginol Pocke» Writer t28/64and 
Pocket Planner 126/64 software the 
"Annuel Best of 1986" in the 
productivity category. 

Commodore i^o regtslercu >.uuk...u.r.u. 

Commodore BuiineW Mothinej, Inq. 
tFeafiiires avoiloble for Commodore A4Tm. 
< 19S6 Digilnl Solulinm trn: 



Superpoic: 

Tlie Solurion That 

Saves Money! 




Pocket WritBf 2, Pocket Planner 2 and 

Pocket Filer 2 together 
Convenient; gel all three integrated 

applications at once 
128/64 software on some disks 
Economical; S179.85 (U.S.} worth of 

software for only 

$99.95 (U.S.) 

Pocket Writer 
Dictionary 



Pocket Writer 
I>ictienary 



Mokes Spelling Checker foster and 

simpler to use 
More convenient than developing 

personoldisk 
32,000 wards available 
Expandoble to 40,000 words 



''tiTfci^iwrcSrtdttSTtH;' "-- '- 

Moil Of den: 

Cn'iral CompuFyf fnt. 
in^Aiehiyon 1-517-224-7667 
J ^ideMifliigo'* J HOC "--.^ 



International Disfribufor Enquiries fo; 




Digital 
Solutions 



f/ 1.<. 



2-30 Wertheim Court 
Richmond Hill, Ontario 
Canoda L4B 1B9 
Telephone (416) 731-8775 
Tetex 06-964501 
Fax (416) 731-8915 



uper 





The Best 
Just Gal BeHer 



mf 






Bepn Dunnington 



PUBLISHER, HAHAQINQ EDITOR, 
photos, couei»Sj reyiews, 
production nanaserj tlesisn, 
accountins, leaa voc3.1s. 



Mark K. Broxun 



SENIOR EDITOR^ TECH. EDITOR, 
featni'»eSj reviews^ photos, 
illustrations, trivia, 
backup phones, percussion. 



Tom Mai com 



DATA MANAGER, rewiewSt i-iail, 
ai'chives, special assiffnnents, 
trouble-shooter, keyboards. 



Peggy Herrington 



Associate Editor 



Ted Salamooe 

Contributin.ar Editor 



&m 



Carol Brown 
(319) 338-3620 

(for advertisers ONLY) 



INFO is published bi-nontlily (or 
thereabouts) by INFO Publications 
for Connodore coMPHter enthusiasts. 
CoMModore 64, PET, CBM, VIC, 
ConHodore 128, and Aiiisa ai^e 
tradenarks of Connodore Electronics. 
INFO is not affiliated vfith 
Connodore Electronics Ltd. 



DEALERS : 



If 

INFO in yoLQi store, contact: 

INFO sales at- <319) 338-8978 



wou are interested in cai'irym^ 
in yoLQv stgrej 



READERS : 

Me like to fret yi^i-ii^ letters, and 
do read all nail, 

PLEASE DO NOT PHONE t We have over 
58,880 readers, and only 1 plionet 



Products used to 
produce this issue 
of INFO include; 



INFO READER MAIL 

PO BOX 2388 

IOWA CITY, lA 52244 



copu right tC) by: 
INFU Publications 

all rights reserved 



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video cameras 



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SIgrles Electric Works^ 




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DEPARTMENTS 

11 EDITOR'S PAGE 

Our Views On The Networks 

12 MAGAZINE INDEX 

Options and Opinions by Mark 
14 C64/C128 GAMES GALLERY 

Reviews by Benn, Mark, ii Tom 

22 VENDOR SUPPORT 

From The Horse's Mouth 

23 READER MAIL 

From You, Our Valued Readers 

25 NEWS & VIEWS 

The Latest and The Greatest 

31 NEW PRODUCTS 

What's Hot and What's Not 

43 COPY CORNER 

SuperKit Reviewed by Mark 

45 ON AMIGA 

The Birth Of The Amiga by RJ Mical 

47 SOUND ADVICE 

C64/C128 MIDI by Peggy Herrington 
59 NETWORK WARS 

Cheap Long Distance by Peggy Herrington 

62 DOWN TO BUSINESS 

Focus On Spreadsheets by Ted Salamone 
72 DEALER INDEX 

Where To Buy INFO 
90 AMIGA GAMES GALLERY 

Reviews by Benn, Mark, & Tom 
104 ADVERTISER INDEX 

Please Patronize These Fine Companies 
104 UNCLASSIFIED ADS 

Good Stuff--Cheap Ada 



FEATURES 



40 
53 



57 



C64/C128 HARD DISK DRIVES 

The State Of The Art by Don Romero 
INFO MANIA 

A Free Computer Game With NO TYPING! 

AMIGA MUSIC PROGRAMS 

by Peggy Herrington 





ABOUT THE COVER 

The castle courtyard scene on the cover is 
just one of a multitude of animated medieval 
scenes from the first of a new genre of 
computer games, the interactive movie. 
Defender of the Crown, a Cinemaware title 
from Mindscape, lets you participate in jousts, 
raid the castles of rivals, visit Robin Hood, and 
rescue fair damsels in distress, all to the 
accompaniment of excellent sound and what 
are arguably the best graphics ever produced 
on a personal computer. Judge for yourself 
from the cover photo. The Cinemaware series 
invokes the Mical gaming system, named for 
our newest regular contributor, RJ Mical, 
whose main claim to fame is authorship of the 
Intuition operating system that lies at the heart 
of every Amiga. In his first column for INFO, 
RJ tells the real story behind the creation of 
everyone's favorite personal computer. 

As the cover proclaims, this is a special 
games issue, and the Games Galleries have been 
expanded to fourteen pages for this issue. If 
that's not enough games to hold you, then turn 
to the centerfold and check out INFO Mania, 
INFO'S first free computer game! (We finally 
figured out a way to totally eliminate the 
typing.) Lest you think this issue is all fun 
and games, don't miss Ted's look at 
spreadsheets, Don's C64/C128 hard disk 
roundup, and Peggy's C64/C128 MIDI, and 
Amiga music features. Thanks for reading! 



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use toe brains your 
Commodore wasnt born wite 



Right at Your Fingertips 
in CompuServe's 
Commodore Forums 

Our Commodore Forums involve 
thousands of Commodore users world- 
wide, These forums show you just how 
easy and fun it is to get the most from 
your Commodore Computer. 

The Commodore Communications 
Forum provides the latest news on com- 
munications software and advice on 
effective telecommunications. 

The Commodore Programming 
Forum supports programmers and 
developers of Commodore 8-bit 
computers. 

The Commodore Arts and Games 
Forum is for all Commodore 8-bit 
computers, concentrating on music, 
graphics and games. 

The Commodore Amiga" Forum is 
the national resource for all business 
and entertainment applications in the 
Amiga community. 



Easy access to free software, 
including FREE uploads. 

• Download first-rate, non-commercial user- 
supported software and utility programs. 

• Upload your own programs free of conned 
time charges. 

• Talie advantage of CompuServe's inexpen- 
sive weeknight and weekend rates (wlien 
forums are most active, arid standard online 
ctiarges are just IOC a minute). 

• Go online in most major metropolitan areas 
with a local phone call. 

• Receive a $25.00 Introductory Usage 
Credit when you purchase your CompuServe 
Subscription Kit. 

Information you simply can't find 
anywhere else. 

Use the Forum Message Board to 
exchange mail with fellow members. 
Join ongoing, real-time discussions in a 
Forum Conference — with Commodore 
software publishers, developers and 
technical experts. Scan Forum Data 
Libraries for free software, docu- 
mentation and contributions from 
Commodore enthusiasts. 



Enjoy other useful services, too. LJke 
electronic editions of your favorite maga- 
zines, newsletters and articles, including 
Family Computing, OMNI Online and 
the Electronic Gamer.'" 

All you need is your Commodore 
computer and a modem . . .or almost 
any other personal computer. 

To buy your Subscription Kit, see your 
nearest computer dealer Suggested re- 
tail price is $39.95, To receive our free 
brochure, or to order direct, call 800- 
848-8199 (in Ohio, call 614-457-0802). 
Ifyou're already a CompuServe sub- 
scriber, type GO CBMNET (the Com- 
modore Users Network) at any ! prompt 
to see whatyouVe been missing. 

CompuServe" 

[nlormalion Services, PC Box 20212 

5000 Arlington Centro Blud. Columbus, Ohio 43220 

800-848-8199 

In Ohio, call Gl4-457-a8D2 

An H&R Block Company 

Commodore is a regrstered Iratiamarit ol CommcxJore Eiectfonics Limited 

Amiga is a regislered irademarti of Commodore-Arrega. Irtc 




Ultimate Competition for 1 or 2 players. 

The object Is simple. Race your marble to the goal line, and don't 

let anything get In your way. It sounds easy, but It just might drive you nuts. 



? 


1 


P! 


1 






iiC3^^ llf s.«X/ 


B^^ 


1 




Spectacular Animation 

Fantastic 3-0 terrains are the 

raceways. Zany[but dangerous) 

enemies await your every turn. 

Avoid the deadly steelles and 

the pounding hammers. Watch 

out for the hungry marble 

munchers. Even surf a 

mechanical wave! 



Secret Level 

If you can find It, Just wait till 
you try to get through It! 




ELECTRONIC ARTS" 



Incredible Madness 

Marble Madness, the ultimate 
In exciting non-stop action. 
Each level has Its own "person- 
ality" and creatures to contend 
with, as well as its own orig- 
inal music score. It's not easy 
being a marble - make It to 
the Ultimate Level and you'll 
know why. 



How to ordEn Vlilt your retailer. If you are unable to find the product at your local retailer, you can call 800-245-4525 lor direct VISA or Mastercard 
orden (In CA call SOO-562-1 1T2J. TYie direct price Is S29.9S for the Commodore version. Amiga version rs 549.95. Apple, Atari and IBM versions coming loon. To buy by 

mall, send check or money order to electronic Arts Direct Sales, P.O. Box 7530, San Mateo, CA 9+W3. /^dd SS for shipping and handling )S7 Canadian). Allow 4 weeks for 
delivery. There Is a 14-day, money-back guarantee on direct orders. For a complete product catalog, tend 504 and a stamped, self-addressed envelope to eiearqnlc Arts 
Catalog. IBZO Qateway Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404. Commodore and Amiga are registered trademarks of Commodore Business Machines. Apple Is a registered uademark 

of Apple Computer. IBM Is a registered trademari< of International Business Machines. Inc. Marble Madness' 1984, T9flA Atari Games Corporation and electronic Arts, 

Screen shots represent Commodore 64 version. Ottiers may vary. 
Marble Madn«s Is ■ reglitercd tradenuitc of Atari Games Cerporatlon. 



LOYALTY PAYS 




We at Datasoft recognize the 
value of loya[ customers and 
would like to show you our 
appreciation. Through our Fre- 
quent Purchase Program, you 
can earn credits toward valuable 
gifts everytime you buy a 
Datasoft game. 

That's double earnings, 
because after playing one of 
our games, you won't be 
able to resist what we've 
got in store for you with 
our new line-up of pro- 
ducts! The excitement is 
high at Datasoft with the 
most impressive product line in the histon/ of our 
company! Wb've got something for EVERYONE! 

For all you adventure lovers, we've got challenging 
graphics-text adventures that take you through 
the streets and alley ways of London in 221 B 
Baker Street, to the fantasy world of The Never 
Ending Story, and back to the wild west of 
Gunslinger. 

For our role-playing fanatics, 
Alternate Reality— The City and 
The Dungeon— allow you to get 
away from it all. It'll be hard to 
put the joystick down once you 





■ !TsnDJJ_. .-»■ 




start playing Mercenary, a 
unique adventure and flight 
simulation product in 3D vec- 
tor graphics. 

For the armchair warriors, 

there's no better way to play 

Commander-in-Chief than Theatre 
Europe, a strategy war simulation game 
that puts you on the actual battlefield. 

Get the whole family together to play 
Mind Pursuit and Crosscheck for hours 
of fun for both children and adults. 

Enjoy our games while earning credits 
— at the same time! 
Complete details of our Fre- 
quent Purchase Program are 
enclosed in each game, or call 
us at 818/886-5922 for 
more information about this 
program. 

Double your earnings and fun 

by purchasing 

tiiese Datasoft 

games and see 

how Loyalty 

Pays. 





Dab^oft 



iTM 



Vk Challenge You^ 

19808 Nordhoff Place, Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818) 886-5922 



Mercenary is j trademark; of Novjgen Software Ud. Theatre Europe is a irademarlf of PSS. Mind Pursuit 81 Gunslinger are trademarks of InielliCrMtions, Inc. 

221 B Bakef Streei is s registered trademark of Amler Productions. The NererEnding Story is a trademark of Neuc Constantin Fiimproduktion GmbH. 

Alterraie Rcatrty is ,i rtgisiercd tradonark ot Paradise Progrimming Inc. Crosscheck is a trsdcmarft owned by and used under license from TSR, Inc. 



(Not Bad for a 37-Ton Tank.) 



to 100 MPH In 4 Seconds 

In Antarctica, no one can hear you scream . . . 

You 're caught in a biizzard with your air supply running low. Snowblind, you hear a scream overhead and 

it isn't the wind An alien fighter plane has spotted you and he's got you locked-on. If he's got buddies, 
you could end up Sparri^-ina-can. Uh-oh, your radar picks up incoming fighters, tanks, missiles and rockets. 

Get ready for the fight of your life . . . 



I 




ARCnCFOX 



HAVE YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES? 



TTie guided missile's on-boand camera. 

Perfect for reconnaissance . . . it you've 

got the time for sightseeing. 



CODE NAME: Arcticfox 

MISSION: Infiltrate alien stronghold Search out and 
destroy alien main fortress. Terminate 
alien troops with extreme prejudice. 
PRIMARY ASSAULT VEHICLE: Arcticfox, 37-ton 

advanced all-tenrain vehicle. 
ARMAMENT: 150mm cannon 

2 mine dispensers 
Tunne! series missile-launcher 
Line-of-sight guided missiles 
MAX SPEED: 100 mph 
CREW: 1 

MISSION SUCCESS PROBABILITY: Slim 
MISSION SURVIVAL PROBABIUTY: Worse 




The Main Fortress. If you're 

good enough to r>'>d il, are you bad 

enough to destroy it? 




ELECTRONIC ARTS" 

Houj ta arxlen Visit your relalfer. If you are unable to find the product at your local nialler, you can call 800-245-4525 for dirfct VISA or Maatatard olden 

(In CA call 800-5621 nz). The direct price is 539.95 for the Apple and Amiga versions and t32.95 for the 064/I2B version 

SPAIA is a registered trademark of Ceo. A Home/ & Co. To buy by mail, send check or n7oni!y order to Electronic Arts Direct Sales. P.O. Box 7530. San Mateo, CA 94403. 

Add $5 for shipping and handling (S 7 Canadian). There is a 14. day money-bade guarantee on direct orders. For a complete product catahg. 

sendSOC and a stamped, self, addressed enuetope to: Electronic Arts Catalog, 1B20 Gateujay Drive. San Mateo. Caiifomia, 94404. 




Sixth Sense 64 and Sixth Sense 128 



They answer your phone, make your cads and act on both. 

With Sixth Sense 64 and Sixth Sense 128 your fingers don't do 
the walking, your modem does Ihe ta!l<ing! Comprehensive 
modem control is no longer a mission impossible. The Sixth 
Sense 64 and Sixth Sense 128 modem software understand a 
macro language operating on the time of day. data received, 
internal counters or provided templates. Harness the explosive 
capabilities of the Sixth Sense programs to do your next mission 
impossible. 
Sixth Sense 64 

• 700 virtual line screen • 16 macro keys 

• 16 condition strings spot prompt/initiale responses 

• Clock functions key operations/stamp incoming data 

• 160 functions at your fingertips 
Sixth Sense 128 

• 800 line buffer/7,200 lines maximum with expanded RAfil 

• 20 active macros 

• 42 prewired command keys - 10 to wire your way! 

• Line/screen editors • SEARCH/ GOTO commands in buffer 

■ CompuServe "B" and XtvlODEful CRC/Checksum file transfer 
protocol 

• Runs in 80 columns only 



The Kernal 



$49.95 



Hot out of the programmer^ hands... the Kernal available now 
for Commodore 64 s! 

Commodore users can now use the SUPERDOS fastfoader, the 
DOS wedge and enjoy a built-in freeze/exit function for the first 
time. Experience the ultimate! 

The Kernal is 100% Commodore compatible with easy access! 
It includes a SUPERDOS fastloader in mode files that's 15 times 
faster than normal. The Kernal's DOS wedge disables wedge 
commands and drive rattle. Its un-new function restores basic 
program after a new command. 

The amazing freeze function allows exit 1o basic and then a 
return. Imagine a hardware reset that doesn't destroy data. The 
Kernal even loads (VIL or binary programs from the disk. All of 
this and more happens when you use the Kernal! 



Superkit 1541 

version 2.0 by tvlarty Franz & Joe Peter 

SINGLE NORMAL COPIER - Copies a disk with no errors in 1 
minute. Corrects all disk errors. 

DUAL NORlylAL COPIER - Copies a disk in 33 seconds with a 
graphic/music display while working. 

SINGLE NIBBLER - Nibble copies a protected disk in 1 minute. 
DUAL NIBBLER • Mibbles a disk in 30 seconds and has a 
graphic/music display while working. It's capable of copying 
elongated headers, extra sectors and non-standard GCf^, 
FILE COPIER - Full screen display including buffer, starting 
track & sector, file being copied and revives deleted/corrupted 
files. 

TRACK & SECTOR EDITOR - Capable of reading to track 40 

and examines data under errors. Full editing capabilities in 

HEX, ASCII or text. An f^L monitor is built-in. 

QCR EDITOR - Allows examination of a disk in its raw format 

including the header, density, sync marks and non-standard 

GCR bytes, 't'ou can even examine a full track at a time. It's a 

great way to learn disk protection methods' 

SUPER NIBBLER - The most powerful nibble available. It even 

detects and duplicates density changes automatically 

DISK SURGEON -This is what a parameter should be! It 

copies and places parameters on the disk. f^Jow, over 400 

parameters are included. 

SUPER SCAN - Gives a video or printer display of errors and 

density on a disk in under 35 seconds. 

SUPER DOS FAST LOADER - Loads 150 blocks in 10 seconds. 

It also includes an Auto-Boot maker. 

All programs work with 1541/1571 single side drives made. All of 

the copiers are the fastest on the market and include directory 

options. The File Copier. Track & Sector Editor, Super Nibbler 

and Disk Surgeon use 1 or 2 drives and include device number 

change. All programs re-boot to main menu. SUPERKIT has an 

easy to use menu-driven operation! Version updates are $10. 

Parameter updates are $6. 



$29.95 



$29.95 



Plus $3.00 Shipping/Handling Charge - $5 00 CO.D. Charge 
All of these programs come on a double-sided disk. 



^ \^ 401 Lake Air Drive, Suite D Waco, Texas 76710 

PRISM^^^ Orders/Tech Help (817) 751 -0200 

^^^ Dealers and distributors are welcome. 

MASTERCARD A VISA ACCEPTED 



SUPERXIT 1541 is (or archival use onlyl We do not condone nor encourage piracy of any kind. 



the 



lilTfOiai 





SYSOP COMPENSATION 

There are a lot of misconceptions about how 
the networks work. 

In the November Compute! Arlan Levitan 
made a comment in his Telecomputing Today 
column concerning "...a lucrative sysop position 
on CompuServe..." Though he withdrew the 
comment in his December column, I think it 
accurately reflects a general misconception 
about the way the networks operate. (And he's 
a telecommunications expert!) 

Most nets compensate their system operators, 
or sysops, with free connect time. That's it. 
Some reportedly also offer a percentage of 
connect time charges from those who access the 
area the sysop maintains, though I've never 
spoken to a sysop online who's had that kind 
of a deal. But in any event, the compensation 
is never equivalent to the amount of work that 
goes into maintaining an area on a major 
network. 

The sysop's duties include policing the 
messages users upload for accuracy and illegal 
or immoral content, maintaining the download 
databases, scheduling online conferences and 
conference guests, maintaining and continually 
updating the message boards, posting bulletins 
about activities and system changes, spending 
time online for users to chat with, and 
maintaining user membership rolls. That takes 
an incredible amount of time. Needless to say, 
those who take on the job of system operator 
do so at great personal cost. Their 
compensation is minimal compared to their 
efforts. It is a labor of love. 

Is that fair? In a recent late-night 
conversation with one sysop on a major 
network, he revealed to me that his online area 
was the top connect-time moneymaker for that 
network. His compensation was free connect 
time. Is it fair for a company which is in 
business to make money to expect people to 
maintain their system for them essentially for 
free ? I think not. The time has come for the 
networks to realize this: Without the sysops to 
provide the otiline information, network users 
would be stuck staring at a blank screen. How 
much online time do you think they could sell 
for a blank screen? 



Perhaps some of the blame can be placed on 
the naivete of computer users. We love this 
hobby, and I'm sure that the chance to run a 
user area on a major network is a big personal 
thrill. However, the networks do not provide 
these services out of the goodness of their 
hearts. They arc in business to make money. 
And if they can get someone to maintain their 
system for them for free, they make more 
money. Lots of it. We estimate that just one 
major network is pulling in at least $600,000 a 
month from Commodore users, and The Source 
made a profit of $13 million last year. Others 
did even better. 

The time has come for the networks to get 
honest and start compensating those who do the 
work of making the networks worth signing 
onto. If you are a regular user of the nets, 
we'd encourage you to leave a message online 
to the management of the system, telling them 
you'd like to sec them start paying their sysops. 
They're worth it. 

UPLOAD POLICIES 

A corollary to the sysop compensation 
question is the upload policy of the networks. 
Until recently, users were actually charged 
connect time to upload programs which then 
became an asset to the network. GEnie 
changed all that this year by making upload 
time free, and the other nets followed suit. 

But, wait a minute! That just means that it 
now doesn't cost you anything to upload stuff 
that then makes money for the network when 
people pay connect time to download it. They 
are still not paying anything for what they are 
getting. 

We'd suggest that the nets adopt a method of 
compensating users for uploaded software. 
Maybe they could offer an additional free 
minute of connect time for every minute spent 
uploading software. Or better yet, how about 
crediting the contributor with a percentage of 
the revenues generated by the actual amount of 
access his uploaded program generates? That 
would really stimulate the development of the 
online software databases! 



m 



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ONLINE COPYRIGHTS 

Then, of course, there is the controversy over 
CompuServe's claim of copyright over every 
character of data stored on its system. They 
claim the right to absolutely restrict the 
distribution of software downloaded from 
CompuServe, with the argument that it may 
have been in the public domain before it was 
uploaded, but as soon as it is in the CIS 
computer it is copyrighted by CompuServe. 

Needless to say, this policy has taken a lot of 
public domain software authors by surprise, 
finding out that CompuServe now claims to 
own the copyright to their work. 

CompuServe makes some convoluted claim 
that this actually "protects" the authors and 
"promotes" the distribution of the software. 
It's all doubletalk, of course. The bottom line 
is that CompuServe wants to make even more 
money by charging people connect time to 
download software that CompuServe didn't pay 
anybody for in the first place. It's the old 
"How to Charge People For Air" ploy. We 
don't buy it. Do you? 




...INFO'S guide to the best from the rest. 

Run magazine began exploiting its most 
popular feature, the Magic column, in the 
October issue by adding another column called 
Mega-Magic. This new column features Magic 
tips that arc too long for a regular listing, 
though at least one of the two initial listings 
was actually a few lines shorter than some of 
the regular Magic items. This issue also 
featured an interview with (actually more of a 
scries of short quotes from) Jim Buiterfield 
For all you C128 CP/M users, the November 
Run had a rundown on public domain CP/M 
programs. The December Run had a version of 
the Run Script wordproccssor for the 128 and 
Run's look at the Spartan. As always, Rev. Jim 
Strasma's Commodore Clinic is worth looking at 
in all. 

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Compute! is keeping itself of marginal 
interest by printing at least one type-in Amiga 
BASIC program in each issue. The October 
issue included Pyramid Power, a Q-Bert clone, 
and Amiga Math Graphics. November had a 
game called Biker Dave. In December the 
offering was Laser Strike^ a Battleship clone 
with a space theme that includes speech and 
stereo sound effects. If you own an Amiga, 
are interested in type-in BASIC games, and can 
afford to buy a magazine with only one or two 
articles that apply to your machine. Compute! 
is your only choice for now. 

Computel's Gazette, on the other hand, has 
provided its usual mix of saccharine reviews 
and undistinguished and unreliable type-in 
programs over the last three months. Anyone 
who has access to public domain software via a 
users' group library or network downloading 
can get identical applications with less effort 
and money involved by either of those methods 
than by typing in the Gazette's listings. 

Commodore Power/Play & Microcomputing 
(which merged into Commodore Magazine in 
the January 1987 issue) continues to grow and 
develop. Its type-in programs arc reliably in 
BASIC or BASIC-loader format, so that you 
can learn something from them, and, though 
their reviews are predictably conservative and 
uncontroversial, they definitely has the inside 
track on new information! The 

October/November Power/Play has a strange 
and fascinating article on using a C64 as a 
print buffer for the Amiga (!), as well as an 
article excerpting information from Dan 
Gutman's new book on Weirdware (strange 
applications) for the C64. The October 
Microcomputer is pretty uneventful except for 
a preview of Music Construction Set by Peggy 
Herrington and Louis Sander's Tips & Tricks 
column. The December issue marks the latest 
installment of The Amiga Buyer's Guide, 
Commodore's own picks for the 'best products 
of the year, and Matthew Lccd's picks for some 
of the best Amiga public domain titles. And the 
newly-merged January issue has an amusing 
and insightful look at 1986.- The Year in 
Computers, and the premiere of Robert Baker's 
Q-Link Update column. 

Ahoy! is showing a disturbing trend towards 
printing program listings in hex. You can't 
learn anything from a hex listing. If they are 
going to insist on publishing machine language 
programs, I'd like to see them (and all the 
computer magazines) start publishing the 
listings in standard assembly language. Maybe 
it would inspire computerists to move on up 



from BASIC. Anyway, Dale Rupert and 
Morton Kevelson's articles on programming 
and hardware respectively continue to be the 
main attraction of Ahoy!. Mort digs into R.J. 
Brachman's Serial Box and Xctec's Printer 
Enhancer in the November issue. In the 
December issue Ahoy! got all worked up 
editorially over the fact that INFO once again 
rated them above the other Commodore 
magazines (Product RoundUp, issue #12), and 
consequently said some nice stuff about us, (I 
wonder how they'll promote it if they ever slip 
to Number Two?) The January 1987 issue has 
more good reviews from Morton and a tutorial 
on the C128's M/L monitor by Rupert. 

Dr. Timothy Lcary's column debuted in the 
October issue of The Guide. (We've thought 
about having Dear Abby write one for INFO 
along more or less the same lines...) Probably 
the strangest single issue of any personal 
computer magazine ever is the November issue 
of The Guide. It's subtitled SEX & 
COMPUTERS: A Special Report. Included are 
reviews of Leather Goddesses of Photos, Strip 
Poker, and IntraCotirse, a discussion of sex 
online, and even a look at how computing 
interferes with one's sex life. It's a fun issue, 
with plenty of junior high sniggers and giggles 
along the way. 

The November/December Amiga World has a 
look at color printers that verifies what we've 
found out in our own tests: color printers 
generally still do a pretty lousy job of color 
printing. If you want to check it out for 
yourself, they printed some nice examples. 
This issue also features the AmigaWorld 
Software Buyer's Guide, a listing of 370-odd 
products for the Amiga. The Jan/Feb '87 issue 
marks Amiga World's first all-Amiga-gcneratcd 
cover. It features a digitized shot of David 
Letterman and a magazine logo and titles all 
done on the Amiga. It's about time! Inside is 
an article on Caligari, an incredible animation 
system, a Hardware Buyer's Guide, and bits on 
BOBs, menus, and what's new in version 1.2 of 
the operating system. Amiga World is 
definitely getting meatier. 

We've finally gotten in the last couple of 
issues of Amazing Computing and they look 
pretty good, to say the least. There are lots of 
fair reviews, tutorials in Forth, C, and BASIC, 
and articles on BOBs, fonts, menus, and other 
goodies in issues #7 and #8. It's still being 
produced on a Macintosh, of all things, but a 
worthwhile publication nonetheless. 

Moving to the more generic computer 
publications, Byte continues its excellent 



coverage of 16/32-bit computing in the October 
issue with a feature on Amiga sound, as well as 
their long-awaited official review of the Amiga 
WOO. (They liked it.) Also in that issue is a 
preview of the Apple IIGS, about which they 
were not so enthusiastic. The November issue 
contains their (positive) review of the Macintosh 
Plus, an interesting look at computing in the 
Soviet Union, and an insightful analysis of 
Manx Aztec C and Lattice C for the Amiga by 
Charlie Heath. December's issue is on graphics, 
and includes an article on Mandelbrots on the 
Amiga, complete with C listing, and Bruce 
Webster talks about some Amiga products. 

The October Computer Shopper contains an 
article in praise of the Ziploc sandwich bag and 
its usefulness to computerists. The November 
issue has an article by Sheldon Leeman entitled 
The Myth of ST Superiority, in which he 
logically and point-by-point counters the 
allegations of Atari enthusiasts about the ST 
and the Amiga. It is "must" reading for any 
Commodore enthusiast. I understand the 
article grew out of an online argument on 
GEnie between Sheldon and Atari's Neil 
Harris, and that some notes about that conflict 
are archived somewhere in the Amiga RT on 
GEnie. 

There is one totally non-Commodore related 
publication that is of interest to Commodore 
enthusiasts only because of who is responsible 
for it. As we mentioned last issue. Atari has 
hired David AM and Elizabeth Deal, the former 
editors of Creative Computing magazine, to 
produce Atari Explorer, their house magazine. 
We picked up the first issue (Sept/Oct) and it 
looks good. The editorial content is solid and 
responsible, and the production is attractive 
and slick. David Ahl's cool, intelligent, 
editorial voice seems to be the only rational 
voice emanating from Atari corporate 
headquarters. If Atari were to shut up and let 
Ahl and staff speak for them, Atari would be 
a much more credible opponent for 
Commodore. Fortunately, with the Tramicls at 
Atari's helm that is not likely to happen. 

That's it for this time. Don't forget the 
required reading, too: The Midnite Software 
Gazette for everybody into Commodores, 
Computer Language for programmers, COMAL 
Today for COMAL enthusiasts, The Transactor 
for Commodore techies. Ami Project for Amiga 
programmers, and Seventeen if you're a girl in 
junior high. 




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ARCTIC FOX (64) 
Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404 



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Arctic Fox is one of the first titles 
which has been converted from the 
AMIGA to the 64 (!). Those who take 
the controls of this lethal 100 MPH 
super-tank will be treated to some great 
3-D graphics, plenty of gadgetry, and 
all tne heat a joystick jockey can 
handle! You must face and defeat a 
wide variety of foes on the ground and 
in the air. Gamers will appreciate the 
intuitive control interface, which is 
easy to master, but gives tight control 
over numerous real-time tasks. I 
especially like the missile control "flight 
simulator" -BD 



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GUNSHIP 

MicroProae 

120 Lakefront Drive 

Hunt Valley, MD 21030 



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Almost 2 years since I first heard of 
Gimship, the product is finally shipping. 
Was it worth the wait? You bet! This 
is, without qualification, the best 
combat flight simulation ever released 
for an 8-bit computer! WOW! solid- 
modelled terrain graphics, incredible 
weapons and targeting systems 
implementation, good sound effects, 
and convincing pTiysics. Controls are 
smooth and easy to learn without 
sacrificing realism. The manual is also 
a masterpiece, with detailed illustrations 
and excellent discussions of helicopter 
theory and tactics. PRIME! -BD 



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SHADOWFIRE 

Mindacape 

3444 Dundee Road 

Northbrook, IL 60062 



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Shadow/ire is a very stylish import with 
an emphasis on graphic gadgetry and 
special effects. Play is entirely icon- 
controlled with support for light-pen, 
keyboard, or joysticks. You have 100 
minutes of real-time to equip your 
attack team, beam aboard the captive 
skyfortress, free the ambassador and 
locate the secret plans. Character 
movement via icons gets tiresome after 
the first 20 minutes, but the displays 
are great and include scrolling plan 
views of your team, & status readouts 
on each member. An unusual and 
entertaining space-opera offering. -BD 



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MOEBIUS 

Origin Syatema 
340 Harvey Rd. 
Manchester NH 03103 



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This ambitious game takes up both 
sides of two disks. There are many 
sequences involved in the gameplay, 
from karate and swordfights to good 
or graphic adventuring. Unfortunately, 
Moebius suffers heavily from Apple 
conversionitis, with blocky graphics, 
jerky animation, and a clumsy 
keyboard user interface. One of the 
major amusements of Moebius is the 
old wizard himself, who bears a strong 
resemblance to Steve Wozniak, the 
creator of the Apple II. If you can get 
past the look, it has a decent storyline 
and the action is challenging. -MB 



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BATTLE COMMAND 
Applied Computer Consultants 
Pentagon Tower Box 36186 
Edina MN 55435 



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This game is living proof that you 
don't have to be a giant company to 
produce a good game. This is a fun, 
easy-to-learn battle simulation game 
with limited graphics and sound. The 
game is reminiscent of Battleship or 
Stratego, but more complex. You wage 
war with tanks, field artillery, 
infantry, machine guns, etc. There are 
even gunboats and spies! The main 
attraction of Battle Command, though, 
is its two-player-via-modem mode, 
which lets you play all night via the 
phonelineSj passing nasty messages 
back and forth. What fun! -MB 



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OGRE 

Origin Systems 
340 Harvey Rd. 
Manchester NH 03103 



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An Ogre is a cybernetic tank with 
more armor and armament than your 
standard army division. In this game 
you defend your command post against 
one of these juggernauts with standard 
armor and infantry. You can play a 2- 
human version, but the real fun is you 
against the computer. The rules to this 
one are easier than most simulations, 
so it might be a good one to pick if 
you've been wanting to break into 
battle simulation games. The graphics 
and sound are limited, but the pull- 
down menus and joystick interface 
make play easy. Very nice. -MB 



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COLOSSUS CHESS IV 

Firebird 
PO Box 49 
Ramsey, NJ 07446 



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Not anywhere near as attractive or 
feature-laden as Chessmaster (pictured 
right), but a darn sight more playable 
thanks to the thoughtful inclusion of 
cursor and joystick options for piece 
movement. Tne features are fairly 
complete: board setup, chess clock, 
forward and backward stepping, 
replays, color selection, 2D & 3D 
displays, mate-solving, & more. 
The biggest problem with Colossus is 
that all these features are accessed thru 
shifted keyboard control sequences 
which are hard to remember and 
difficult to find in the manual. Badly 
in need of a quick-reference card. -BD 



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CHESSMASTER 2000 
Electronic Arts / 

Software Toolworka 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo, CA 94404 



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The 8-bit version of the top-rated 
AMIGA chess game (see page 90) almost 
makes the translation to the 64. While 
sporting most of the same extensive 
playing features (including the 
invaluable 'teaching mode'), one major 
design oversight really spoils the whole 
party for me; the only way to move 
pieces is by tvpinf in the standard 
alsehrajc chess twtatwn fie:E7E5) on the 
dans keyboard! (and you can only get 
the display of coordinates in 2D mo 
What a royal pain in the bit-bucket!!! 
you don't mmd all the typing, you 
might like this program- I don't! -BD 



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VIDEO VEGAS 

Baudville 

1001 Medical Pk. Dr. S.E. 

Grand Rapida, MI 49506 



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Four Vegas-Style casino games: 
Blackjack (one player), Keno, Slots, and 
Draw Poker (simulation of the coin-op 
poker machines). Each of these 
simulations is just barely better than 
what you'd expect to find for free in 
the public domain. The graphics and 
sound effects are ho-hum, and there are 
endless little shortcomings and flaws: 
only 3 reels, 1 play line, and a max bet 
of 3 coins on the slot machine; a 
tedious transfer of funds (one coin at a 
time) at the blackjack table and a card- 
counting tutor which docsn t agree with 
the supplied manual, to name a few.-BD 



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VIDEO POKER &. JACKPOT 

Mastertronic 
7311 B Grove Rd. 
Frederick, MD 21701 



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A lot more fun than the Baudville 
version. Great graphics on the slot 
machine simulator, and realistic sound 
effects on the video poker machine 
bring the player much closer to the real 
thing. The slot machine is an elaborate 
four-reel affair with the "hold & 
shuffle' options more prevalent in 
European casinos (the pay-offs are 
shown in English pounds!), with lots of 
different "fruit". The video poker 
machine is very eood, with the 
convincing sound effects of a typical 
machine in Vegas, & it's only $10! -BD 



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CROSSCHECK 

DataSoft 

1980S Nordhoff Place 

Chatsworth CA 91311 



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This crossword game is for one to four 
players. Your goal is to build a chain 
of words from the center of the 
Crosscheck board to your home base in 
a corner. The gameboard is much 
larger than the screen can show at one 
time, so the screen scrolls to show you 
parts of the board. There are elements 
of Scrabble and crosswords combined 
in this game, and it should have some 
appeal for any word game addict. The 
graphics are not much to speak of, but 
It seems to have a fairly extensive 
word list, and it lets you cheat! -MB 



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SHANGHAI 

Activision 

2350 Bayshore Frontage Rd. 

Mountain View, CA 94043 



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This is a fanatically addictive game. 
You begin with a pile of 144 tiles 
arranged in a sort of pyramid called the 
Dragon. The object of the game is to 
remove all the tiles by pointing an 
arrow at matching pairs with your 
joystick and clicking on them. Strategy 
IS the most important element of the 
game. Pointer movement with the 
joystick is rather awkward and slow 
and the game suffers from hard-to- 
distinguish graphics and unalterable 
screen colors_, but if you can get past 
that, you'll find it hard to quit. [Amiga 
version reviewed on pg. 91] -TM 



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WORLD GAMES 
Epyx 

600 Galveston Drive 
Redwood City, CA 94063 

Summer Games, Winter Games, and now 
World Games. Will we soon see Galactic 
Gamesl WG is my least favorite of the 
series. Slalom Skiing (pictured lefti is 
the best of the eight new events. The 
other seven are: Cliff Diving, Sumo 
wrestling. Bull Riding, Barrel Jumping, 
Log Rolling, Weight Lifting, and the 
Caber Toss (when was the last time you 
paid money to see world-class Log 
Rolling???) Epyx does such a nice, 
consistent job of execution, tho, that 
it's hard to take off too many points 
even for such boring material. -BD 



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INDOOR SPORTS 

Mindscape 

3444 Dundee Road 

Northbrook, IL 60062 



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Here's an unusual and mixed bag of 
computer games: Air Hockey, Darts, 
Bowling, and Ping-Pong! All four of 
these sports are nicely rendered in the 
computer medium by the authors, and 
they are all quite enjoyable (I found 
the air-hockey to be especially fun and 
well-done). AH the games allow player 
vs. player or player vs. computer play. 
The ping-pong game is unique with 
paddles tnat float in the air, and move 
quite articulately in response to your 
joystick. It's unusual titles like this 
that keep us fascinated with computer 
gaming year after year! -BD 



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SPINDIZZY 

Activigion 

2350 Bayshore Frontage Rd 

Mountain View, CA 94043 



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This is a hot little number with much 
of the appeal of Marble Madness, but 
with faster action, more player 
freedom, greater variety of playfields, 
and jewels to hunt for. Yep, it's a 
winner. Guide your spinning 'top' 
(which glides and spins seductively 
across the tiles) from screen to screen, 
and collect all the jewels before time 
runs out. The maze aspect (how do I 
get there from here?) adds still more 
interest and challenge to this game. For 
one player only. Recommended. -BD 



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MARBLE MADNESS (64) 
Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404 



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A noble attempt, but Marble Madness 
for the 64 is just a shadow of the 
arcade original and the excellent Amiga 
version (see pajge 90). I don't know if 
it's a case of just asking the 64 to do 
more than it is capable of, or if the 
programming was not up to EA's usual 
snuff, but ttie end result is a visually 
convincing lanscape with marbles that 
handle like intoxicated turtles. The 
marble noticably oversteers, and then 
(perhaps to compensate) doesn't fall off 
the track until you have gone way over 
the pjerceived edge. Especially 
frustrating with 2 players. -BD 



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ALIENS 

Activition 

2350 Bayshore Frontage Rd 

Mountain View, CA 94043 



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The movie isn't even out on video tape 
yet, but you don't have to wait to see 
Ripley and the gang, 'cause the movie 
has already made the jump to computer 
game! There are six complete game 
sequences in Aliens including 'The Drop 
Ship', 'APC Rescue' (pictured), 
'Operations Room', 'Air Duct Maze*, 
'Newt Rescue', and 'One on One' (where 
you are Ripley strapped into the power 
loader locked in mortal combat with the 
Queen Alien!) The aliens are 
appropriately creepy, and each sequence 
is well done & plays quite differently 
from the others. -BD 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



HACKER II 

Activision 

2360 Bayshore Frontage Rd 

Mountain View, CA 94043 




A superior sequel to the original, and 
very popular. Hacker. Hacker II gets 
very involved with some complex audio- 
visual equipment and the services of a 
remote control robot (by the time you 
have fully mastered the video controls, 
you may find yourself qualified to 
work as a studio engineer for a major 
TV network!) An engrossing and 
challenging espionage game (has the 
flavor of the old Man from U.N.C.L.E. 
and Mission Impossible shows. The 
documentation is fun, and filled with 
all kinds of detailed techno-babbel, 
schematics, etc. -BD 



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HAHIPULATCD INTO HftUIHB SEX MHEK 
THEV Hfl«E TflKEU ft LOT OF ftLCOHOL OR 
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IS AH 0UERHHELHIN6 DESIRE OF ALL 

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PKSBLEH CAN BE HELPED BV LEARHIHB 
TO COHCEHTRftTE BETTER DURIMB SEX. 

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$OMe Mt«rial in this story itay not 
suitable for children, specially 
tiSve parts involwing s«x, which no one 
should know anything about until 
reaching the age of eighteen 
ttw«nty-one in certain states). This 
story is also unsuitable for censors, 
neM>ers of the Herai Hajority, and 
anyone else who thinks that sex is 
dirty rather than fun. 

The attitudes expressed ia\A language 
used m this stopy are representative 
only of the viei^ of the author, and in 
no waj^ represent the «ic«s of InfocoH, 
Inc. or its e>«>li>yees, Ka»y of i*o* are 
rtiidpen, censi>rs, aod Menhers of the 



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WHERE IN THE WORLD IS 

CARMEN SANDIEGO? 

Broderbund 

17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael CA 94903 



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This is a really good educational game. 
You are a famous detective, and one 
of the villains of V.I.L.E. has stolen a 
famous treasure. With the help of the 
onscreen clues and your trusty World 
Almanac and Book df Facts (included) 
you track the culprit around the world. 
Besides teaching you how to use 
reference books, WITWICS will lead 
you to all kinds of interesting 
information about the countries you 
visit, like currency, flags, and 
population, and you'll hardly be aware 
that you've been taught. The graphics 
and gameplay are nice, too. -MB 



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ALTER EGO 

Activision 

2350 Bayehore Frontage Rd. 

Mountain View, CA 94043 



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I really like this unusual and innovative 
'game' which, the not billed as such, is 
some of the most broadly therapeutic 
and consciousness-raising software 
available. Alter Ego is also very 
entertaining. Describe yourself (male 
and female versions are available) to 
the computer, then dive into your 
hypothetical life at any age level from 
infant to codger and play out your 
fantasies, try on new personalities, find 
out what you'd do if... The box 
suggests parental discretion, but I would 
recommend this wholesome software to 
anyone old enough to read.-BD 



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Dr. Ruth's Game of Good Sex 
Avalon Hill 
4517 Harford Road 
Baltimore, MD 21214 



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Now, Fresh from the Donahue show!... 
that dynamic little sex celebrity (who 
can't possibly have time for sex herself) 
has brought her one-person crusade for 
elevated sexual awareness to the 
computing community (the last 
frontier?). There are some very explicit 
multiple-choice questions in a fairly 
standard quiz format allowing up to 
four players to test their knowledge of 
sexual facts (you may be surprised at 
some of the things you didn t know!) 
Very educational, with lots of good 
information. Not for prudes or 6th 
grade boys! -BD 



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LEATHER GODDESSES OF 
PHOBOS 

Infocom 

125 Cambridge Park Dr. 

Cambridge MA 02140 

This sexy spoof of 1930's science 
fiction pulp novels is fun to play, 
though Infocom has produced more 
challenging standard-level text 

adventures. In this one you must 
defeat the evil Leather Goddesses, who 
are bent on sexually enslaving the 
citizens of Earth. There are a lot of 
giggles in this one, and you'll run into 
some real pulp-novel characters and 
cliffhanger situations along the way. 
You won't be offended by Leather 
Goddesses: it has 3 naughtiness levels, 
and even LEWD is pretty tame. (But 
watch the scratch'n'sniff smells!) -MB 



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PORTAL 

Activision 

PO Box 7287 

Mountain View CA 94043 



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You've gone on a space mission and 
return to a deserted Earth! You 
discover a computer terminal linked 
into the barely-functioning worldwide 
database. With the help of an artificial 
intelligence, you try to piece together 
what happened to the people of Earth. 
This is an engrossing, fascinating, and 
somewhat disturbing program. It s like 
a murder mystery, an expedition, and 
having amnesia all rolled into one. The 
graphics are minimal but good, the text 
IS excellent, and the icon-and-joystick 
interface is well done. Portal takes up 
5 sides of 3 disks. -MB 



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ROBOT RASCALS 

Electronic Arts/Ozark Softscape 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo CA 94404 



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This is a cute game for two to four 
players that conibines a card game and 
a computer game, which makes it to 
our knowledge the first "family" 
computer game (in the same sense as a 
family board game). The computer part 
of Rascals is a nice remote-controlled- 
robot scavenger hunt. The music, sound 
effects, and graphics are very good, 
and the robots are well-animated and 
endearing. The cards have the same 
feel as UNO, with lots of card 
swapping. If you've been looking for a 
computer game the whole family can 
play, this one deserves a look. -MB 



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This is the first installment of a new feature 
which we hope will expand and become a 
regular part of INFO, VENDORS' TECH 
NOTES will contain useful and timely 
information on popular products of the day 
which by their nature require and merit ongoing 
support from the manufacturers. In this column, 
however, most of the information will be written 
by the programmers and technicians themselves, 
rather than by INFO staff. We hope this direct 
approach will create and stimulate a direct line 
of communication between consumers and 
vendors, and help spread vital information to a 
large number of users. 

We will be starting out with products from Aegis 
Development. Electronic Arts' Deluxe series, and 
by next issue, hope to ad segments on 
SuperBase, and other productivity titles as well. 

If you have any questions you would like 
answered by a major product vendor for 
suggestions for other products needing this type 
of forum), please send vour question to: INFO 
TECH NOTES. PO Box 2300. Iowa City, lA 
52244, and we will forward the most pressing 
and most interesting questions to the appropriate 
persons for a publishable response. 



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MAKING AEGIS DRAW METRIC 

Aegis Draw is currently based on the 
English measurement system. All scales are 
expressed in a "units per inch" system. Draw 
does not assume that the drawing units arc 
based on an English measurement system, but 
does assume that the plotter is using English 
units. 

This is simple to change. Refer to 
Appendix E of inside Aegis Draw. The 
PlotDriver file provides the information Draw 
needs to "talk" to the plotter. This file can be 
altered to create a version of Draw that 
provides metric .scaling. 

The pages of Inside Aegis Draw you need 
to lool< at arc E-3 and E-4. The values in 
PlotDriver that refer to inches are: 



Resolution, the number of plotter units per 

inch. 

Width, the width of the plotting surface in 

inches. 

Height, the height of the plotting surface 

in inches. 

Thickness, the thickness of the pen in 

inches. 

These are all "real numbers." 

If you wanted to use a metric unit for 
scaling, for example millimeters (mm), you 
could express these values in terms of mm. 
For example: 

Resolution, the number of plotter units per 

mm. 

Width, the width of the plotting surface in 

mm. 

Height, the height of the plotting surface 

in mm. 

Thickness, the thickness of the pen in mm. 

When Draw used this plotdriver file, the 
scale (Options Menu, format Item) would be 
the number of Draw units per mm on the 
plotter." then you could use a decimal ruler 
(Option Menu, Units Item). If you need to 
express this in centimeters (cm), just state the 
values in terms of cm. Draw has been 
"fooled" into being a metric CAD system 




ELECTRONIC ARTS 
Most Commonly Asked Questions 



Why can't I load some of my Instant Music 
instruments into DeluxeVideo? 

DeluxeVideo only allows instruments that 
are 24K or less in size, and some of the 
Instant Music instruments are larger than that. 
To find out the size of the instrument, use the 
Info feature in Workbench to check the size 
of the instrument. Alternately, you can just 
substitute instruments that you know will 
work for an instrument that doesn't. For 
more information on how instruments work in 
DeluxeVideo, see Appendix B of your Deluxe 
Video manual. 

Re-printed with permission from Deluxe News copyright 
1986, Electronic Arts, Inc. 








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INFO ONLINE ON PEOPLELINK, PLAYNET 

INFO has added two new electronic mailboxes, 
so if you're a regular on PlayNet or 
PeopIeLink you can now send us mail as 
conveniently as subscribers to QuantunaLlnk, 
BIX, CompuServe, and the folks who still trust 
their mail to the rusty (oops! I mean trusty) 
U.S. Postal Service. Send your comments, 
questions, kudos, and complaints to: 

INFO Magazine, PC Box 2300, Iowa City lA 



52244 



CompuServe 
QuantumLink 
BIX 
PeopIeLink 

PlayNet 



INFO 70215,1034 
INFO Mag 
infomag 
INFO Mag 
Ben D 



COMPUSERVE 

Date: 16-Nov-86 19:56 CST 
From: Ed Corey [74276,1267] 
Subj: 1571 ROM BUGS 

I have always respected your magazine, 
but I have looked in vain in the last 
several issues for some type of comment 
about the severe ROM bugs in the 1571 
disk drive. This flawed piece of 
equipment has gone far too long without 
being corrected, and we owners are the 
victim. Why have you not reported on 
this problem? 

It's true that there are some bugs in the 1571. 
but we haven't seen more or less than in most 
other computer equipment. The most serious bug 
seems to be a problem with files that wrap from 
one side of the disk to the other (though I've 
never personally experienced it). The 1541 mode 
is also somewhat less than 100% 1541- 
compatible, and experiences problems when 
loading some heavily copy-protected software. 
But aside from these problems, the 1571 is in our 
humble opinion probably one of the finest pieces 
of hardware Commodore has ever produced. We 
put ours to the test every day. using them for 
everything from booting software for review to 
backing up data disks to actually storing all the 
text for the magazine. The 1571 is fast, 
reliable. and extremely versatile. It is 
programmable and can read many different disk 
formats including CP/M and, with the right 
program. IBM/PC files. There is no way that 
we could agree with the assertion that the 1571 
has "severe" bugs or thai it is a "flawed piece of 
equipment". -Mark <£ Benn 



Date: 15-Nov-86 15:12 CST 
From: Brian Barrett [71350,3271] 
Subj: 64 Terminals 

I just purchased a modem and I'm 
stuck with a cheesy terminal program. 
Why don't you make yourself useful and 
do a report on telecommunications? I 
am positive that you'll make the article 
informative and entertaining (as usual). 

The latest updates on telecommunications 
hardware and software will be included in our 
next issue, which already promises to be our 
biggest Product Roundup Issue ever! And for 
regular coverage of the telecommunications scene. 
check out Peggy Herringlon's Network Wars 
columns. -Mark & Benn 

QUANTUMLiNK 

Mail From: Big Redl 

Date: Wednesday 19-Nov-86 18:04 est 

Congratulations on another excellent 
issue (#12)! I have two 

questions/comments: First, what is the 
usual lag time between when an article 
is written and when the issue hits the 
stands?; Second, some of your articles 
and reviews don't tell us who they were 
written by (for example, who did the 
GEOS review?) Come on guys: Give 
credit where credit is due! (and you 
people deserve a lot of it.) Keep up the 
great work! 

// usually takes about three weeks or so between 
sending our copy to the printer and the first 
issues showing up on the stands. Our direct 
dealers (listed in every issue) are the first to 
receive copies. 

As far as credit for uncredited articles goes, if 
it's not signed then either Benn or I wrote it. We 
figured you'd get tired of reading them if we 
credited every article to ourselves! -!^ark & Benn 

Mail From: GDL 

Date: Monday lO-Nov-86 21:29 est 

Hi INFO! You guys are the BEST! It 

usually takes me about 10 minutes to 

flip through any of the other C= mags, 

but INFO keeps me busy for weeks. I 

can't wait for the next issue! Keep up 

the great work. 

Thanks, GDL. for supplying us with our 
obligatory Reader Mail "INFO is GREAT!" 
letter. We appreciate it! -Mark & Benn 



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Dear INFO, 

I am writing to you so that I can get 
some facts cleared up about copy 
protection. First off, I used to think 
that the reason the software publishers 
put copy protection on their disks was to 
prevent you from making unnecessary 
copies of their software. Some of these 
titles, however, won't even load on third 
party drives. I think that these titles 
should not be purchased by the 
consumer. I recently bought a program 
for the 64 that will not load on my 
Enhancer 2000 disk drive, so I bought a 
$39.95 copier. This nibble copier zapped 
through this particular disk's copy 
protection like it wasn't even there! In 
fact, this particular nibbler, along with 
a half a dozen more, will copy virtually 
anything you put in front of them. So, 
my question to you is: why is the copy 
protection going so far? What good is a 
program if it won't load on your disk 
drive, but you can still make an 
unlimited number of backups of it? 

Travis Moore 
Jonesboro AR 

Good point, Travis, and one we've been making 
for a long lime. Copy protection makes it 
harder for the legitimate purchaser of a program 
to use that program, and very often does not stop 
the illegitimate copying it was intended to 
prevent. Some software publishers are waking 
up to this fact, and have begun removing the 
protection from their programs. Let's hope this 
trend continues. -Mark & Benn. 

Mail From: Icarus 

Date: Wednesday 19-Nov-86 21:59 est 

I just got Superscript 64 and have 
spent this whole day trying to get my 
Okidata 92 with Tymac Connection 
installed. I'm still getting black boxes 
between words in underline. Only 
decimal 49 and 48 (nlq on and off) seem 
to get through. Ted Salamone raves 
about the printer drivers supplied for 
the program in his review in Issue #12. 
Did he actually TRY any of them? I am 
no novice. If I can't do it, I wonder 
how the neophyte would make out? 
Anyway, I always look forward to 
INFO. When I get my Amiga, that will 
still be the case. 



Obviously there is no way we can test a 
program with all the listed drivers on all 
printers and interfaces. For some programs, that 
would involve hundreds of hours of work. We 
usually try some of the more common setups and 
have to assume that the others work. Our only 
basis for comparison in those instances is 
whether or not a given program seems to provide 
drivers for a good variety of printers and 
interfaces. But we really have no way to know 
whether or not any one specific setup is going to 
work properly. -Mark & Benn 



Dear INFO, 

I enjoyed the copy of INFO #9 
containing the "ad" comparing the C128 
to the 520ST. Although I'm not very 
computer literate, I was able to enjoy 
the sarcasm of your "ad" since it more 
readily revealed the old adage: "figures 
don't lie, but liars can figure". I 
understand clearly now that Atari's ST 
vs. Amiga ad was another one of those 
"apples vs. oranges" situations. Your "ad 
vs. ad" approach was quite clever and 
made your point much clearer. 

I do have one question I'd like 
answered, though. Your attitude 
towards Atari (Jack Tramiel) seems to be 
one of enmity. It's my understanding 
that Commodore "won" the computer 
war under his leadership and he was 
later ousted. I am not arguing with 
your opinion, just seeking an 
understanding of its cause. 

Les Horelica 
Houston TX 

You know, Les, sometimes even we wonder how 
we really feel about Jack Tramiel. After all. 
like you say, he did bring us the Commodore 64 
at a great price and led Commodore to the 
fronlrunning position in the Home Computer 
Wars. He's an agressive marketer and has 
managed to do much more than just keep Atari 
afloat, he's managed to whip them up into being 
a real contender in the market. 

On the other hand, we have traced many false 
rumors about the Amiga back to sources at 
Tramiel's Atari, and he continues to pass a line 
to the press that your innocent old grandmother 
wouldn't buy. Yet a surprising number of 
computer Journalists report what Atari tells them 
as the gospel truth, much to the detriment of the 
computing public, and to Commodore. 

We have nothing against Jack Tramiel 
personally. He's a fighter and a hard hitter, and 
he's proved that all the way from Nazi 
concentration camps to corporate offices. We 
have a great deal of respect for a man who can 
live through all that. But we don't have to like 
how he does business. -Mark & Benn. 




24 1 



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BUGS 

Well, this is why wc don't generally print 
type-in programs: It has come to our attention 
that the INFO Lottery program wc printed last 
issue (INFO #12, p. 59) has a few lines that 
could cause problems. We foolishly used "L" as 
a variable; it was accidently printed in 
lowercase in lines 50-70, and the lowercase "1" 
in this LaserJet font looks just like the number 
"1". So if you actually typed the program in, 
and it doesn't work, check out those lines. 
Also, in line 320 and 340 some quotation marks 
got dropped in A$= comparisons. The first 
should say A$="" and the second A$="R". And 
this program was only 34 lines long! I don't 
see how Computel's Gazette ever manages to 
print a program that works! 

BIG BUCKS FOR INFORMATION 

There is a plethora of computer industry 
"insiders newsletters" on the market now. Most 
arc small biweekly quick-printed sheets with 
anywhere from four to sixteen pages. They 
cost a lot. The Information Industry Bulletin, 
for example, is a six-page weekly that costs 
$200 a year. The most prestigious of the lot, 
Stuart Alsop's P.C. Letter (which includes his 
infamous Vaporware List), comes out almost 
biweekly (22 issues annually) and costs a 
whopping $345 a year. Just thought you'd like 
to know what a great bargain you're getting in 
INFO. 

SF COMMODORE SHOW IS GO 

We were initially told that the Commodore 
computer show in San Francisco had been 
cancelled, but it is now on again. It will take 
place February 20-21-22 in Brooks Hall. The 
show runs from 10 am to 6 pm on Friday and 
Saturday, and from noon to 5 pm on Sunday. 
There will be the usual mix of frce-with- 
admission speakers and exhibits by Commodore 
vendors. Admission is SIO per day or SI5 for 
the whole show. For more INFO, call 1-800- 
722-7927. 

THE WRITING ON THE WALL 

With a view to the future, the Pilot Pen 
Company has announced that it will begin 
selling a complete line of printer ribbons 
through its established group of office supply 
stores. (FYI: A pen is a pointed, ink-filled 
instrument once used to create documents 
manually.) 



NEWSROOM GOES PLATINUM 




The Newsroom from Springboard Software 
has become the first software title to receive 
the Software Publishers Association's Certified 
Platinum Award. To go platinum a title must 
sell a quarter of a million copies in all 
formats. 



C= PC/AT CLONE 



Commodore has had a good deal of success 
with its IBM/PC clones in Europe, So much so 
that they arc bringing the PC-10 and PC-20 
into the U.S. market. Now they have 
announced that they will be building yet 
another European PC clone, this one a more 
advanced model that mimics the IBM/PC-AT, 
There are currently no plans to bring this 
model to the U,S. 

MORE C= PROFITS 

Commodore has posted its second consecutive 
quarterly profit. For the quarter ending Sept. 
30, Commodore made a profit of $3.7 million 
on sales of $176 million. With the healthy sales 
we are hearing about, it looks like Commodore 
is back on the track. 

MOS TECHNOLOGY LIVES! 

Commodore stopped sales of semiconductors 
from its MOS Technology Division as part of 
cost-cutting procedures two years ago. Since 
that time they have closed one MOS plant in 
Costa Mesa CA, leaving only a plant in 
Norristown PA, which has been producing 
chips for Commodore's own machines. In a 
recent announcement, Commodore has said that 
it will again begin selling chips to OEM 
developers. All Commodore chips except the 
special Amiga sound and graphics chips will be 
made available to third parties such as toy and 
computer manufacturers. 



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continued 



PIRATE CHALLENGE 

This has been a Thing We'd Like To See for 
a long time: since pirates generally crack copy 
protection just for the fun of it anyway, why 
not come up with a game that is nothing but a 
heavily copy-protected disk? Hide a message 
somewhere deep in the program and award a 
"Cracker's Certificate" to those who make it 
through the layers. Well, Brian Shine Software 
has come up with it. The Pirate Disk has five 
questions hidden deep within layers of copy 
protection. Crack your way through to the 
answers, and they'll give you a free program to 
reward you for your efforts. Best of all, the 
game is only $5.99. Come on all you aspiring 
pirates, leave the commercial stuff alone and 
tackle this programming challenge instead! 
Brian Shine Software, 1410 N. Grand Unit C 
Covina CA 91724. 

BRODERBUND WINS SUIT 

It's no secret that Broderbund filed a suit 
against Unison World some months ago, 
alleging that Unison World's Print Master 
program violated copyrights that Broderbund 
held on its Print Shop program. Even though 
Broderbund never claimed that Print Master 
duplicated the actual coding of Print Shop, 
they claimed that the program copied the "Look 
and Feel" of theirs. The District Court agreed, 
and decided that Unison World would have to 
alter the way the product looks and interfaces 
with the user. 

This decision is significant in that previously 
only video games were considered unique in 
their claims to look and feel. This decision 
could have far-reaching effects for the 
producers of all software, especially 
productivity software which has a great 
tendency to look similar, anyway. 

The court did not issue an injuction against 
Unison World, which will continue to 
distribute a version of the program that has 
been changed to comply with Broderbund's and 
the court's stipulations. A later hearing (over 
by the time you read this) will determine what 
damages, if any, are due to Broderbund. 

Tom Miller of Unison World says the new 
version of Print Master is even better than 
before, and told INFO that he wants to 
reassure his customers and dealers that this 
decision will not adversely effect the product 
or the company. 



INFO Commentary: With more and more 
technical and computer-related issues going to 
the courts, we're going to have to appoint some 
computer-literate judges who can understand the 
issues or we're not going to get reasonable 
decisions. We can't comment on this particular 
case: We don't have all the facts, and the courts 
have spoken. But we have to relate what the 
Judge reportedly said when Broderbund's 
attorneys asked to make their closing statement: 
"Frankly, I'm so confused that I can't even listen 
to a closing statement right now." Enough said. 

FOOT IN MOUTH 

Robert Lock, the Editor-in-Chief of 
Compute!, recently found himself in the 
embarrassing position of having actually 
believed the inflated figures that Atari fed him 
concerning sales of the Atari ST. When they 
issued their public stock offering this fall, 
Atari was required by law to file the true and 
accurate figures with the Securities & 
Exchange Commission, figures which were 
considerably below those that Lock reported. 
In the August Compute!, Lock had asserted in 
his Editor's Notes that "the ST (has) an 
installed base of roughly ten times that of the 
Amiga. Not a very stirring record (for the 
Amiga)." Compute! then found themselves 
desperately trying to defend their position 
against an onslaught of reader protest. In 
October, Lock said "None of (our) concern over 
the lessened acceleration of Amiga sales 
compared to those of the Atari ST reflects a 
lack of respect for the computer." By 
December, Lock and Compute! had had the 
opportunity to see the SEC figures for 
themselves, and still they were defensive of 
their previous stand: "Perhaps earlier estimates 
we had received included machines still in the 
pipeline, or perhaps Atari was simply hopeful. 
In any event, the Atari ST at that time was 
outselling the Amiga, although not by the 
magnitude we then suspected... Maybe we'll have 
to resort to passive vagueness for future 
numeric comparisons." It would have been 
much more courageous to merely admit: "Hey, 
we bought what Tramiel told us hook, line, and 
sinker, gang! Sorry about that! Boy, is there 
egg on our face!" 

By the way, the SEC figures indicated that 
150,000 Atari STs had been sold by June 30. 
The best figures we can dig up would seem to 






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indicate about 100,000 Amigas sold by the same 
date. And consider that the ST had been 
available for six months longer, the Amiga had 
barely begun to sell against the ST in Europe 
by then, and the Amiga is a more expensive 
machine and so generates more income for 
Commodore per sale, and the figures look 
pretty comparable to us. 

INFO ONLINE NEWS 

If you frequent the networks, look for INFO 
online. Though we don't have an area of our 
own set up on any of the networks, we do get 
up on most of them on a regular basis to see 
what's happening and check on our Online 
Reader Mail (see Reader Mail for our Email 
addresses). We'll drop into online conferences 
from time to time to give INFO's Valuable 
Opinion on the topics under discussion, as well 
as actually appearing in the hot seat as the 
Honored Guest for an occasional conference. 
These things usually happen on the spur of the 
moment, or at least with only a couple of 
weeks lead time, so we won't have time to keep 
you up to date in these pages. There's no 
doubt in our minds that INFO will eventually 
have its own area in one of the online services, 
but we won't do it until we've got the 
resources to do it right and make it really 
special. Until then, look for us online! 

COMMODORE STOCK UP 




The price of Commodore stock has risen in 
the past couple of months from a low of S4.75 
a share to between $8 and $9 a share as I write 
this. It looks like Wall Street finally believes 
that Commodore's financial balancing act is 
working. With new arrangements with its 
banks, personnel cutbacks, and inventory 
reductions, Commodore is tough and lean. 
They are up against tough competition, but 
with these changes behind them Commodore 
should be able not only to survive, but to 
thrive. 



BIBLE ON DISK 

In what has to be the most ambitious 
independent project to date on an 8-bit 
Commodore machine, Randall Bernard and a 
group of hearty volunteers (gleaned mostly 
through an item in The Transactor) have typed 
the entire King James Bible onto CBM format 
diskettes. Though the Bible has been available 
before in rather expensive commercial versions 
for Commodore computers, this project makes 
it available for free for the first time. The 
work takes up both sides of fifteen 1541 
format disks, and is available in both standard 
PET ASCII and Speedscript file versions. If 
you are interested in a copy, you can write to; 

Randall J. Bernard 

PO Box 630 

Morenci AZ 85540 
or call (602) 865-3550. He's also available as 
ST BERNARD on QuantumLink. Though he 
hasn't asked for any money, I'm sure a 
donation would help him to defray some of the 
costs of this project. What's next? Randall is 
hopeful that users will begin to develop some 
support programs to help make using the files 
easier. 

BASEMENT BOYS LIVES! 

Well, we'd heard from all quarters that 
Basement Boys Software had given up the 
ghost, but it turns out that Mike Henry was 
just on a short sabbatical. If you call now, 
you'll get a recording indicating that the 
updated version 4.0 of Fast Hack'Em is 
available. We are still hearing rumors that he 
is pulling back from his own business to work 
once again with StarPoint, where he was 
instrumental in the development of the original 
Di-Sector. We'll keep trying to find out for 
sure. 

AMIGA SUPPORT ON BIX 

Commodore is moving its official Amiga 
Developer's Support to the BIX network. 
Registered Amiga Developers will now have 
direct access on-line to Commodore's support 
staff, which should help smooth out the process 
for developing ever more challenging software 
on this highly complex machine. This is a very 
positive step by Commodore, and hopefully it 
will help to alleviate some of the long delays 
we've seen in the development of Amiga 
products thus far. 



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AMIGA ON SATURDAY NITE 

Wc missed it, but wc read in the Western 
Indiana Commodore Users Group newsletter 
that the Amiga was used in a sketch on NBC's 
Saturday Nite Live!. The sketch, aired on 
October 1 8th, parodied the Team Xerox 
commercials, and Amy played a Xerox 
computer! 

AMAZING AMIGA 

By now you have probably seen the episode 
of Amazing Stories that featured an Amiga as 
the central player. The story hasn't aired as I 
write this, but from what we understand it 
features a computer enthusiast who is pulled 
into his .Amiga and spends the rest of the story 
communicating with folks via the computer 
screen. The Robo City News says that Amiga 
Lire! and various Aegis products were involved 
in the Steven Spielburg production. 
Commodore says that Richard Lewis, the art 
director of Amazing Stories, used two Amigas 
to create the animated story sequences, one to 
do real-time digitization of the actor, and the 
other to produce animated overlays. Besides 
seeing heavy use in this particular episode, 
Lewis also uses the Amiga in day-to-day 
applications, especially for the production of 
storyboards and episode ideas. 

PAINT IT BLACK 

Where's the Amiga that was supposed to star 
on Miami Vice? Not that we watch Don 
Johnson's show regularly, and it's possible we 
might have missed it. But from what we hear, 
Amy might not be recognizable on the show 
anyway. We hear the show's art director 
decided that Amy would look more "high-tech" 
painted black'. 

YO-HO! 

Copperstate's Quick Nibbler for the Amiga 
has just taken the Best Musical Soundtrack In 
A Disk Copier Award away from Prism's 
SuperKit. The Quick Nibbler plays a digitized 
soundtrack of some very musical pirates 
singing a pirate tune as it copies! (Yo-Ho! Yo- 
Ho!) Certainly not tasteful, but very amusing. 



QLINK MAKES BIG-TIME 

QuantumLink, the Commodore-only 

communications network established one year 
ago Halloween, has announced that it is 
already the number two network in the 
country in amount of access time used. 
(CompuServe is still, of course, number one.) 
Qlink says that Commodore users burn up TEN 
MILLION minutes a month on QuantumLink, 
Let's see.. .that's 166,666 hours, or 6944 days, or 
J9 years.' Yep, you'd have to sit at a terminal 
for nineteen years solid, 24 hours a day, 7 days 
a week, to equal what QLink users do in a 
single month. Wc have definitely reached the 
point where there is no way a human being can 
keep up with what's happening online. (Not 
even the staff at QuantumLink itself!) 

HABITAT? 

And while we're on the topic of 
QuantumLink, just where in the heck is 
Habitat? This Lucasfilm Productions animated 
online experience was first announced in June, 
and nobody, especially not anyone at 
QuantumLink, can tell us when it will actually 
go online. 

EA NEWSLETTER 

Don't forget to send in those DPaint and 
DVideo product registration cards! As we 
mentioned briefly last issue, Electronic Arts is 
sending a free quarterly newsletter to all 
registered owners of its Deluxe series of 
products for the Amiga. It will feature news 
of new products and product updates, hints on 
how to get the most out of your programs, and 
news about EA and users of their products. 
Best of all, it promises to be less a company 
newsletter than an informative, informal user 
newsletter. EA went to great lengths to hire an 
EA outsider, Amiga enthusiast, and 
experienced user, our old friend Paul 
Montgomery of the First Amiga Users Group, 
as Editor, 

QUOTE OF THE MONTH 

"We would rather have seen the Amiga sink 
than have it become an Atari computer!" 

-an anonymous Amiga executive 




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TREASURE 

You can participate in a real online treasure 
hunt on QLink. Treasure is an actual quest for 
a real 24k gold horse with a key in its belly 
that will open a safe deposit box containing 
half a million dollars. The horse is buried 
somewhere in the continental U.S. on public 
property, and that's all you know to start with. 
You can order a set of clues online, and then 
participate in a message base that has been set 
up for the exchange of information. {I'm going 
to help you by sharing my clues?) It won't be a 
piece of cake: the internationally renouned 
puzzlemaker Dr. Crypton was responsible for 
creating this treasure hunt. 

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL 

At the Amiga Developer's Conference, Sublogic 
was showing three Amigas running Flight 
Simulator II, hooked together via the serial 
port and using the multiple planes option. The 
screens of each computer showed all three 
planes in the air. You can hook up any two 
computers (including Atari STs, IBM PCs, etc.) 
running the latest off-the-shelf version of FSII 
and see the other plane out your window. 
With a special "host" utility (available through 
SubLogic) you can hook up several. 

COMPUTER ART 

If you've ever wanted to own some really 
fine computer art, CompuServe is giving you 
the opportunity to do so. Wayne Schmidt, the 
Quintessential Commodore Computer Artist 
who is responsible for the Middle Earth picture 
on the Doodle! disk, the Pen d Candle picture 
that Inkwell likes to show off with the 
Flexidraw lightpen, and the Pola Negri portrait 
that did so well in Commodore Micro- 
computing's last graphics contest, has made 
available his entire art collection for 
downloading on the Commodore Art & Music 
SIG on CIS. The Wayne Schmidt Collection 
fills five disks in compressed format, so it 
won't be cheap to download, especially at 300 
baud, but this is a rare opportunity for you 
computer art lovers out there to own a 
collection of Wayne Schmidts. Our local 
CompuServe connection is so bad here in Iowa 
City that I'm still trying to download my copy 
successfully, but if you have better luck in 
your area, you'll want to get at least one disk 
from this collection. 



TRUTH IN ADVERTISING 




We forgot to say anything about it at the 
time, but in thumbing thru a stack of back 
issues of AmigaWorld we rediscovered what has 
to be the most misleading cover blurb ever 
printed by a computer magazine. On the cover 
of the May/June '86 AmigaWorld, in bold 
white letters, the issue promises A Free Word 
Processor! A close inspection of the contents 
reveals that the article associated with the title 
is not a type-in wordproccssing program, but a 
short tutorial on how to use the screen editor 
included on every Amiga WorkBench disk! 
This is a little late, perhaps, but: For Shame, 
AmigaWorld! 

POWER WITHOUT THE PRICE 

Chapter Thirty-Two: The incredible sound 
effects on the Atari ST version of StarGlider 
were reportedly created by digitizing the 
sounds on an Amiga and then porting them 
over to the ST and creating a driver routine to 
play them back with the ST's much-less-capable 
sound chips. I don't make this stuff up, folks, 
I just report it. 

R.I. P. MICRO FORGE 

We got their hard drive reviewed last issue 
just in time to see The Micro Forge succomb to 
the ups and downs of the business world, 
including the fact that they offered only 
passable products at high prices. Some of their 
stuff is showing up on the closeout market, but 
I'd advise you to be extremely cautious about 
buying something as complicated as a hard 
drive from a vendor who is out of business. 
No word yet on whether anyone will pick up 
The Micro Forge's products. 



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CABLETV AND AMIGA 



It's not often that we get to report on a new 
and exciting Amiga development that's 
happening in our home town, but this time 
we've got one. As in most communities, Iowa 
City's cable television system features a 
channel for local government access. And, as 
in most communities, it is for the most part 
used to flash plain text messages about when 
the city hall will be closed, and to play an 
occasional grainy vidoetape of a boring city 
council meeting. 

But Drew Shaffer, the city's cable TV 
coordinator, is out to change all that. For the 
last four years he has been trying to set up a 
system that would be interactive; that would let 
viewers call in and use a touch-tone phone to 
scroll through menus on the TV screen to find 
out all kinds of community information. He 
first tried to set up a system using an Apple II, 
but found it did not have the capabilities he 
needed. He moved on through a Leading Edge, 
an AT&T, and an IBM/PC before he 
discovered the Amiga. 

He's found the Amiga to be perfectly suited 
to the project. It's been equipped with 512K 
of RAM, a Comspec 2 meg fast RAM 
expansion, a modem, and a printer. Shaffer 
says they would eventually like to expand the 
system with a video digitizer and a hard drive. 

The IGIV system, which was written in 
Amiga BASIC with some support routines in C, 
lets a user dial up the Amiga for three minutes 
of access time. The Amiga displays a menu of 
choices covering areas of interest in the 
community from bus schedules to job 
opportunities. By selecting items with the 
touch-tone phone keypad, users can gain access 
to a great deal of information. The Amiga is 
not only used to display the information on the 
screen, but its speech capabilities are used to 
read the information at the same time. "People 
seem to really like the speech," says Shaffer, 
"and we've had some very positive 
from blind users." 

Shaffer says that even though the system is 
still in its early stages, and has only been 
online a half dozen unannounced and irregular 
times, the average time between callers has 
been less than one minute. "We log the users in 
to hardcopy on the printer, to see how much 
the system is used and to see which features 
are most popular," says Shaffer. The most 
popular features thus far have been the online 
user survey, jobs information, local news 
summaries, tax and tax fund allocation 
information, bus routes, and the city council 



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agenda. "But by far the most popular feature 
has been the Joke of the Day," says Shaffer. 
"People seem to like listening to the Amiga 
actually tell a joke." The monotone "Ha, Ha," 
that Amy adds after the punchline does seem 
to make the joke twice as funny. 

"This is definitely a commercial product," 
says Shaffer, "and one that is uniquely 
appropriate to the Amiga." He sees 
applications not only in cable TV, but in 
public access information systems and closed- 
circuit installations. 

They are still coming up with the requisite 
number of Guru Meditations, but Shaffer has 
high hopes for the system. And, for now, this 
Amiga sits in her corner in the basement of the 
civic center, blithely keeping the residents of 
Iowa City up-to-date on community 
happenings, 

AMIGA AT PALOMAR 

Astronomers at Mt. Palomar Observatory are 
using the Amiga to help collect, collate, and 
display data from their telescopes. The Amiga 
is used for the calibration of the CCD light 
detectors used at the objectives of telescopes 
that study distant astronomical objects such as 
quasars. Amigas are also used to control the 
shutter timing on the CCD scopes, and to store 
the digitized information they gather. A 
program to directly display the CCD's video 
images on the Amiga display on-site at the 
observatory has also just gone into service. 
Amigas back at Caltech help with other chores. 
Fred Harris, a member of the Palomar team, 
says they eventually hope to link the Amigas to 
the Astronomy Department's VAX computers, 
and add 40-meg hard drives to the Amigas at 
the observatory so that they can store multiple 
images. 

THINGS WE'D LIKE TO SEE 

Amiga: Mouse speed adjustment from within 
applications programs. Wouldn't it be nice to 
be able to draw fast, then slow down for detail 
work? You can do that now if you want to 
switch over to Preferences and adjust the 
mouse speed, then switch back to your paint 
program. Time-consuming, to say the least. 
Amiga: Font reassignment from within an 
application. If your program uses fonts at all, 
the odds are good that you are stuck with the 
fonts that you had assigned when you first ran 
the program. Why not let the user reassign 
fonts from within the program? Does that 
make too much sense? 



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QLINK NEW PRODUCTS 

Robert Baker runs a section on 
QuantumLink's Commodore Information 
Network in which he tracks new products for 
Commodore machines. If you're up on QLink, 
it's worth checking out. He typically updates 
the information at least every 48 hours. Wc 
got several leads on new products from Bob 
for this issue. 

GENERIC LABEL POCKETS 

If you're like me, you reuse old disks until 
they are worn out, and in the process they 
accumulate a six-inch thick layer of new disk 
labels. Well, Weber & Sons, 3468 Highway 9, 
Freehold NJ 07728, has a new disk labelling 
system that consists of a clear plastic stick-on 
pocket and replacable cards. You get 100 
plastic pockets, 100 white and 100 color cards 
$19.45, or you can check out a sample pack of 
25 for $6. 

C= PC CLONES 

Well, here are the specs (finally!) on 
Commodore's PC clones, which should be 
showing up in the U.S. shortly: The PCIO has 
5I2K of RAM, a single 360K 5.25" drive, an 
EGA color graphics card, and built-in parallel 
and serial I/O ports. It will be priced under 
SiOOO. The PC20 has 640K and two drives, 
and will sell for about $1200. Both systems 
will handle an off-the-shelf 5.25" add-on 20 
meg hard drive. 



New for the 64 




1 



required for the unit. No word yet on how 
much it will cost (some say less than $200), but 
it apparently will give you a full 512K of 
bank-switched RAM, and may come with 
RAMdisk software, 

1581 3.5 " DISK DRIVE 

The latest word on the 1581 is that it will not 
ship until the first quarter of next year...at 
least. Technical details are still sketchy, and 
some are not even pinned down yet, but it 
appears that the 1581 will use some form of 
MFM recording and not Commodore GCR, so 
it will not be anything like 1541/1571 format. 
Nor will it be Amiga format compatible, even 
though it will be double-sided with 80 tracks 
per side. It will provide full-track buffering 
which will help speed up data transfers over 
the serial buss and make it reasonably fast. 
Word is that Commodore is calling this a "high- 
end" product and will price it considerably 
higher than the 1571. 

MONEY MACHINE 




COMAL TODAY INDEX 

If you've got the first 12 issues of COMAL 
Today (and doesn't everybody?), then you need 
the COMAL Today Index. It lists every article 
in the first twelve issues by title, author, and 
keyword. With over 4000 entries, it's your 
fault if you can't find what you're looking for 
now! S6.95 + $2 shpg from COMAL Users 
Group, 6041 Monona Dr., Madison WI 53716, 
608/222-4432. 

1764 RAM EXPANDER 

Commodore's 1764 RAM Expansion for the 
C64 will come with a replacement power 
supply for the C64 to provide the extra power 



Money Machine is a bimonthly publication 
from Don Vandeventer devoted to making 
money with your Commodore computer. The 
first issue (Nov/Dec) is a thin 40 pages in 
black & white, and costs as much as INFO 
($3.95). The reviews are outdated, and if they 
seem familiar it is because at least a couple of 
them are simply rewrites of reviews from 
ancient issues of INFO 64. (Omniwriter? 
Come on, that one isn't even available any 
more!) Anyway, until this magazine gets on 
with it and passes along some new information, 
and provides better value for the cover price, 
we can't recommend it. The idea is a good 
one, and we hope that Don can turn it around 
and make this publication worth the cover 
price. S16 for 6 issues, from: Money Machine, 
PO Box 2618, Ocala FL 32678, 984/622-1022. 



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FASTFINGERS 

Fastfingers is a full-blown SID chip 
synthesizer software package for the C64. It 
features 256 presets and allows you to define 
your own, too. It's menu-driven, and a 4 octave 
keyboard will full-size keys is optional. 
Fastfingers gives you 10 minutes of real-time 
recording at 60 notes per minute, and allows 
fast/slow playback. It includes 13 effects like 
glide, vibrato, and wah wah. You can also play 
one voice while the computer plays another. 
Fastfingers is $24.95, with keyboard Si 19.85 
from See-Thru Enterprises, 10382 Shenandoah 
Crcs., Windsor, Ont, CANADA N8R 1 B5. 

TARDUS SOUND SAMPLER 

The TARDUS-12S sound sampler for the 

Commodore 64 plugs into the user port and has 
line in, mlc in, and audio out jacks. It's an 8- 
bit sampler with a variable sampling rate of 
IkHz to 30 kHz and will let you pull in up to 
41 seconds of digitized sound. It offers some 
pretty interesting live effects like reverb, 
chorus, slapback, echo, pitch conversion, sound 
dubbing, sequencing & editing, and a phlanger. 
There's even voice recognition software 
included. It's $98.95 from Digital Engineering 
and Design, 2718 S.W. Kelly, Suite C165, 
Portland OR 97201. 

THE PERFECT COLLEGE 

The two big questions most parents have 
about college are: (1) Which one is best for my 
child?, and (2) How the heck can I pay for it? 
Well, The Perfect College from Mindscape will 
help answer the first, and may even give you 
some clues on the second. With this program, 
you can select from among 1650 four-year 
colleges and universities. You feed the 
program your criteria concerning course of 
study, costs, location, etc., and it prints out a 
list of potential selections, complete with 
addresses and phone numbers. The Perfect 
College is $19.95 when purchased alone, but it 
also comes free with The Perfect Score, 
Mindscape's college entrance exam preparation 
program. From Mindscape, 3444 Dundee Rd 
Northbrook IL 60062, 312/480-7667. 

TAX MASTER 

With the new year upon us, it's once again 
time to start thinking about Income Taxes. 
Pleasant thought, huh? To help you through 
this trial. Master Software offers Tax Master. 



an income tax preparation program for the 
Comrnodore 64. This year's version includes a 
built-in calculator, and has, of course, been 
updated to match the latest revisions in the tax 
laws. Tax Master is S30 from Master Software, 
6 Hillery Ct., Randallstown MD 21133, 301/922- 
2962. 

GREETING CARD MAKER 

Activision is pushing Greeting Card Maker 

into the growing ranks of printer creativity 
software titles. This one lets you create (what 
else?) greeting cards, using eight fonts, two 
dozen borders and backgrounds, a selection of 
50 precomposed verses, and many graphics. 
You can choose from six card sizes and types, 
including one 3D popup design. The diskette 
also includes an envelope maker utility, and an 
integral address book for up to 128 names and 
addresses. Unlike some other cardmaking 
programs, this one will let you save your 
designs. The package includes 20 sheets of 
classy printer paper. $34.95 from: Activision, 
2350 Bayshore Parkway, Mountain View CA 
94043, 415/960-0410. 

THINKING CAP 




Thinking Cap is an idea processor for the 
C64 from Brodcrbund. Wish we'd had it in 
here in time for the Idea Processor article last 
issue, but like we promised, it looks like idea 
processors for the C64 will not be in short 
supply. This one looks very good, with a pull- 
down menu user interface that is extremely 
easy to use. It offers up to seven levels of 
organization, with 16 subtopics per level. 
Outlines can run to six printed pages. A built- 
in text editor lets you compose a final draft of 
your paper after the outline is done. Thinking 
Cap is 49.95 from: Broderbund, 17 Paul Dr., 
San Rafael CA 94903, 415/479-1700. 



32 

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CAPTURE & PROMENADE 

Just in case you missed it last issue, we 
happen to think that Capture from Jason- 
Ranheira is the very best of the cartridge 
snapshotters. Besides its capabilities as a 
snapshotter, however, Capture will enable you 
to make cartridges out of your snapshotted 
programs. With Promenade you can burn 
EPROMs with snapshotted programs or even 
with your own code. If you talk to the 
hardware pros, you will get the concensus that 
Promenade is in a class by itself when it comes 
to EPROM programming on the C64/C128. 
The Promenade handles standard EPROMs to 
32k and costs S99.50. Capture is $39.95, and a 
Deluxe Set with Capture, Promenade, and 
materials is available for S199.95 from: Jason- 
Ranheim, 1805 Industrial Dr., Auburn CA 
95603, (800/421-7731). 

NEW GEOS TITLES 



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GEOS seems to be getting an awful lot of 
support. ..at least from Berkeley Softworks! 
Since just last issue they have introduced 
Geodex, an electronic card file with mail 
merge capabilities, DeskPak 1, a set of GEOS 
utility programs including a calendar, icon 
editor, blackjack game, and graphics grabber 
(to convert Print Shop, Print Master, and 
Newsroom graphics to GEOS format), FontPak, 
a set of new fonts, and Writer's Workshop, the 
awaited enhanced version of geoWrite. Writer's 
Workshop includes the capability to grab text 
from Paperclip and other wordprocessors, the 
same geoMerge utility included in the Geodex 
package, and a laser printer driver for the 
Apple LaserWriter. These packages also all 
include the latest updated versions of the 
GEOS desktop, with faster, enhanced printer 
drivers (including one for the HP LaserJet!) 
and new input drivers for the Commodore 1350 
mouse, Flexidraw lightpen, and Koala Pad. 



DIAGNOSE 64 

The good folks at Micro R&D have sent 
along a unique product that will mostly be of 
interest to the Commodore service technician, 
though I can see it as a valuable asset to users 
groups and even hardware types with extra 
money they don't know what to do with. It's 
called Diagnose 64. This is an oversize 
cartridge outfitted with a bank of LEDs that 
will analyze a dead or malfunctioning C64 and 
tell you just what is wrong with it. Micro 
R&D's Max Donaldson says if the C64's power 
supply is operational. Diagnose 64 will tell you 
what chips arc bad in your computer. He says 
they've pulled chips from a test 64 until it 
looked skeletal and the cartridge was still 
telling them what was wrong! Sounds like it 
could save a lot of bench time at the ol' repair 
center. Anyway, Diagnose 64 is from Micro 
R&D, 3333 S. Wadsworth, Suite A104, 
Lakcwood CO 80227, 3003/985-1473. 



New fop the 128 



PAPERCLIP II 

We've been using a beta version of Paperclip 
II for a couple of months now, and are more 
convinced than ever that it is still the most 
powerful wordproccssor available for 8-bit 
Commodore machines. This version includes 
many small additions and enhancements, plus 
the expansion of the active text area to 999 
lines. Telecommunications terminal software 
has been built into Paperclip II, and files can 
be passed back and forth from the 
wordprocessor to the terminal and vice-versa 
using XMODEM or Punter C-1 protocols, a real 
boon for the active telecommunications buff. 
Besides this obvious advantage of file 
up/downloading, having your terminal program 
resident with your wordprocessor can just plain 
save you a lot of time swapping programs back 
and forth. Other new functions include: a 
macro key capability which lets you enter 
often-used words and phrases with a single 
keystroke, output in multiple columns, optiona'. 
automatic word wrap, and a fast built-in 
30,000 word spelling checker which can be 
upgraded with your own user dictionaries. The 
manual has been redone, and is very good as 
well as being spiral-bound. Unfortunately for 
INFO, the HP LaserJct+ printer is just about 
the only printer on the planet fiot supported by 
Paperclip II. This program, like all of 
Batteries Included's programs, is dongle- 
protectcd. $79.95 from Batteries Included, 
17875 Sky Park N., Suite P, Irvine CA 92714, 
714/250-8723. 






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KYAN PASCAL 128 

Kyan Pascal is now available in a C128 
version. For $69.95 you get a true native-code 
compiler with a built-in macro assembler, a 
runtirne library, 80-column screen editor, and 
extensions such as include files, string 
handling, and random files. If this is as good 
as their C64 version, it will be great, and will 
be much easier to work with in 80 columns. 
Kyan Software, 1850 Union St. #183, San 
Francisco CA 94123, 415/626-2080. 

ABACUS 128 LANGUAGES 

It looks like Abacus has picked up the rights 
to Visionary COBOL, the only COBOL we 
know of for Commodore 8-bit computers (at 
least the author's name is the same!) Besides 
the C64 version, Abacus is offering an 
enhanced C128 version of the language. I'm no 
great fan of COBOL, which can best be 
described as a mainframe monster that reads a 
bit like Middle English, but there are a LOT of 
programs out there in COBOL, most of them 
business apAlications. If you want to learn 
COBOL for professional reasons, this looks like 
a good route to go. Code is upward and 
downward compatible with the C64 version. 
The system is basically identical to the C64 
version, except you can use 80 columns and the 
editor and other functions which are 
implemented as disk-loaded overlays in the C64 
version arc memory-resident in the C128 
version. If you have a minimal system, this 
compiler will work with a single disk drive. 

Also available from Abacus is their BASIC 
128 compiler. This surprisingly competent 
compiler allows you to compile a BASIC 
program to p-code or machine language. The 
C128 version is considerably faster and more 
efficient that Abacus' C64 BASIC compiler. 
S59.95 from: Abacus Software, PO Box 7211, 
Grand Rapids MI 49510, 616/241-5510. 

FLEET SYSTEM THREE 

There are getting to be quite a few really 
good-looking wordprocessors for the C128. 
One of the latest is Fleet System 3 . This 
wordprocessor for 80-column use on the C128 
includes a 90,000 word spellchecker, an integral 
thesaurus and many other features. Like 
WordPro, PaperClip, and many others, Fleet 
System 3 is not a what-you-see-is-what-you-get 
wordprocessor, but a format-command 
wordprocessor. $99.95 from: Professional 
Software, 51 Fremont St., Needham MA 02194, 
617/444-5224. 



WORDPRO 128S 

WordPro 128/S is the latest addition to Pro- 
Line's series of wordprocessors for Commodore 
machines. This version includes a 90,000 word 
spellchecker and a 40,000 character text 
capacity, as well as proportional print 
capabilities. These features, combined with 
WordPro's solid reputation, should make this 
version a contender. S89.95 from Pro-Line, 755 
The Queensway E., Unit 9, Mississauga Ont 
Canada L4Y 4C5, 416/273-6350. 



New {DP the AMIfrA 



AMIGAZINE! 

Amigazine! from Digital Publishing is a 
magazine-on-a-disk for the Amiga. It features 
software and hardware reviews, programs in 
many languages, system tips, and graphics, 
animation, and music demos. Amigazine! runs 
from the WorkBench. Articles and program 
instructions can be sent to your printer if you 
prefer a hardcopy. Single and back issues are 
$6.95, 6 month subscriptions are $35.95 and 12 
month subscriptions are $59.95. 12 issue 
subscriptions are available overseas via airmail 
for $71,95 from: Amigazine!, PO Box 9231, 
Bakersfield, CA 93389 

A TRUE MULTI-AMIGA 

If you want to give real multitasking a try, 
check out Multi User ($120), a software 
package which allows you to hook up to 8 or 
more dumb terminals to your Amiga's serial 
port. You can hook up a single serial terminal 
directly to the Amiga, or use a multiplexer for 
more. Each can run any text-only Amiga 
application (no pull-down menus, etc.). The 
system also lets you run a shell, do true cut- 
and-paste editing, and pipe I/O between 
applications. From Conceptual Computing, 603 
Castlefield Ave, Toronto Ont. CANADA M5N 
1L9. 

AMY SWINGS 

The Symphony Library from Speech Systems 
(38W255 Deerpath Rd, Batavia IL 60510) is a 
series of disks full of music to play on your 
Amiga. Each disk contains 100 songs (3 hours 
of music!), and gives you control over 
instruments, tempo, etc., and even lets you pick 
your own instruments, including those you 
have digitized yourself. The Symphony series 
uses standard IFF music files, and thus is 
compatible with most other Amiga music 
programs. It will also play back through MIDI 
instruments! Each disk (there are eight to pick 
from) is $39.95 plus $3 shipping; you can get a 
list of all 800 available songs for $3.95 




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PRO VIDEO 

If you're into serious video, you might want 
to check out Pro Video CG I, a character 
generation program with several available 
styles and sizes of text, individually selectable 
character color, shadow and edging, grids, and 
animated transitions. It gives you 32K of text 
memory. We haven't seen this one, and the 
price is said to be pretty high. Find a dealer 
and check this one out if you are serious about 
it. From JDK Images, 2224 East 86 Street, 
Suite 14, Bloomington MN 55420, 612/854-7793. 

HARD DISK BACKUP i 

HardHat is a hard disk backup program that 

saves your HD files to floppies. (Not the best 
solution, but you've got to do something.) It 
lets you back up all or part of your HD, and 
provides some kind of data compression to 
make it more tolerable. $69.95 plus $3.50 
shipping from: Wcstcom Industries, 3386 
Floyd, Los Angeles CA 90068. 

AMIGA EXPANSION 

Pacific Cyprus has three expansion products 
for the Amiga. The Xpander II is a 2 slot 
expansion box that already has one slot filled 
with a 2meg RAM board. The RAM board is a 
no-wait-state design and uses 256K DRAM 
chips that can be installed in increments of 
512KB, 1MB and 2MB. The SCSI 
Multifunction Board is for interfacing a 
generic SCSI hard disk drive to your Amiga. A 
driver program is required on your Workbench 
disk. The board also gives you a second 
parallel printer port and another RS-232 port, 
a battery backed-up clock, and a power supply. 

The Modem Board is a 300/1200 baud Hayes 
compatible modem on a board. Available 
from: Pacific Cypress, 40127 Landing 
Parkway, Fremont CA 94538. 

D0S-2-D0S 

DOS-2-DOS does for the Amiga what Big 
Blue Reader does for the C128: lets it read and 
copy IBM/PC format files. The latest version 
will work with both 5.25" and 3.5" MS-DOS 
formats. Besides being able to translate and 
copy ASCII files back and forth between both 
formats, DOS-2-DOS also lets you get a 
DIRectory of MS-DOS diskettes, TYPE ascii 
files, and FORMAT MS-DOS disks. You need 
at least one external drive to do all this, and of 
course that drive must be a 5.25" drive if you 
are planning on working with standard IBM 
disks. D0S-2-D0S is $55.00 from: Central 
Coast Software, 268 Bowie Dr., Los Osos CA 
93402, 805/528-4906. 



PUBLIC DOMAIN 

If you are sick of buying PD disks only to 
find out that 90% of the programs on them are 
crap, then you might be interested in Amware's 
catalog. For only $5.95 each postpaid, Amware 
offers over 40 public domain disks for the 
Amiga. Each has been compiled carefully 
from only the best public domain offerings. 
We've got six of the series here, covering 
telecommunications, games, graphics, and 
utility programs, and almost without exception 
the programs are complete, functional, 
professional, and worthwhile. The 

Entertainment #2 games disk, for example, 
includes Four excellent games. Monopoly, 



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Public domain Monopoly. 

Revcrsi, Life, and Clue, as well as several 
decent demos. The Graphics #1 disk includes a 
screen dump program, an IFF screen-grabber, a 
font editor, and the excellent public domain 



Macintosh screens converled Lo 
AMIGA via the excellent public 
domain conversion utility, 
MacViev. A MustHavel 





MacView program, which allows you to no: 
only view Macintosh Macpaint files (several ol' 
which are included on the disk), but convert 
them to Amiga format! (If there was a Nobel 
Prize for public domain software, this program 
would get our vote.) For S5.95, I don't see how 
you could go wrong, SASE for a catalog. 
Amware, PC Box 19474, Jacksonville FL 32245. 



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Zing! is a hybrid operating system for the 
Amiga which combines features from the CLI 
environment and the Workbench, adds 
versatility, and ends up with something that 
will let you do just about anything you can do 
under the CLI, but easier. Much of the time 
you won't even have to type a filename. Zing! 
includes file copy and display capabilities, the 
ability to pop up a CLI at any time via a press 
of a function key, a print spooler, a screen 
dump and screen save (IFF) utility, and much 
more. It is much more fun to use than either 
of the user interfaces that come with your 
Amiga. Zing! is $79.95 + $3 shpg. from: 
Meridian Software, PO Box 890408, Houston 
TX 77289, 713/488-2144. 

BASIC COMPILER 

Softworks BASIC is a BASIC compiler for the 
Amiga, but it is not an Amiga BASIC or even 
an ABASIC compiler. Softworks BASIC 
provides its own version of BASIC based on 
DEC and Hewlett-Packard implementations of 
the language. Besides the usual set of floating 
point and integer functions and string 
manipulation commands, this version also 
includes commands for the use of random and 
ISAM files. What it does not have are graphics 
and sound functions. $99.00 from: Softworks 
Limited, 2944 N. Broadway, Chicago IL 60657, 
312/975-4030. 



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This program is a disk surgeon. You use it to 
analyze and recover crashed disks. The main 
display is colorful and informative, indicating 
sector usage and/or bad sectors. All functions 
are controlled via pull-down menus. It's nice 
to use. DiskCraft lets you scan a disk for 
errors, format individual tracks, copv sectors, 
fix errors, locate files, repair the DOS 
structure, etc. The manual is good, with a lot 
of tutorial material. Version 1.0 has problems 
cither with version 1.2 of the operating system 
or with expansion RAM, I'm not sure which 
From Rankin Systems Software, 2851 Coleridge 
Rd., Cleveland Heights OH 441 18. 

LEGITIMATE AMIGA USE 

If you own a small business and are still 
looking for an excuse to purchase an Amiga, 
the NIMBUS Record Keeping System may be it. 
It is said to be simple, colorful, and easy to 
use. For S299.00 you get G/L, A/R, A/P, cash 
accounting, reports and earnings and expense 
statements. It runs as a multi-tasking 
application and gives you access to more than 
one function at a time, and does printing as a 
background function. It even uses the mouse 
and menus. Contact NIMBUS Corp, 637 
Windmill Ranch Rd, Olivenhain CA 92024 





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COMDEX Report 

by Peggy Herrington 

There was slim pickin's on the exhibit floor 
at the '86 Fall COMDEX Show in Las Vegas, 
although we uncovered several fine Amiga 
products and even something for the C64. In a 
bid to move into what has been Macintosh 
territory, the big deal was desktop publishing 
on the IBM PC and its legion of clones, with a 
fleet of laser printers and page layout 
programs launched for MS-DOS machines. 
Ventura Publishing, an elaborate package from 
Xerox, looked good, which it should at $895. 
But because it, and everything else we saw 
requires an AT, it made us wonder how many 
regular old PCs are going to be upgraded so 
people can do what INFO has been 
accomplishing with Commodore equipment and 
elbow grease for years. PC developers seemed 
excited about it but even Show Daily headlines 
on desktop publishing seminars weren't enough 
to stifle the yawns in the press room. 

Exhibitors were scattered about without 
regard to type between the Convention Center, 
the West Hall and four major hotels, which 
made it tough to find C64 and Amiga 
companies. Neither Apple nor Commodore 
themselves were there (despite the presence of 
IBM and Atari), but AmigaWorld hosted a 
reception for which Commodore/Amiga 
provided at least a dozen Amigas. It was a 
madhouse — a couple hundred people showed 
up — and we soon went from elbowing dealers 
and wholesalers to munching hors d'ocuvres 
and exchanging gossip. Lots of products were 
demonstrated there rather than at the show, not 
only because it was cheaper but because an 
official Amiga Developers Conference had 
been held on the west coast a few days earlier. 
From those attendees, we learned that Version 
1.2 of Kickstart and Workbench is being made 
available on disks with a 40-page manual for 
$15 through dealers, a private developers area 
has been established on Byte's BIX, making it 
the official Amiga support network, and Fred 
Fish was presented with an award for his great 
public domain disk collection. But On With 
The Show... 



Amiga WordPerfect is supposed to be 
available this spring and will offer all the 
features that have made it the number-one best 
seller in the PC world, according to 

WordPerfect's press statement. Mark Hamilton, 
the programmer doing the conversion, says the 
Amiga version will be even more powerful 
than that for the PC (and the ST and Mac, 
both of which are being done now) due to its 
operating system and 880K disk drive. Some 
of the features include What-You-See-Is-What- 
You-Gct word processing with math and 
sorting, merging, macros, puU-down menus, on- 
screen columns, graphic imports, headers, 
footers, footnotes and endnotes, and an 
integrated spell checker and thesaurus. I saw a 
hands-off ('cause was still crash-prone) Amiga 
demo and it was impressive. Expansion 
memory is supported and 32 windows can be 
open concurrently; with macros, according to 
Hamilton, you can work in all of them at once. 
IBM-PC WordPerfect is priced at $495 (mail- 
ordered it's about S200), and establishing the 
price for the Amiga version was the subject of 
much discussion. They're planning to market it 
through their existing PC dealers, whom they 
don't wish to offend with a price cut since it is 
more powerful, but they also feel that Amiga 
users won't support that kind of price-tag. For 
more info, contact WordPerfect Corporation, 
288 West Center Street, Oren, Utah 84057, 
801/227-4420. 



The Creator is an Amiga special-effects 
generator. Actually, it's a high-tech black box 
with lots of flashing lights that does the most 
amazing things to video images. How'd you 
like to add the black-and-white lead-in that 
slowly fades to color in Saint Elsewhere to 
your own videos? With The Creator, 
ShowTime says you can do fades, polarization 
and posterization as well as monochrome; it 




will produce synchronous effects with soft or 
hard edges, do wipes, cuts, dissolves and 
superimpose any image, any size, anywhere on 
the screen. It allows look-ahead previews of 4- 
matrix video, with high-fidelity stereo inputs 
selectable from two busses. And, with a new 
version of SoundScape ProMIDI Studio 
(Mimetics' was actually demonstrating The 








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Creator), you can write and synchronize stereo 
music to video images with professional 
SYMPTE timing and audio breakaways. (Look, 
Mom! MTV!) The Creator is 3-5/8"W by 8- 
I/4"H by 7"D, weighs 3.5# and comes equipped 
with a joystick, fader bar and 30 built-in 
patterns plus reverse (for a total of 60). It's 
available for $499 from ShowTime, 2715 Fifth 
Street, Tillamook, OR 97141, 503/842-8841, 

Supra's Amiga Hard Disk Drive houses a 3- 
1/2" drive mechanism with 20-megabytes of 
storage, a real time clock, and a built-in SCSI 
port (pass-thru) for chaining other devices. It 
retails for $995 and, although none is provided, 
it will accomodate Supra expansion RAM 
upgrades from 1/2-meg ($399), 1-mcg (S449) 
and so on, to a maximum of 4-megs (although 
no prices were available for the latter). The 
drive is 22"L by 5"W by 2-I/2"H and an 
interface board connects it to the expansion 
port at the right of the Amiga chassis (which it 
matches in color). Supra says they will ship 
January in quantity and will have 30- and 60- 
meg drives available shortly thereafter, along 
with a streaming tape back-up which they 
estimate will be S899. They were also 
exhibiting their recently licensed CardCo line 
of C64/128 interfaces and software 
(WriteNOW, SpellNOW, CalcNOW) with s'More 
and Freeze Frame. Contact Supra Corp., 1133 
Commercial Way, Albany OR 97321, 503/967- 
9075, for more information. 

The Xebec Hard Disk Drive has a 5-1/4 drive 
mechanism, the 10-megabytc unit being priced 
at $895 and 20-meg at $1295. The drive is 
SASI-SCSI but the host adapter and internal 
full-SCSI bus has provisions for a 2-meg DMA 
RAM expansion board. Although the first 
drives will be shipped in January without 
RAM expansion, as we go to press Xebec 
couldn't make any guarantees but said they're 
trying to provide 2-meg RAM boards after 
purchase (and in future units) at no additional 
cost. It can reside on the Amiga chassis beside 
the monitor. The white putty-colored unit is 
16';L by 3.4"W by 7.5"H, has no pass-thru but is 
quiet since it is convection cooled and Xebec 
says no fan is required. Contact them at 3579 
Highway 50 East, Carson City, NV 89701-2826, 
702/883-4000. 

The Okltel 1200 is Okidata's entry into the 
PC modem market as it joins their line of 9600 
Baud professional units. It responds to 
standard AT Hayes commands, is Bell 212A 
(300 Baud) and 103 (1200 Baud) compatible, 
will auto-dial with Touch or Pulse, auto-answer 
and will configure itself to match the caller's 



Baud rate. It has eight LEDs on its front 
panel, switches for non-standard configurations 
at the rear, and a built-in speaker with volume 
control. Pretty standard stuff so far but get 
this: Its automatic equalization, Okidata says, 
will eliminate interference on noisy phone 




lines and ignore call waiting signals that 
normally terminate contact between computers. 
Retailing for $449, free connect time and 
discounts worth $150 on CompuServe, NcwsNet 
and Dow Jones News/Retrieval will be 
included. Contact Okidata at 532 Fellowship 
Road, Mr. Laurel, NJ 08054, 609/235-2600. 

Logistix, a project and time management- 
oriented spreadsheet that works in units from 
half an hour to years is another of the vertical- 
market products finding their way to the 
Amiga. It's integrated with a data base and 
timesheet (2048 x 1024 cells) and will handle 
presentation graphics. Critical Path projects 
and read Lotus 1-2-3 and dBase files. Over 20 
graph types are available along with 22 built-in 
currency symbols. Logistix produces GANT 
charts, resource histograms and project 
calendars, will specify scheduling constraints 
and do what-if calculations using logical 
operators. It prints reports sideways or straight- 
up on most plotters and ink jet printers. In 
fact, if it won't print with your device, they'll 
configure it for you. $249.95 from Progressive 
Peripherals & Software, 464 Kalamath Street 
Denver CO 80204, 303/825-4144. 

Superbase Personal was completely remodeled 
and rewritten for the Amiga, based on the C64 
version. It's a relational data base management 
system that uses the mouse, pull-down menus 
and windows. It's fast; although I didn't time 
it, PP&S claims it will read a standard name 
and address file in under l/300ths of a second 
from a 3-1/2 disk (B+ tree file structure and 
advanced disk buffering are credited). You 
can define reports using relational queries with 
multiple files and sort levels, and place IFF 
graphics and CAD drawings within text. 
Screen output can be arranged in tables or 
categories, and files can be pulled by subject or 
pagc-by-page - a fast-forward command looks 
handy for novices. Superbase Personal is 
shipping now for $149.95 from Progressive 
Peripherals & Software (sec above). 



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DBMan is also an Amiga relational data base 
management system using windows, the mouse 
and pull-down menus and retailing at $149.95. 
It is dBase command compatible but, according 
to VcraSoft, is 60 times faster. Included is a 
symbolic debugger/editor, data encryption and 
error trapping with automatic recovery. You 
can define multi-child relationships with 192 
variables and have ten active data bases open 
at once (memory permitting), and it will 
accommodate a whopping 2 billion records per 
file. Versions arc available on several personal 
computers (with no royalties or site licenses 
required) and it's available now. We can't tell 
you how it stacks up with other DBMSs from a 
trade-show once-over. Contact Verasoft 
Corporation, 4340 Almaden Expressway, Suite 
#250, San Jose, CA 95118, 408/723-9044, for 
more info. 

CLI-Mate is an Amiga disk management 
program that bypasses the CLI and Workbench, 
allowing disk operations with the mouse. By 
typing only rarely, you can rename and delete 
files, create directories and make multiple file 
copies even to the RAM; disk. CLI-Mate will 
let you adjust print or display options like 
page length, margins and page numbers and 
produce output with or without line numbers 
in hexadecimal or ASCII. It has a fast format 
utility and pattern/wildcard matching. CLI- 
Mate was done by Chris Nicotra, author of the 
public domain program DIRUTL which is 
similar but less extensive. $34.95 from 
Progressive Peripherals & Software (see above). 

The Polaroid Palette was shown at the 
reception. It's an Amiga peripheral that lets 
you take instant Polaroid or developed 35mm 
screen shots without focusing a camera. 
Pictures are taken internally with the Imprint 
software included with the unit which consists 
of a Polaroid Palette film recorder, 35mm 
camera back, 3-1/4 by 4-1/4 instant camera 
back (back means there's no lens assembly), and 
Polachromc instant film processor. In seconds, 
it will it plunk into your hand a perfectly 
focused, instant Polaroid snapshot of any 
image you can get on the screen (low, medium 
or high resolution), and it will produce 4-color 
separations and do continuous-tone black-and- 
whites as well. My untrained eye was amazed 
at the quality of the instant prints (no raster 
lines or screen-bend) but if that's not good 
enough, you can use 35mm film and have it 
developed. The unit itself is about 
ll"Dx6"Wx5"H. It plugs into the composite 
video and serial ports, and comes with cables 
and all accessories. It's available now for 
$2,495 from Liquid Light, 2301 W. 205th Street, 
Suite 106, Torrance, CA 90501, 213/618-0274. 



Unicorn Software introduced an extensive 
line of educational software for the Amiga. 
They demoed Fraction Action for ages 8 and 
up, and Decimal Dungeon for ages 9 and up, 
both for 1 or 2 players with individual 
difficulty level settings and optional timers. 
Three more programs will ship in January; 
Kinderama for preschooler to 6-yr-olds, Math 
Wizard, 1 or 2 players aged 5 to 13, and Animal 
Kingdom featuring zoological species including 
prehistoric, jungle, fish, insects, amphibians 
and birds in six activities for 1 to 4 players, 
ages 6 to 12. Each is $49.95. Unicorn plans to 
release an Amiga package each month next 
year. Unicorn Software, 2950 E. Flamingo 
Road, Greenview Park Suite B, Las Vegas NV 
89121, 702/737-8862. 




Hearsay 1000 is a speech synthesis and 
recognition device that lets you hear and 
respond to your C64/128 by voice. It retails 
for $79.95 and will work not only with their 
special programs but with pre-existing third- 
party software as well -- it was demonstrated 
with Infocom, Epyx, Spinnaker and Batteries 
Included programs. Hearsay's Software for 
Children (S29.95 each) will run with or without 
the unit and includes: Rhyme & Reason, which 
uses nursery rhymes to teach 2 to 5 year olds 
language concepts and names of animals, etc.. 
Aqua Circus which teaches shapes, colors and 
numbers to 2 to 5 year olds, and Think Bank, 
for 6 to 10 year olds, which does numbers, 
equations and math problem-solving. The 
Hearsay Talking Terminal ($29.95) when used 
with the Hearsay 1000, will auto-dial on voice 
command and speak incoming text. Hearsay, 
Inc. 1825 74th Street, New York, NY 11204, 
718/232-7266 




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After painful years of struggling with the 
speed and memory limitations of the 1541 disk 
drive, four independent companies strewn from 
Oregon to Florida prepare the release of 
inexpensive hard disk drives for the 
Commodore 64 personal computer. 

Synchronicity? 

Perhaps. But one thing we know for sure: it's 
about time! The four hard drives entering the 
market arc the JCT-IOOO series from JCT, Inc.; 
the Lt. Kernal from Xetec (previously available 
from Fiscal Information; see articles in issues 
#6 and #10); the ICT Data Chief from In Con 
Trol, Inc.; and Device 9 from Progressive 
Peripherals & Software. Add these to the two 
other hard drives already available --the STIOC 
from Computer Specialties, Inc. (reviewed in 
issue #9), and the discontinued D9060/D9090 
from Commodore itself — and you have a 
healthy selection of hard drives for the 
Commodore 64 and C128 to choose from, 

HARD DISK ADVANTAGES 

The chief advantages of adding a hard disk 
drive to a system are having large amounts of 
data online at one time, the capacity for 
creating very large REL or SEQ data files (up 
to several megabytes), and the potential for 
greater access speeds. Add to these the 
questions of compatibility and price, and you 
have the major factors for determining which, 
if any, of the available hard drives are right 
for your needs. 



MEMORY: Imagine having 19442 blocks 
(five megs) or 38882 blocks (ten megs) free 
without having to swap disks! For the power 
user this kind of data storage is essential. 
Similarly, when handling database, BBS or 
other applications that use lots of data, it's not 
terribly difficult to over-reach the 154rs 170K 
file length limitations. A multi-megabyte hard 
disk drive option puts the 64 and 128 in the 
same league as an Apple II for satisfying small 
business and educational classroom needs but 
at a far better price/performance ratio. 

SPEED: Internally, a hard drive outperforms 
a floppy drive by factors of 10 or more. But a 
hard drive connected via the serial bus is only 
going to offer marginal increases in overall 

speed. Note that none the serial-connected 
hard drives work properly with current 
versions of disk speedup utilities like Fastload 
or Mach 5. 

COMPATIBILITY: Unprotected or dis- 
protccted programs and programs that make 
standard 1541 DOS calls readily work with all 
of these drives, all of which are intelligent and 
programmable to some degree. But predictably, 
each of the hard drives mentioned have 
problems with some copy-protected programs, 
programs that bypass, override or rcprogram 
the 1541's DOS, and, with one exception, 
Commodore's version of CP/M. 

PRICE: The final factor is, of course, what 
you can afford. The lowest list price (S695 for 
3.7 megs) still may be too rich for most users, 
but prices are bound to drop. And keep in 




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mind that per kilobyte of online memory, a hafd 
drive is more cost efficient than a floppy. A 
10 meg drive for $895 comes to about 9.2 cents 
per K (cpK) as compared to the 1541 (84 cpK 
at $149) or the SFD-1001 (28 cpK at $299). 

COMMENTS 

The table presents the major features of the 
six different hard drives that should be 
available by the end of the year. There may 
be other hard drives down the road, too. Both 
Commodore and Skyles Electric Works (of 
Blitz! and 1541 Flash! fame) have recently 
made noises in the hard drive direction. But 
for now, this is the selection; 

D9060 / D9090. Not designed for the 64 but 
works fine using an IEEE interface. These 
Commodore drives have been discontinued, but 
are built like tanks and can still be found. 
Many arc in use in BBS systems. I could have 
sworn that I saw in some user group newsletter 
that warehoused D9060s were being sold 'as is' 
for $295, but several frantic searches through 
my meticulously maintained files <!> failed to 
turn it up. (I've also been told that the D9090 
had some quirks...) 

STIOC. From Computer Specialties, Inc. 
This drive is the only readily available hard 
drive for the 64 as I write, and CSI has just 
slashed the price by $600, to $995, no doubt in 
response to the burgeoning competition. It has 
both serial and IEEE connectors, and one of 
the STlOC's nicer features is a built-in backup 
routine that saves the files on STIOC to any 
disk drive that's connected to it, if you can 
stand the many hours required to do so. 

JCT-1000 Series. These drives should be on 
the market (and discounted) by the time you 
read this, I talked to Ray Rippcy, JCT's chief 
programmer, and several changes and additions 
arc in order since the feature prc-review of the 
JCT-1000 in the September 1986 issue of 
COMPUTER SHOPPER. A routine for 
handling subdirectories (a hard drive must!) has 
been added to the operating system. The JCT's 
DOS is all in ROM and the only the Master 
Jumptablc is loaded into the drive's RAM at 
startup. This makes modifying the drive's 
routines easy! And a dual 10 meg drive (the 
JCT-102]) is in the works and due for release 
sometime early next year. 

ICT DATA CHIEF. This hard drive is 
unique in a number of ways. It comes 
equipped with a (very) 1541-compatible floppy 
drive. It is factory-formatted into 170K 
partitions - about 60 per each 10 megs - for 



enhanced 1541 compatibility, (A special file 
chaining command helps to overcome the 170K 
file length limitation.) It has a large case and 
powcrpack for internal expansion to up to 80 
megabytes! And finally, it works with both the 
64 CP/M cartridge and the 128's CP/M mode 
(as a single-sided Commodore 1541 drive only.) 
The one difficulty is the lack of a CP/M 
command to switch partitions. Also, a second 
serial bus connector required for daisy- 
chaining was missing from the pre-production 
model. 



The chief advantages of adding 
a hard disk drive to a system 
are having large amotints of 
data online at one time, the 
capacity for creating very large 
REL and SEQ data files, and the 
potential for greater access speeds. 



LT. KERNAL. This is the FAST hard drive 
that really started the current hard drive 
commotion. Rather than creating a 1541 work- 
alike hard disk, Fiscal Information designed 
the Lt. Kernal to be a true (i.e., very fast) hard 
drive that is compatible with the Commodore 
64 and its software. The Lt. Kernal's DOS is 
currently about 170K long, completely 
upgradeable and bank-loads as needed into the 
expansion port interface's 16K of RAM. 
Besides adding over 40 new or improved 
commands to the 64's repertoire, the Lt. Kernal 
features an ISEPIC-like utility for installing 
protected programs on the hard disk in such a 
way that they cannot be off-loaded back to a 
floppy disk. What about speed? The early 
versions of Lt. Kernal could transfer 25K bytes 
(a 100 block program) in about one second, or 
about 43 times faster than a 1541. The release 
version can load or save about 38K in the same 
one second. With a 128 in the fast mode, the 



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transfer rates are just about double. That's 
FAST! 

Originally, Cardco was to manufacture and 
market the drive, but Cardco folded and now 
Xetcc has picked up the project. They are 
hoping to have a product out the door by the 
end of the year for under $899. For the Lt. 
Kcrnal to work with the 128 a special card 
must be installed inside the 128. For the 
squeamish or multiple-thumbed, Xetec will 
install the $29.95 upgrade for free (excluding 
shipping costs.) A DOS upgrade for the CP/M 
mode is currently in the works, but no release 
date has been set, 

DEVICE 9 - THE VAULT. This is the 
newest entry into the 64 hard drive derby, 
from Progressive Peripherals and Software. 
According to programmer Scott Maxwell, The 
Vault is designed to be very compatible. For 
instance, creating a subdirectory is as simple as 
formatting a disk on the 1541. It's the only 
drive so far to support the I28's fast serial 
mode and it also works fine with Superbase 64. 



CONCLUSIONS 

All of the current hard drives offer 
outstanding CBM DOS compatibility and (with 
only one exception) excellent value for the 
price. But at this point only the Lt. Kernal 
does not sacrifice the speed potential of a hard 
drive (or cost an extra arm or leg) to get there. 
Eventually there will be speedup utilities for 
all of the drives that use the serial port, but 
the potential gain, as with the 1541, is severely 
limited. Until other hard drive makers can 
provide a parallel interface with the 64, cither 
through the expansion port or the user port, 
the Lt. Kernal will remain in a class pretty 
much by itself. 

But the main thing is: they're finally here. If 
you're one of those who have moaned and 
groaned for a hard drive for your 64, the 
choice is now up to you. Enjoy! fi^^SMar 













Turbo 
Utility 


Sub 
Directory 


Logical 
Devices 


128 
CP/M 


Super 
Base? 


Table 1: Hard Drive Compa 


risons 




Drive 
Name 


Mega- 
bytes 


Avai I • 
able 


Price Port 


D9060 
D9090 


5 
7.5 


now 
now 


*1* 
*1* 


IEEE 
IEEE 


no 
no 


no 
no 


no 
no 


no 
no 


yes 

yes 


ST1QC 


10 


now 


$ 995 


serial, IEEE 


no 


no 


no 


no 


no 


JCT-1000 
JCT-1005 
JCT-1010 


3.7 

5 
10 


11/86 
11/86 
11/86 


695 
795 

895 


serial 
serial 
serial 


soon 
soon 
soon 


yes(255) 

yes(255) 
yes(255) 


no 
no 
no 


no 
no 
no 


soon 
soon 
soon 


Data Chief 


10 
20 


12/86 
12/86 


899 
999 


serial 
serial 


soon 
soon 


*2*C60) 
*2*<120) 


*2*C60) 
*2*C120) 


yes 
yes 


*4* 


Lt. Kernal 


20 


12/86 


899 


64 expan. 


yes! 


*3*C160> 


yes(IO) 


soon 


*4* 


Device 9 
The Vault 


10 


12/86 


S 600- 
900 


serial, IEEE 
fast serial 


soon 


yes(256> 


yes(IO) 


no 


yes 


NOTES. 

*1* Discontinued; used prices vary. 
*2* Hard drive is partitioned into 170K segments. 
*3* Sixteen <16) subdirectories per logical device. 
*4* Works with REL file version but not older random 


file version. 





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If you've been following this column for 
very long, you know one tiling: it's hard to 
keep up with copy protection on Commodore 
computers. When it comes time to make a 
backup copy of the latest, greatest game or 
productivity title, you need the best tools you 
can get. The best we've seen to date is 
SuperKit from Prism Software. 

SuperKit is a copy program for a Commodore 
64 or C128 in 64 mode and one or two 1541 or 
1571 drives or close clones. (It seems to work 
fine with our FSD-1.) If you use a 1571 it will 
run only in single-sided 1541 mode. Prism 
plans a separate 1571 copy program for the 
future. 

There arc so many tools on this disk that it 
takes up both sides of a 1541 flippy. This disk 
includes both single drive and two-drive fast 
normal copy routines, single and two-drive 
nibble copiers, a fast file copier, a single drive 
Super Nibblcr copier, the Disk Surgeon 
parameter copier, an error scanner, a disk 
editor, a GCR sector editor {!), Prism's 
SuperDOS fastloader, and an autoboot maker. 
All for $29.95! That's what I call value! 

The normal copiers and nibblcrs are fast and 
reliable, and the two-drive copier plays some 
hot rock'n'roll as it copies! These copiers and 
nibblcr copiers are "smart" and will copy only 
sectors that actually contain data. You are 
usually safe just going with the defaults and 
letting them take care of business, but if you 
want to mess around with the settings you can 
control the tracks copied, track increment, 
number of sync bytes, header gap length, sector 
gap length, header block length, and whether 
or not you want the copy verified. Remember, 
these are the simple copiers on this disk! If all 
that confused you, just hit RETURN and let it 
copy by itself. Those options are there for 
experts only. 



The file copier is very nice all by itself. It 
lets you scratch files, read the BAM, and even 
get to deleted files. It's fast, and flashes by 
the file data on the screen as it copies, which 
is at least entertaining. 

The Super Nibblcr is a heavy-duty copy 
program which runs on only a single drive. 
Besides being able to copy programs with 
heavy protection, this copier is the one you'll 
use to make a backup of SuperKit itself. Yes, 
SuperKit does copy itself, but the copies you 
make will nol back themselves up. This "single 
generation" backup capability is something we 
first saw in Ditto from Cardinal Software, and 
I personally think it's a great solution to the 
copy protcction-vs-piracy issue. 

Additional tools for the pro include the error 
scanner, which simply reports which DOS 
errors occur on which disk sectors. The sector 
editor is okay, and even includes a m/1 
monitor. I still prefer Peek-A-Byte, but the 
advantage of this one is that it is included on 
the SuperKit disk and you don't have to switch 
back and forth to use it. 

The GCR editor is unique to SuperKit. I 
don't think I've ever seen another. This is 
definitely for pros only, and if you don't know 
what OCR means then you'll never need this 
editor. But if you do know, this could be a 
powerful tool for you to have. 

The SuperDOS fastloader comes in three 
varieties for various applications. I'll be frank 
and admit I haven't played with them much. 
To be most useful, I think a fastloader needs to 
be in ROM somewhere so it doesn't get wiped 
out by every other program you load. Prism 
has SuperDOS coming on a ROM chip, and I'll 
take a closer look when that's available. In the 
meantime, you might want to play around with 
the versions on this disk. 

The last utility is an autoboot creator which 
will covert your programs to an autobooting 
SuperDOS format. 

SuperKit's Sector Surgeon is a parameter 
copier. For extremely heavily copy-protected 
programs, a parameter copier is often the only 
way to copy the program. Here's a brief 
explanation of how they work: As a copy- 



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protected program loads, it checks for certain 
disk errors, or false data, or encryption. If it 
doesn't find what it's looking for, it aborts the 
load and may even nastily inform you that you 
arc a scum-sucking pirate who doesn't deserve 
to coexist on the same planet with honest, hard- 
working programmers. Anyway, sometimes the 
only way to get around all this is to actually 
rewrite She program so that it no longer looks 
for anything fancy, and just gets on with the 
process of loading. This is what parameter 
copiers do. They actually replace the portion 
of the software that checks for copy protection 
with innocuous, safe code. The result is that 
the copy runs like the original, but it no longer 
checks for copy protection as it loads. Thus, it 
is not only copied, it is de-protected! This 
means that a program that has been "busted" 
with a parameter copier may be copied over 
and over again with a simple copy program. 
The copy protection is gone. The downside of 
this method is that you have to develop a 
parameter specifically for each and every 
program you want to copy. This requires the 
frequent updating of parameters to keep up 
with the latest releases. 

SuperKit's Sector Surgeon includes 400 
paranieters on the SuperKit disk, which is an 
incredible number. (Some parameter copiers, 
like Kracker Jax, charge S19.95 each for disks 
which contain only about 100 parameters each 
and nothing else.) Periodic updates will be 
available from Prism on a regular basis. Their 
first parameter disk will include the first 
known parameters for the Pocket series from 
Digital Solutions. The Sector Surgeon is an 
excellent parameter copier and is easily by 
Itself the equal or better of any parameter 
copier I've seen. 

SuperKit's manual is in terribly small print 
and is a real pain to read. But all the 
information is there, and the back half of. the 
manuai_ is devoted to a terrific history of copy 
protection on Commodore machines written by 
Rob Vaughn. Even if you don't buy SuperKit 
you ought to borrow the manual from 
somebody and read this. It's great. 



Best of all, Prism is extremely sensitive to 
their customers' complaints and suggestions. 
They seem to be dedicated to making sure that 
SuperKit remains the very best disk copy 
program for the Commodore 64. That counts 
for a lot. 

We don't hand out five-star ratings much. A 
product has to go way beyond the call of duty 
to get one. We gave our only other five-star 
copier rating to Fa.st Hack'em when it came 
out for its innovative programming of the 1541 
drives to act as a stand alone copy machine. 
SuperKit won't do that. But what it does do is 
give you all the tools you need to copy just 
about any program on the market, and much 
more. It's an excellent value, and a five-star 
program. 

SuperKit is $29.95 (+S3 shpg.) from: Prism 
Software, 401 Lake Air Dr., Suite D, Waco TX 
76710, 817/751-0200. 

An Amiga version of SuperKit with a full load 
of extras will be available soon for S29.95. 




Next issue is our Product Roundup of over 2000 
C64. CI 28. and Amiga products, including 
copiers. In Issue #15, Dr. Richard Immers, 
author of Inside Commodore DOS. will be taking 
over Copy Corner. He'll be digging deep into the 
topic of copy protection and commercial copiers 
for all three Commodore computers. We can 
imagine no one more uniquely qualified to keep 
you up-to-date than Dick. Look for his column 
starting in issue #151 



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44 



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by Robert J. Mical 



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Hi. I'm RJ Mical, one of the people who 
created the Amiga computer. Mark and Bonn, 
the editors of this magazine, have daringly 
invited me to wax Amiga-esque for you folks. 
The sane among you won't want to read this 
article, and should stop now. To those of you 
who intend on reading this article: well then, 
wax I will, until your foreheads are shiny. 
Ready? 

As I understand it, the goal of Info magazine 
is to get real information into the hands of its 
readership. I thought about that, and decided 
that I might best contribute to this noble effort 
by revealing to you one of the least known, 
most interesting facts about the Amiga; the 
secret of how we created the Amiga computer. 

You might be surprised to learn the truth 
about this. Many people think that wc worked 
long and hard to create the Amiga, but that's 
not so. Actually, it was very easy to create the 
Amiga; we did it in one afternoon. Impossible, 
you say? Well it's true. We were able to pull 
off this fantastic feat because we had access to 
an amazing device known as the Amiga 
Joyboard. Let me tell you about it ... The 
Joyboard was created in 1983 by a company 
named Amiga Computer, Inc., a company 
which ostensibly made computer game 
peripherals such "as joyboards and joysticks. 
The joyboard was in fact a joystick designed to 
be stood on. It was great fun to play skiing 
and surfing games using the joyboard, and 
seriously fun with Olympic sports games that 
required a lot of running in place, though of 
course these were usually more exhausting than 



Kids loved the Amiga joyboard. Suzy 
Chaffee — you might remember her as Suzy 
Chapstick -- loved the joyboard too, Suzy was 
(and probably still is) an excellent skier. She 
appeared on morning news programs and at toy 
fairs playing a skiing game to demonstrate the 
Amiga joyboard. She wore ski clothing, 
carried poles, and had some fun pretending to 
ski on the joyboard. We had some fun 
watching her do this. 

Somewhere in the Amiga building there still 
floats a trophy that had been awarded to Suzy 
but which she abandoned in our offices. The 
last time I saw her I reminded her of this 
trophy, but she shook her head no and that 
statue has haunted us since. It looks like a 
hood ornament from a 50's car on acid. I 
thought I'd finally buried it for good when I 
left Amiga, but it has craftily unearthed itself 
since. I'd made the mistake of not burying it 
with a joyboard at its side. But while the 
public watched Suzy balance on a joyboard, in 
the dark back rooms of Amiga's main building 
the Amiga team used the joyboard for an 
altogether different purpose. Wc used it to 
play The Zen Meditation Game. 

The object of this game was to sit completely 
motionless on the joyboard for as long as 
possible while contemplating the complete 
nothingness of the vast emptiness of the 
immaterial void, or something like that. If you 
reached nirvana you got big bonus points. I've 
known some people who played this game very 
well, even without the benefit of a joyboard. 
It was one of the greatest games ever made. 
OK, so maybe it wasn't exactly one of the 
greatest games ever made, but it had its 
moments. We created the Amiga computer 
while playing this game. Imagine this scene 
from the early days of Amiga: 

We sat motionless atop high chairs with eyes 
closed and hands and fingers raised in 
enlightened poses. Our legs were crossed, and 
beneath our bottoms were Amiga joyboards. 
There was a faint hum in the air, the thought 
song of machine and man. It was our chant, 
our mechanized mantra; we were all deep in 
meditation. A nearby dog barked, and its 



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essence was Buddha nature to our system- 
softened minds. \Vc were playing the Zen 
Meditation Game. 

Almost ail of the Amiga people were there to 
play: art, sales, marketing, accounting, 
manufacture, hardware, and software. Even 
Mitchy the dog was poised in balance with its 
little paws held forward. The room was 
darkened and scented just lightly with the 
fragrance of lotus flower blended with whiffs 
of rice cake and coffee burning at the bottom 
of the coffee pot. There was a noticeable lack 
of cigarette smoke in the air. A gentle breeze 
blew from a fan in the doorway. 

To digress for a moment: boy did we need 
fans in those days. All the equipment we had 
jammed in those rooms threw off a lot of heat. 
The people who worked there slowly cooked as 
the day went by, so we always had fans 
running to move the air around. This type of 
ventilation system is also called CONVECTION 
OVEN. If you want to understand what it was 
like to create the Amiga computer, you have to 
understand the concept of convection oven. 

And as long as I'm already digressing, allow 
mc to digress more wildly: the RJ which is my 
moniker is short for Robert Joseph, in case you 
were wondering (if you weren't wondering, 
skip the rest of this paragraph). In the old 
days before I moved to California I used to be 
known mostly as Bob, but when I went to 
California to help build the Amiga I became 
one of four Bobs in the Amiga software team. 
During the first week that we worked there 
together so many people came in the room and 
said "Hey, Bob" that we ail got whiplash, so the 
boss got to be Bob while suddenly the rest of 
us became Rob, RJ, and Kodiak. That's 
Kodiak as in the Kodiak bear. And for good 
reason. 

But I digress. So there we were, all of the 
Amiga people meditating together in the same 
room with our eyes closed (if you didn't 
know, this is what most Silicon Valley people 
do for a living). Perhaps it was the wine that 
made one of us think: Well, joysticks are fine, 
but how about if we created a computer too? 
This seemed like a reasonably good idea, so 
everyone started dreaming about the Perfect 
Computer, 

A short while later, refreshingly cooi winds 
started to rise from the doorway and the air 
began to glow with a pearly light. We started 
to feel transcendental. Through the door came 
a tall gentle man surrounded by a soft glow 
Dave Morse, Amiga's fearless leader. Our 
thirst was quenched and our fears were 
^assuaged. We floated up off our joyboards. 
I he Amiga Computer is done'" Dave 
exclaimed, "Let's call it a day." 

And that's all there was to it. Easy eh'' You 
could do it too, honestly. To this day, none of 
the Amiga people has ever come out of that 
trance. Most (80% so far) simply floated away 
I miss them. Some (20%) are still chanting I 
niiss them too. It was a splendidly superb time 
those Amiga days, the days of the Busy Guy ' 



V 



I left Commodore by choice in January 1986, 
and have been doing work with the Amiga ever 
since. I've worked on system stuff and games, 
and I've done some writing and some talking 
too. Currently, I'm working on my Electronic 
Arts game. It's coming along delightfully well; 
I hope you enjoy playing it as much as I've 
enjoyed creating it. I don't have an ETA yet. 
Real Soon Now, as we say in the industry. 
Everything that's being worked on in Silicon 
Valley will be available Real Soon Now. 

I'm sticking with the Amiga, keeping the 
faith. 

This article, by the way, is dedicated to all 
Amiga owners, especially those of you who 
paid something (anything, even if sweat) for 
your computer. As I have noted many times, it 
is obvious to me that you are among the most 
intelligent people in the world. 

I am delighted and proud that you have 
chosen to own an Amiga. We poured our 
hearts and souls into the making of that 
machine. The Amiga is the most powerful 
personal computer around. But we wanted 
more than just power. We tried to create a 
computer environment that would be useful 
and accessible to everyone, not just engineers. 
We tried to build a computer that would enrich 
and entertain. I hope we succeeded. Time will 
tell. Hang in there, keep the faith. And tell, 
time, tell! Perhaps you think I've been kidding 
about some or all this. Not true. 

Most of you have probably never seen a 
Guru Meditation alert (ahem), but if you have 
perhaps you can imagine how Zen Meditation 
would lead to Guru Meditation, and how Guru 
Meditations can lead to Zen Meditation. 
Actually, by its purest definition, Guru 
Meditation is a state of mind in which many 
Amiga users find themselves. Double entendre 
intended. 

And regarding Suzy Chaffee, I visited Amiga 
yesterday after I wrote the paragraph above 
about Suzy's abandoned trophy, I have 
reclaimed (with permission) Suzy's trophy for 
my own now. It's here before me. Get this: 
she won it for heroic skiing in the Hawaiian 
Tropic Celebrity Pro-Am, Brcckenridge, 
Colorado. Hmm, Suzy, if you ever want this 
back please just let me know. Until then, such 
historiata should not be neglected, especially 
with the spirit of Suzy's balancing act being 
relived every day by the folks who walk the 
Commodore corridors. 

And regarding how I feel about the Amiga- 
hey, you can never tell, I might be just 
kidding. And now you must excuse me for I 
hear the Guru calling and the Guru is only so 
patient. Later! Control-Amiga-Amiga. 

Autobiographical Note: I spent yean learning 
and gallivanting, then travelled, then did logic. 
special effects and management stuff for 
Hiltiams Electronics, the excellent arcade game 
maker in Chicago. Then I moved to California 
and co-designed the Amiga, especially the Gels 
animation system and Intuition, the user inter facp 
system, ' 



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COMMODORE 64 MIDI 



If you're into music synthesis, you probably 
know that MIDI is a set of guidelines designed 
to provide compatibility between music 
synthesizers, drum machines, other electronic 
devices and computers. Since it was proposed 
as a voluntary standard for instrument makers 
just three years ago, MIDI (which is an 
ancronym for Musical Instrument Digital 
Interface) has dramatically altered the way 
professionals approach music because it 
automates just about everything except 
creativity. But did you know it's a boon to 
amateurs as well? 

Unlike a tape recorder, MIDI doesn't record 
the sound itself. It records the digital 
instructions that make electronic devices do 
whatever they are designed for, and those 
devices along with the computer (if one is 
used) must be present and connected each time 
the music is played. Surprizingly enough, there 
arc a number of advantages to this, one being 
that MIDI systems are modular and in many 
cases, different brands of instruments can be 
substituted without the need to alter MIDI 
instructions, which permits upgrading a system 
as one's needs (or means) expand. It also 
means that music can be pre-recorded along 
with things like stage lighting, saved to disk, 
and played back later in a recording studio or 
as part of a live performance. Last but not 
least, it also means that music education 
software and musical accompaniments can be 
used with MIDI music systems. 

NO PRACTICE?! 

One of the least-k own advantages of MIDI 
accrues to the aspiring musician as she or he 
no longer has to spend years developing 
technical proficiency on an instrument. That's 
not to say that you'll become an instant 
Liberace or that there aren't any trade-offs, 
but the drudgery of repetitive practice that 
stops so many potential musicians from 
marching to their own drum beats is 
practically eliminated with a computer- 
controlled MIDI system. Sure, some keyboard 
technique is required, and an understanding of 
electronics and orchestration can come in 



mighty handy, but the process of acquiring 
those skills is far removed from that most 
dreaded of all musical squelchers, practice. 
How many times have you heard someone wish 
out-loud that they'd stuck with the music 
lessons their folks tried to foist upon them? 

The secret to MIDI and this virtual 
elimination of practice (at least for the hobby 
musician) lies in the nature of electronic sound 
production. Since musical pitch and timbre 
(any particular type of sound) are made and 
stored separately, they can be manipulated 
separately. Music can be recorded (actually 
MIDI data is stored) in several ways: either by 
entering symbols on a staff with the joystick, 
by playing live (very slowly if you want, one 
voice at a time) on a MIDI-conncctcd 
keyboard, or in step-time by pressing a key on 
a Synth and then indicating its duration by 
pressing some other key. With the last two 
methods, you can record musical parts that you 
want different instruments to sound (all the 
way through a piece or by phrase) one after 
the other. These parts arc then added together 
after the fact and sped up for playback. With 
an appropriate MIDI set-up, what sounds like a 
group of different instruments playing together 
can be orchestrated in this manner — a jazz 
band, a rock group or even a symphony 
orchestra. It's only if you want to perform 
live with pre-recorded accompaniments that 
you need any real facility on a keyboard, and 
even then, it's nothing like playing a piano or 
organ because synths make fat sounds and you 
don't need as many. 

MIDI HARDWARE 

A MIDI system can be as simple as a C64 or 
128 connected to a single multi-timbral 
synthesizer (sec the Amiga music article in this 
issue for a description of the Casio CZ-101) or, 
with some limitations, a computer with as 
many devices -- synthesizers, keyboard 
samplers, drum machines, mixers, reverb units - 
as your budget permits. 5-pin DIN MIDI 
cables chain devices together and to a C64 or 
128 by use of a MIDI interface that plugs into 
the RS-232 port. MIDI instructions (upon 
which MIDI software is founded) make it 
possible to communicate with these devices 
individually or as a group by using 16 separate 
channels that carry various types of messages. 



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MIDI SOFTWARE 

Software is needed with a MIDI system 
controlled by a computer, and just as word 
processors differ from each other, so do MIDI 
composition programs (which, by the way, can 
be thought of as music processors). Also like 
word processors, there are two distinct types: 
those intended for the more serious user which 
are more elaborate and offer greater control, 
and those that are geared for casual or hobby 
use. Either way, there are four kinds of MIDI 
software: music composition and performance 
programs, synthesizer patch and librarian 
programs, music education programs, and 
programs that collaborate with a dot-matrix 
printer to produce sheet music. While some are 
available for the C128, all types are out there 
for the C64 and they, of course, can be used 
on the C128 as well in C64 mode. Let's take a 
look at a few from the first two categories. 

MIDI NOTE EDITORS 

As you might guess from the name, note 
editors let you work with standard music 
notation. The primary method of entering 
music with them is to use a joystick to pick up 
and drag music symbols from a menu to a 
musi_c staff. While not as sophisticated in 
detail as music sequencers (and therefore easier 
to use), note editors can provide hours of 
enjoyrnent for amateur musicians in both 
recording and performance situations. 

MUSIC SHOP FOR MIDI 

This is one of the nicest little MIDI note 
editors available for the C64. Screen displays 
are very well-done with clean notation and 
changeable colors. Whole to 32nd notes and 
rests may be entered on a single staff, the 
grand staff or in 4-parts with treble or bass 
clef on any staff. Music is entered either with 
the joystick or in step-time from a MIDI- 
connected synth keyboard. Eight voices are 
available and they can be transmitted over 
four MIDI channels with presets (sound 
location numbers) assigned to each. Music can 
be synced to a drum machine in 24 or 48 
PPQN, using optional bar lines and 1st and 2nd 
repeats, and lots of music files are included on 
the disk. Tempo is fixed throughout a song 
but key signatures are alterable. Simple editing 
features include capture, cut, copy, paste and 
clear, and there's even a utility for printing 



sheet music. The Music Shop ($99.95) was one 
of the first C64 programs to incorporate pull- 
down menus, windows and dialog boxes. It's 
available from Passport Designs, 625 
Miramontes St, Half Moon Bay CA 
94019,415/726-0280 

MUSIC SYSTEM 

The Music System by Firebird (S39.95) for 
the C64, is a SID note editor. It is menu- 
driven and consists of two modules, one with 
which you can enter notes one at a time or 
record 3-part music in real-time from the C64 
keyboard, and the other which is a very 
powerful design and modification section for 
SID-produced sounds. With it comes an offer 
to upgrade to The Advanced Music System 




(AMS, another $40) and the instruction manual 
for both programs. AMS lets you record tracks 
by_ playing on a MIDI-connected keyboard 
(with a S.I.E.L. or Passport interface) in up to 
six voices, setting the MIDI output channel on 
the keyboard to the one you want it to be 
played back on. Also included arc program 
modules for editing music notation, a linker to 
chain files together (which is a must), and a 
routine that prints music with each voice on a 
separate staff. Files created with the 
introductory program are compatible. Icons, 
pull-down menus, windows and input boxes 
make this an attractive, easy to use music 
composition program and I recommend it to 
people interested in SID-made music as well as 
MIDI. Contact Firebird Inc., at 71 North 
Franklin Turnpike, Waldwick NJ 07463 
201/444-5700 



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MUSIC STUDIO 

Beautifully coordinated colors arc used to 
indicate notes played by different instruments 
using the SID chip in Music Studio (S34.95), 
which has been billed more as a C64-internal 
music composition program than MIDI. While 
not wcll-documcntcd, it does have a limited 
MIDI-implementation; MIDI data is sent over 
channel ! and presets set manually on the 



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Synth itself, which means that everything will 
play with one instrument sound. It offers a 
music printing option and performs with 
Passport and compatible MIDI interfaces. 
Music Studio can provide a good introduction 
to music notation and is a viable transition to 
MIDI, especially if you already have it. 
Activision, 2350 Bayshore Frontage Rd., Mtn 
View CA 94043 415/960-0410 



MIDI MUSIC SEQUENCERS 

Generally, MIDI sequencers are for the more 
serious musician. They do not use standard 
music notation for a couple of reasons. Not 
everyone reads it, MIDI data is numeric, and 
complex screen displays can interfere with the 
accuracy of musical timing in playback. 
Realize that sooner or later, you'll end up 
working with numbers with a sequencer. 



DR.T'S SEQUENCER 

If functionality without any funny-business 
sounds good to you, take a couple of 
synthesizers and call Dr.T in the morning. His 
C64 Keyboard Controlled Sequencer (Version 2, 
$150) lives up to the promise of MIDI and 
offers three ways to enter sequences, by 
playing notes or chords in real- or step-time 
from MIDI-connected synths or by typing data 
from the computer keyboard. Once entered, 
you're privy to straight-forward displays of 
MIDI events (to a maximum of 3550, or 35 
sequences, which represent your music) that 
can easily and individually be altered with the 
64's full-screen editor. Sequences may be 
copied or moved in all or part, transposed, 
auto-corrected, ovcrdubbcd and merged; they 
can be played backwards, or inverted in pitch, 
duration or velocity. Control sequences arc 
used to combine sequences into songs in a 
variety of ways with examples provided on 
disk and in the documentation (which is very 
detailed and full of good musical ideas). MIDI 
mode changes can be inserted in song files and 
things like vamping and echo effects produced 
quite easily, once you get the hang of it. 

Dr.T offers 100% trade-in allowance for C64 
program owners to upgrade to his C128 
Keyboard Controlled Sequencer ($225.00). It 
can read files saved by the C64 version and 
store 128 sequences and almost 12,000 notes. 
While the 64 version was recognized as one of 
the most professional MIDI sequencers 
available for that model, the 128 version offers 
all of its power and more. Among other 
things, you can hear the music and sec the edit 
screen concurrently, rescale dynamic ranges, 
add randomness with permutations and 
transpositions, and sync to any device that 
reads SMPTE and sends MIDI song-pointer and 
clock data. 

Dr.T's sequencers are compatible with 
Passport and Sequential Model 64 MIDI 
interfaces as well Dr.T's own Model-T ($90). 
Patch librarian programs (sec below), and disks 
of music ($30 each) that work with either 
sequencer are also available. Dr.Kcys provides 
prerecorded sequences in styles like blues, rock 
& roll, and Latin rhythms that you can use in 
songs or play along with live; the Bach 
Songbook features 20 of J.S.'s masterpieces. 
Contact Dr.T at 66 Louise Rd., Chestnut Hill 
MA 02167, 617/244-6954 



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SONUS' SUPER SEQUENCER 

This newcomer, the C128 Super Sequencer 
($275.95) from SONUS, is a powerful yet 
attractive, easy to use program that offers two 
modes of operation, sequence or song. Menus 
at the bottom of the screen show the 16 
commands available in sequence mode, for 
instance, which are accessed by pressing the 
function keys normally, shifted, with the 
control key, or with shift/control. Music can 
be recorded in real- or stcp-tinic at 24, 48 or 96 
pulses per quarter note (PPQN) and played 
back in any. Multiple clock selections include 
click out, MIDI drum in and out, and tape 
click in and out, provided they are supported 
by your Passport, Sequential or Syntech MIDI 
interface. 

Mid-screen displays simulate tape recorder 
counters for record and playback, including 
fast-forward and reverse, live mute/unmute 
and_ punch. After recording, you can set the 
beginning or end of a sequence (to chop off 
unwanted material), and it can be named, 
transposed or the tempo altered, appended, 
erased or shifted to create a rest at the 
beginning. Sequences may be arranged in up 
to four separate songs (called a set) of up to 24 
elements each, all resident in C128 memory. 
Mod-wheel and velocity sensitivity are 
supported and data for both can be stripped to 
free memory. The CI28 version has a built-in 
system-exclusive librarian for saving 

synthesizer program information (sounds) to 
disk, and numerous other features for detailed 
control of musical input and MIDI data 
editing. 

,„' l^^^*^"'' ^^'^^ ^he C64 Super Sequencer 
($225.95) but fewer features arc offered due to 
less available memory. SONUS has a 
sophisticated line of MIDI products for 
Commodore musicians including Yamaha DX 
and Casio CZ sound disks and librarians (see 
below for Casio), event editors and MIDI 
J?An n-f^^' '^^^'^ newest release is MidiTech 64 
$99.93), an elaborate MIDI system-exclusive 
ibranan and diagnotics program. Contact 



SYNTECH MIDI STUDIO 

Functionally and visually (except for screen 
colors), Syntech's C64 MIDI Studio appears to 
me identical to the SONUS sequencer, and 
rumor has it that some of the principals left 
Syntech earlier this year to form a new 
company. 

As you read this, remember that this program 
works in C64-mode while the SONUS sequencer 
discussed above operates in CI28-modc with 
twice the memory. Because of that, MIDI 
Studio loses features rather than functionality. 
Missing are the system-exclusive librarian, mod- 
wheel and velocity or after-touch tracking, 
several editing features including transpose and 
shift, and tape sync. It will accomodate one 
song of 12 sections in memory and it looks to 
be a nice alternative for MIDI novices as it 
retails for $79.95. Since I don't have the Sonus 
C64 sequencer I can't compare them. Syntech 
Corporation, 5699 Kana Road, Agoura CA 
91301, 818/704-8509, offers other Commodore 
MIDI software, Casio CZ and Yamaha DX 
librarians and sounds (on disk or RAM 
cartridge), MIDI interfaces and Thru boxes, 

PASSPORT DESIGNS MIDI 

The difference between these two programs is 
whether you want to make 4 or 8 channel 
(voice) music. MIDI/4 plus retails for S99 95 
MIDI/8 for $149.95 (and MIDI/4 owners can 
upgrade for S35). Both are superbly organized 
and documented sequencing programs that 
oiler real- or step-time recording down to 32nd 
note triplets with punch in and out editing 
overdubs and controller sensing of key 
velocity, pitch bend, preset changes, aftertouch 
and modulation. A single-step playback 
leatures lets you edit each beat in 24 
increments. Like Passport's MIDI interface 
these programs arc becoming recognized as 
standards in the music industry For 
inlormation on their extensive C64 MIDI 
products (which include music education 
software), contact Passport Designs, Inc 625 



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SYNTHESIZER LIBRARIANS 

Some music synthesizers come equipped with 
sounds the others would kill for (Yamaha's DX- 
7 for example). But even the greatest sounds 
can wear thin and free-standing MIDI librarian 
programs provide a means of creating and/or 
transferring new sounds (also called patches or 
programs) into synth memory where they 
remain even when powercd-off, thanks to back- 
up battery systems. 

Most synthesizers are programmable and it's a 
good thing, because factory sounds in the Casio 
CZ-101, for instance, are relatively flat and 
uninteresting. But designing and programming 
rich, interesting sounds is a tedious, frustrating 
process which is why many MIDI musicians 
purchase — rather than program — alternate 
sounds from companies like these. 

DR.T'S CZ PATCH LIBRARIAN V2 

Like his music sequencers, Dr.T's CZ Patch 
Librarian (for C64, $100) offers utility over 
flash. The librarian holds three groups of 16 
sounds in computer memory, placed there 
either from the CZ or disk, and lets you 
rearrange and swap them collectively or 
individually, sending them to the CZ's internal 
memory and RAM cartridge if you have one. 
While not especially easy to use, the patch 
editing program lets you see and change each 
and every numerical parameter of a CZ sound, 
and play sequences composed with Dr.T's MIDI 
sequencer to test them out. 14 files of 16 
patches each come on the program disk, giving 
you a tidy 224 new sounds to play with. 
Contact information shown above. 

SONUS CASIO LIBRARIAN 

The new SONUS C64 Casio Librarian and 
patch editor ($129.95) operates in a manner 
similar to their sequencers, using onscreen 
menus for function key commands. With this 
information always present, it's easier initially 
and for the occasional user to move and swap 
the sounds stored in banks, but the trade-off is 
that only two banks of 16 sounds each can be 
put into computer memory at one time. 10 
files of 16 new sounds each (160 total) arc 



provided on the program disk, and again, with 
the patch editor onscreen help and less in 
general to have to remember, I found it easy to 
use, too. SONUS offers a C64 DX21, 100, 27, 
TX7 Support librarian ($139.95) and other 
MIDI products. Contact them at the address 
shown above. 

MIDIMOUSE COLLECTIONS 

MIDImouse sound collections include luscious 
strings, hard hitting basses and percussive and 
alien-type effects that can put some real life 
into your music. Sounds on their Casio CZ 
C64 disk-based collections (4 volumes of 40 
sounds, $19.95 each) must be installed with 
another company's librarian utility, compatible 
programs including Dr.T's, CZ Rider, Passport, 
Triangle Audio and M.S.S. Sounds are also 
available on RAM cartridge (64 sounds for 
$69.96, 128 for $124.95), or on paper Data 
Sheets ($19.95 for 40, multiple discounts 
available). They have collections for Yamaha 
and other synths, too. To get an idea of what 
they're like, order a demo audio cassette tape 
($4). MIDImouse Music, Box 272, 

Rhododendron OR 97049, 503/622-5451. 

QRS MIDI DISKS 

QRS makes pre-recorded music disks from 
their 10,000+ piano roll library, a collection 
that includes Show, Country & Western, Pop, 
Rock, Disco, Classical, Religious, Marches and 
Grammy Winners. Each 6-song C64 disk retails 
for $19.95. They also offer a C64 MIDI- 
interface (it's only MIDI-out, you can't use it 
with composition software) together with six 
sample song disks of classical and 
contemporary hits including Rhapsody In Blue 
as played by the author George Gershwin 
($49.95). These very-listenable products are 
available from Micro-W Distributing, Inc. 
1342B Route 23, Butler NJ 07405, 201/838- 
9027. 

CODA 

Remember that a MIDI system consists of a 
program running on a computer that's 
controlling externally-connected synthesizers, 
drum machine or other devices. Choose the 
software carefully, going for as much control 
as you can handle. 



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Remember, folks, these arc RUMORS, and that 
means that they may or may not be true. 
Don't bother getting mad at us about them; wc 
don't make them up, wc just report them. 

— > We have heard that the 64C is proving so 
popular that it is deeply backordercd even 
though Commodore is running the 64C 
production lines on two shifts. 
--> All of those rumors about the imminent 
death of the C128 may have some basis in fact. 
We have heard that the C128 will be "de- 
eraphasized" to free up production lines for the 
64C and to free working capital needed to 
import Commodore's IBM/PC clones, 
--> The latest word online is that the last C128 
will roll off the lines in December of 1987. 
"> We also hear that the Z80 chip may be the 
only thing missing from an enhanced C64 that 
will offer faster operating speed. It will have 
additional memory, but will apparently access 
it like the 1764 RAM expander, rather than as 
contiguous memory like the C128 docs. 
Whether it will have 80-column capability or a 
numeric keypad is anyone's guess. 
--> The latest rumor from the West Coast 
concerning the new, improved Amiga says it 
will be called the model 2500, will have 2 megs 
of chip RAM and new graphics and sound chips 
that can address two megs, and will have a 
new ZORRO architecture that is IBM/PC card- 
compatible. 

--> On the other hand, the latest rumor from 
the East Coast says the new, improved Amiga 
will have 7 slots, 3 Amiga-compatible and 4 
IBM-compatible. The Sidecar will be built in, 
it will have one and maybe two megs of RAM, 
and cards will be available to upgrade 
internally to a 68020 or 68030 as well as 
allowing the addition of an IBM/PC-AT clonc- 
on-a-card. 

"> The new reduced-cost Amiga may come 
bundled with the famed Commodore 64 
emulation software. The cost will be about 
$495 and it will have version 1.2 of the 
operating system in ROM, but no word yet on 
whether the price includes a drive. 



"> We keep hearing that Sony has a 
box/monitor that displays interlace video (as in 
the Amiga's 640x400 mode) as non-interlaced, 
thus removing the flicker. 

"> Another Sony rumor says that their latest 
full-blown Beta video recorder (the SL-1000) 
will have stop-frame animation capabilities, a 
must feature for Amiga video artists. 

TRUE FACTS 

The title you just read indicates that the 
following information is stuff you can bank 
on, things that we know for certain to be true. 
Just wanted to make that clear. 

--> From what wc hear inside at Commodore, 
even they haven't decided yet what will or 
won't be included in the new Amiga models. 
~> At least some (and maybe most) of the 
engineering work on the new Amiga models is 
being done not in Los Gatos, but in 
Commodore's West German plant, where the 
Sidecar was developed.. 

--> Ashton-Tate was not showing Amiga 
product at the Comdex show, but they did seem 
to be very interested in what everyone else was 
showing for Amy. Hmmmmm.... 
-> The Apple IIGS is in very short supply and 
will probably ship less than 10,000 units this 
year. The problem involves production delays 
and bugs in the IIGS's special chips. 
-> One of the original members of the Amiga 
Development Team says that one possible 
project that was discussed early on and then 
shelved was an Amiga-on-a-card which would 
plug into an IBM/PC system. Though it was 
agreed that such a card is possible, it will never 
see the light of day. 

-> How good is Commodore's PC-10 IBM/PC 
clone? Well, ComputerLand of Canada has 
named it their official PC clone. Our contacts 
there say it is selling like the proverbial 
hotcakes. 

-> We hear that an Amiga hopped up with 8 
megabytes of RAM, a 68020 cpu chip, and a 
ISmHz clock actually ran for about five 
minutes at the Amiga Developers Conference. 
With that kind of turbocharging stretching the 
Amiga's chips well beyond their designated 
specifications, no one reasonably expected it to 
be able to run at all. 

-> It seems that IBM has finally built itself up 
to a level of retail success comparable to that 
achieved by Commodore when they first 
introduced the PET computer almost a decade 
ago. Robert Crowell, chairman of the four- 
store Neeco computer store chain, quoted in 
Computer and Software News, says: "Demand 
for IBM's AT 339 is higher than demand for 
any product I've ever seen since the 
Commodore PET in 1978-79." 



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Roll 2 dice 



RESERVED 

FOR 

FUTURE 

EXPRNSION 



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INFO MANIA: THE GAME 

We know most of you are INFO Maniacs 
already; you just can't wait for the next issue 
of INFO! Now to keep you occupied between 
issues, through those long winter months and 
even longer 1541 load times, INFO proudly 
presents: INFO Mania: The Board Game! 

The object of INFO Mania is to accumulate 
the most INFO star rating points by the time 
the last INFO card is drawn. Along the way 
you'll have problems with your system, learn 
some things about computing, and, we hope, 
have a lot of fun. 

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER 

If you want your INFO Mania board game to 

last a long time, we suggest you encase it in 
plastic before you cut it out. Remove the 
board from the center of the magazine and 
carefully press down a layer of self-adhesive 
clear plastic Contact paper on each side of the 
board. (This can be a very tricky process and 
it's very easy to ruin the board, so be careful!) 
Then cut out the cards on either side of the 
board itself. There are also some game 
markers that you will need to cut out, fold, 
and assemble, as the illustration shows. (You 
will probably have to assemble these before you 
cover the rest with plastic.) We couldn't figure 
out how to bind a pair of dice into the 
centerfold, so you'l! have to provide those 
yourself. If you don't have any dice, this short 
program written in C64/C128 BASIC will 
generate dice rolls for you on either machine: 

10 PRINT "INFO MANIA DICE" : PRINT 
20 N=2 : INPUT "ROLL HOW MANY DICE 

(RETURN FOR 2, TO END)";N 
30 IF N=0 THEN END 
40 T=0 : FOR X=l TO N 
50 R=INT(6*RND(0)+1) 
60 PRINT "ROLL IS:" R 
70 T=T+R : NEXT X 
80 PRINT "TOTAL IS:"T : PRINT 
90 GOTO 20 



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THE RULES 

(1) Everybody picks a marker and places it 
on the RETURN space. If you want, you can 
use plastic pawns or the metal dog, top hat, 
and wheelbarrow markers from Monopoly 
instead. Deal out two INFO cards to each 
player. Deal out more if you want to play a 
shorter game. 

(2) Pick who goes first. This is generally 
whoever owns the game, since he can always 
get mad and go home if he can't go first. Play 
advances to the left. 

(3) Every turn starts with a roll of two dice. 
Move counterclockwise around the board, then 
do whatever it says to do on the space you 
land on. If you roli doubles, you get an extra 
turn. 

(4) Lauding on somebody else: If you land 
on a space occupied by somebody else, you can 
be a nice guy and not do anything to him, or 
be nasty and roll one die and do what it tells 
you to, according to this table: 

1 You take an INFO card from him. 

2 He picks and gives you one of his 
INFO cards. 

3 You pick and return one of his 
INFO cards to the board. 

4 He takes TWO INFO cards from 
you. (Greedy!) 

5 You pick one INFO card from each 
other. (And show what you trade!) 

6 He is Held by the FBI. 
Anytime you pick a card from another player, 
it should be by random draw. If more than 
one player occupies the space you land on, you 
can decide independently what to do to each of 
them. Whatever you decide to do, do it before 
you take the action indicated by the space 
itself. 

(5) The game is over when the last INFO 
card is drawn. The winner is the one with the 
highest total number of stars. In the event of 
a tie, the high-scoring player with the most 
cards wins. 

THE SPACES 

(6) DRAW INFO: When you land on one of 
the three DRAW INFO spaces (All Nighter, 
Upgrade System, or Learn Language) you draw 
an INFO card. You also draw one every time 
you pass the RETURN space where you 
started. 

(7) RND: When you land on a RND space, 
pick a RND/ONLINE card. Follow the 
instructions on the unshaded (RANDOM) 
portion of the card. (The shaded portion 
contains instructions for the ONLINE section 
of the game.) Usually the result of drawing a 
RND card will be LOSE CARD TO LEFT, in 
which case the player to your left will draw an 
INFO card from you at random, RETURN 
INFO CARD, which causes you to return a 
card of your choice to the bottom of the INFO 
stack or TAKE PLAYER'S CARD, which lets 
you pick an INFO card at random from any 








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Other player of your choice. Any other cards 
should be self-explanatory. Return the 
RND/ONLINE card to the bottom of the pile. 

(8) GO ONLINE: When you land on a GO 
ONLINE space, you immediately move your 
marker to the GO ONLINE space of the 
ONLINE section of the gamcboard and draw 
an ONLINE card. Whenever you land on a 
space in the ONLINE section, you pick a 
RND/ONLINE card and follow the instructions 
on the shaded ONLINE portion of the card, 
then return the card to the bottom of the stack. 
On subsequent turns you will roll cither one 
die (if you went ONLINE via the "300 baud" 
space) or two dice (if you went ONLINE via 
the "1200 baud" space). In any event, when 
you reenter the main gamcboard you will go 
back to using two dice. 

(9) GOSUB: If you land on the GOSUB 
space, on your next turn you will move up into 
the Subroutine Loop. You move just like you 
do normally, but you'll notice that every space 
in the Subroutine is a RND space, which can 
make things pretty interesting. The SYSTEM 
CRASH space is the one space on the board 
you want to avoid at all costs, since landing on 
it will cause you to return all your INFO cards 
to the board. 

(10) BONUS SCORE and CODE CRACKER: 
These spaces can give you extra INFO rating 
cards depending on how you toss the dice. 
Roll two dice. If the total is odd, you get to 
draw an INFO card. If even, you blew it. 

(11) INTERRUPT REQUEST: As you pass the 
Interrupt Request space, you must make note 
of whether the dice roll you made for your 
move was even or odd. If even, you continue 
on with your turn. If odd, your move is 
interrupted and you have to stop and end your 
turn. This will keep you from zooming past 
RETURN and grabbing an INFO card on 
about 50% of your moves. If you "forget" to 
check for an Interrupt Request as you pass by 
and nobody has called you on it by the time 
the next person rolls the dice, congratulations! 
You have just gotten by with cheating. 

(12) HELD BY THE FBI: Only really good 
(and really irresponsible!) hackers get held by 
the FBI. There is an "Informant" card in the 
RND/ONLINE cards that you can keep and 
hold to get out of this space. Otherwise vou 
will have to roll doubles to get out, or return 
an INFO card to the stack to get out. You try 
for doubles first, then return an INFO card to 
get out if that doesn't work. You then move 
whatever you rolled. You can elect to stay put 



if you don't roll doubles on your first turn, 
but on your second turn you have to return an 
INFO to get out if you don't roll doubles. If 
you have no INFO cards you get out for free 
on your second try, since the FBI decides you 
can't be much of a hacker anyway. Doubles 
used to get out of FBI do not also count 
towards letting you take an extra turn. 

(13) LOSE A TURN and EXTRA TURN spaces 
are pretty self-explanatory. If you are on a 
Lose A Turn space and you "forget" to skip 
your turn when it comes around, the "cheating" 
rule mentioned in #11 applies. 

(14) GOTO SPACES move you somewhere else 
on the board. Just do whatever the space you 
move to requires. You do not pass RETURN 
when you GOTO, so you don't get to pick an 
INFO card for passing RETURN. 

(15) GO TO BED If you land on this space 
you have to go to bed. Roll one die to see 
what time you go to bed (from I to 6 a.m.) If 
It's before 3 a.m., you are not much of a 
computerist and must return an INFO card to 
the board. But if you are a Super Hacker and 
stay up all night until 6 a.m., you get to draw 
an INFO card. (Return a card on I or 2, draw 
one on 6.) 

(16) READ LATEST INFO When you land on 
this space, you draw a bonus INFO card 

(17) OTHER SPACES There arc other spaces 
that do nothing related to gameplay, and just 
describe something you can do with your 
computer while you wait for your next turn. 

(18) RESERVED FOR FUTURE EXPANSION 
does nothing... .for now! 

HAVE FUN! 

If you run into something that isn't covered 
in the rules, work it out among yourselves. 
Develop your social skills. Heaven knows, if 
you're a dedicated computerist, you need the 
practice! 

That's all there is to it! We hope you have 
lots of fun playing INFO Mania. We'd 
appreciate your feedback on the game, and 
whether or not you'd like to sec us bring you 
more "fun stuff" like it. Send your comments 
to: 

INFO Mania 

PO Box 2300 

Iowa City lA 52244 
or send us EMail at our online addresses listed 
in the Reader Mail section. 



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kends hrist fatigue? 
» improves typing speed? 
k improves accuracy* 

»ADDS CLASS TO YOUR 64* 

» BRONZE-SMOKE ACRYLIC! 

» SLIDE-IN REFERENCE CARDS 

AVAILABLE FOR MANY POPULAR 
K INCLUDES 3 STARTER CARDSt 
^ADDITIONAL CARDS FREE IN 

REGULAR ISSUES OF INFO! 
»PATENT PENDING 




BID 



PRODUCTS! 



QtJIk^^p 



WORDPRO III 

GEMINI-ie CODES 

BASIC 2.9 

DOODLE 

LOGO 

SUPERBASE 64 

EASY SCRIPT 

PAPERCLIP (A> 

PAPERCLIP <B) 

COMAL e.l4 

FLIGHT SIMULATOR II 

F-15 STRIKE EAGLE 
















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COMPUSERVE GUIDE 
SPEEDSCRIPT 3.e 
85ie PROURITER CODES 
CP/M PLUS 
BASIC 7.0 <A> 
BASIC 7.6 (B> 
INFOCOM ADVENTURES 
ULTIHA III 
COMMODORE DOS 
AMIGADOS 
ELITE 
VIZAWRIIE 



PLEASE SEND ME 



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ADDRESS. 



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INFO 

PO BOX 2300 

Iowa City. I A S2244 



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amiga Ipuslc: T|je State Of Tbe art 
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by Peggy HErrin^tcut 



STRIKE UP THE BAND- 



Making music on a traditional instrument 

requires a major investment to develop one's 
chops or manual dexterity. You can do that on 
an electronic instrument, too, if you insist, but 
the real advantage of a newfangled music- 
maker is that you don't have to practice 
forever to get musical satisfaction. 

Making music on the Amiga is especially easy 
because it's a powerful computer coupled with 
a flexible, high-quality musical instrument. 
Thanks to computer memory and software, 
making music is a two-step process, with time 
on your side for a change. For most of it, 
you'll work one step away from the final 
outcome, entering notes at your leisure with 
the mouse or slowly playing them into memory 
on an attached piano-type keyboard. This is 
possible_ because unlike acoustic sound, 
electronic sound is produced in two distinct 
parts, pitch being one, and timbre or the 
nature of the sound being the other, so that 
changing one doesn't alter its counterpart. 
Electronic music can be played faster without 
altering the pitch, and parts that were entered 
separately can be played back together without 
any loss of quality. Once you've entered the 
notes, the instruments playing various parts 
can be swapped until you're satisfied with the 
arrangement. 

NOTE EDITORS & SEQUENCERS 

Although standard music notation isn't 
capable of reflecting much that electronic 
music-makers can do, it is used in computer 
music programs because nobody has come up 
with an acceptable alternative. These programs 
are commonly, but not always, called note 
editors. This capability means that after 
you've entered the music, the program provides 
a means of altering pitch and duration, and 
moving or copying notes alone or in groups, 
and a good note editor can save you a lot of 
work. All of the programs described here have 
note _ editors, though one of them, ProMIDI 
Studio, uses numbers instead of standard music 
notation. Note editors also incorporate some 
of the functions from what was the original 
software music manipulator, the sequencer. 



A sequencer lets you do much more than 
copy or paste and add first and second endings, 
which are the features most commonly 
borrowed by note editors. It saves groups of 
notes in separate sections and lets you set them 
up to play in unlimited combinations, AABA 
or AB.A.BC, for example, A sequencer doesn't 
use much computer memory because rather 
than actually rewriting sections in the proper 
order, internal pointers are used to indicate 
which part gets played when. Complex scoring 
can be arranged with a sequencer, as musicians 
familiar with the fugue will appreciate 
immediately. I don't know how true it is, but 
a college professor of mine claimed that J.S, 
Bach -the master of the fugue- had written 
more music than the average person today 
could copy by hand, working eight hours a 
day, five days a week during his entire 
working life. It boggles the mind to think 
what he could have done with ProMIDI Studio, 
the only program mentioned here that has both 
a sequencer and note editor. 

IFF COMPATIBILITY 

Music software is available on all kinds of 
personal computers, but Amiga program 
developers are working on something that's a 
first in the industry. Graphics and music 
developers are trying to put the data produced 
by their programs into a standardized format 
■so that it can be used with their competitor's 
products. It's called the Interchange File 
Format (IFF for short) and so far the graphics 
artists are ahead of the musicians which is, 
interestingly enough, the way it's been down 
through the ages. (Digital sampler makers are 
in on the act, too, sec Info #13 for details.) It 
should be worth the wait because once the 
rough edges and transitions are smoothed out 
(and actually, there aren't that many left), 
Amiga musicians will be able to enter a 
composition with the program of their choice, 
edit and arrange it with another they think 
better suited, print out sheet music with a 
third, and synchronize video images to it with 
a fourth. 

Here are the programs which promise that 
power. 



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DELUXE MUSIC 

One of the most heralded programs for the 
Amiga, Deluxe Music will be available in some 
stores for the '86 holiday season, according to 
Jeoff Brown, its designed and programmer. I 
received a Beta 4 test version in early 
November which was functional except (alas!) 
for the routine that prints sheet music, and at 
press time, it was debatable whether a laser 
print routine would be included or print 
output would all go through Preferences. Laser 
print quality (with 300 dots per inch as 
opposed to 72 on a dot matrix) is vitally 
important to serious musicians, many of whom 
have been anxiously awaiting Deluxe Music 
since it has been billed as a professional 
quality desktop music publishing system. 



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But that's not all it is. Deluxe Music is IFF 

compatible and plays sampled sounds. It has a 
full MIDI implementation, and offers the most 
accurate standard music notation display and 
editing features I've ever seen. In addition to 
those offered by most music programs. Deluxe 
Music notation can be entered in triplets or 
fives, stems can be directed up or down at will, 
and groups can be barred or slurred. Music 
can be entered three ways: (1) with the mouse 
by dragging symbols from a palette on the left 
border of the screen, (2) by placing the pointer 
on a piano-type onscreen keyboard, entering 
single notes or chords and using the function 
keys to change durations, and (3) by playing on 
a MIDI-connected music synthesizer. Parts can 
be entered on separate tracks using a variety 
of clefs, and instrumentation can be changed 
for any voice at bar lines. Lyrics and music 



symbols that the Amiga will ignore during play 
(e.g. guitar tablature) can be placed precisely 
on the printed copy. 

After music is entered, it can be manipulated 
in a variety of ways. Groups of notes can be 
cut, copied, pasted or transposed, their 
durations halved or doubled, their stems 
flipped, and their amplitude (loudness) altered 
from ppp to FFF. Amiga internal sounds can 
be mixed with MIDIcd synthesizer voices in 36- 
note chords (four from the Amiga, 32 from 
synths). I could go on but in short. Deluxe 
Music is a flexible, detailed composition 
program. It has the promise of providing a 
much needed utility for printing professional 
quality sheet music, and is available for $99 
from Electronic Arts, 1820 Gateway Dr., San 
Mateo, CA 94404, 415/571-7171. 



SONIX 

If SONIX looks familiar, that's because it's 
Musicraft, slightly revised. Aegis has added 
MIDI-out to it and rewritten the already 
lengthy documentation. They bought the rights 
to it from Commodore, who, long before the 
Amiga was available, commissioned a company 
called Everyware to write it. And with that 
many people involved, early copies of 
Musicraft slipped through the cracks. I've seen 
four versions, and it has spread so widely that 
there are public domain Musicraft songs on the 
commercial networks. 



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Musicraft has three screens: mouse music 
entry in standard notation that scrolls during 
play, a map of the Ivcys you can play on the 
Amiga keyboard, and a synthesizer screen 
where instruments (previously sampled or 
constructed sounds) can be designed or altered. 
The last version (1.0) saves files in IFF-SMUS 
format. SONIX was demonstrated at a trade 
show in September. Aegis had added another 
screen for MIDI-out, and changed the A,B,C 
and D voice indicators on the composition 
screen to include E,F,G and H to reflect them. 
I don't know if it will mix Amiga sounds with 
those from synthesizers but I know for a fact 
that it won't record music played on a MIDI- 
connectcd synth. 

Many of the editing features were ghosted in 
Musicraft. Among them were cut, copy and 
paste and their absence made music entry 
tedious. Availability of these and others 
should make SONIX super easy to use. But its 
limited MIDI implementation, and lack of 
notation details (like redirecting stems and 
barring notes) coupled with the absence of a 
print utility, don't bode well considering that 
SONIX is functionally quite comparable to 
Deluxe Music. SONIX will be available in 
some markets for Christmas (yes, that's 1986) 
but the price hadn't been determined at press 
time. Contact Aegis Development, 2210 
Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica, CA, 213/306- 
0735, for more information. 

SOUNDSCAPE PROMIDI STUDIO 

ProMIDI Studio is the main module in a 
series of SoundScape products Mimetics will be 
releasing for beginning and professional Amiga 
musicians. Visually, it consists of several 
windows with graphic representations of a 
multitrack tape deck, a couple of digital clocks, 
piano-type keyboards for the Amiga console 
and MIDI-connected synthesizers, and a Patch 
Panel for connecting SoundScape modules 
together so that they can exchange signals. 
Other windows appear as you click on these 
displays. Although it is a full-fledged 
professional MIDI software package that lets 
you record, edit, mix and mingle sequences of 
internally produced Amiga sounds with or 
without those from external synthesizers, it is a 
fine choice for musicians wanting to make 
music with the Amiga atone, because with it 
you can expand gracefully into MIDI later. 

If you've never seen professional MIDI 
software before, you may be overwhelmed by 
ProMIDI Studio at first, partly because there's 



so much going on and partly because it all 
seems so foreign. But if you're serious about 
getting into electronic music, buy it and hang 
in there; I've talked with many users who were 
intimidated initially but by their second or 
third session were extolling its virtues. Those 
who can read music may bemoan the absence 
of standard music notation, but building 
graphics screens does slow a program down, 
and professionals say it's limiting anyway. 
(That's also why many of them arc anxious to 
have Deluxe Music produce sheet music on a 
laser printer.) 



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New SoundScape sampling software that takes 
advantage of the stereo capability of the 
Amiga and has improved editing features is 
now being shipped with the sampler (S99) and 
is available free to registered owners. And a 
version of ProMIDI Studio with SYMPTE will 
be available by the time you read this, which 
should be good news to music video producers. 

Doing justice to a program of ProMIDI 
Studio's calibre in a few hundred words is not 
something I care to attempt in detail. If you 
do go for it, be sure to send in your 
registration card (it's already on version 1.12 
now) as a newsletter is in the works, along 
with free program upgrades and a manual for 
registered developers. ProMIDI Studio is 
available for $149 from Mimetics Corp., PC 
Box 561, Palo Alto, CA 94306, 408/741-0117.) 

MUSIC STUDIO 

This was the first music product out for the 
Amiga and it appears to have been designed 
for the Atari ST and converted in a rush. 
Although a couple of fixes that take advantage 
of the Amiga arc available (one in the public 
domain that converts .song files to IFF-SMUS 
format and vice versa, the other as an upgrade 
from Activision for using sampled sounds), as 
It exists straight out of the box, Music Studio is 
neither IFF nor sample-compatible, although it 
hopefully will be in future releases. No fixes 
arc available for its other shortcomings, 
however, which include unchangeable key and 
tempo throughout a composition. Both can be 

continued on page 62 



I I 




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FUN WITH PC PURSUIT 

by Peggy Herrington 

You can expand your computing and social 
horizons into The Big Time with a modem and 
a terminal program. This equipment connects 
your computer to a telephone, and that's your 
means of participating in The Information 
Age. It enables you to log onto electronic 
Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) and commercial 
networks, and connect your computer to others 
one-to-one. While I agree that that label for 
our society's stage of development — The 
Information Age — is accurate enough, I find 
the term itself so dry and non-descriptive that 
I think you'll be astounded if you take my 
advice and give telecommunicating a try. 
You'll discover a world of ideas and fellowship 
that you never dreamt existed. Nothing 
worthwhile is free, of course, and if you want 
to ride the commercial network wires often 
you'll need a fair piece of disposable income. 
But unlike the networks, BBSs rarely charge 
access fees. BBSs owners, or SYStcm OPerators 
(SYSOPs), devote unbelievable time and energy 
to the maintenance of their boards in a true 
labor of love, and some of them are real gems. 
Until about a year ago, however, we were all 
faced with long distance telephone charges to 
reach boards outside our local calling area, and 
despite the fact that most major population 
centers have hundreds of boards that are 
available for free, there wasn't a great deal of 
intercity communication. That is not the 
situation anymore because PC Pursuit, a service 
of GTE Telenet, has dramatically lowered the 
cost of long distance communication by 
computer. 

NO LONG DISTANCE 

Telenet is a packet-switching service that 
provides telephone links from smaller cities 
into bigger ones across the United States. 
Telenet lines carry digitized data rather than 
voice signals, and most American cities have 
local access nodes; there arc something like 
18,000 of them now. These nodes are nothing 
more or less than local telephone numbers that 
allow computer users across the country to 
exchange information with other computers in 



14 major metropolitan areas without incurring 
long distance telephone charges. The 
metropolitan centers you can presently call into 
are: 

Atlanta Denver Newark Seattle 
Boston Detroit New York Washington DC 
Chicago Houston Philadelphia 
Dallas Los Angeles San Francisco 

Eleven more major markets are scheduled to 
be added to Telenet's list before the end of 
1986. They wouldn't tell me which ones by 
name, although they pretty much go by the 
greatest population. But once these cities are 
online, that will mean a total of 25 that PC 
Pursuit members can access, or call into, from 
all over the country. 

$25 A MONTH 

Telenet was initially established as a service 
for professionals and during business times 
they charge up to $14 an hour to use their data 
lines. But about a year ago, Telenet decided to 
make these lines available at a much reduced 
cost during non-business hours (6PM to 7AM 
weekdays and 24 hours a day on weekends and 
holidays), and they introduced PC Pursuit for 
that express purpose. 

For a flat $25 a month, PC Pursuit 
subscribers can make unlimited calls with their 
computers into these 14 (soon to be 25) major 
markets during non-business hours. No strings. 
And no long distance charges unless you live 
in the boondocks and must call into a nearby 
city with a Telenet access number. For S25 a 
month, PC Pursuit members can connect with 
any computer that will answer the phone in 
any of these cities for as long as they wish 
(well, on weekdays until 7AM at the end that 
initiated the call). There's no limit to the 
number of calls or the amount of connect or 
online time used. 

I know lots of people who could save 
themselves a bundle with PC Pursuit. First 
off, there's my friend who likes to call bulletin 
boards on Sunday afternoons, read the 
messages that were posted since the week 
before and download public domain programs 
for his user group's library — a worthy cause, 
of course, but since he prefers boards in other 
(larger) cities, these Sunday outings cost him a 
couple of hundred bucks a month, and his 
wife, shall we say, is anything but pleased. A 



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family I know that moved here to Albuquerque 
from Philadelphia not long ago, longs to make 
more phone calls back home than they can 
justify. Since they and many of their friends 
own personal computers, PC Pursuit would let 
them and their teenagers communicate with 
family and old friends there without guilt or 
big phone bills. And I know lots of folks on 
the commercial networks who spend hour after 
hour chatting with Significant Others on the 
real-time Citizens' Band radio simulators that 
most networks offer. Each of them pays the 
network's hourly connect fee to do so. Even if 
that's only $4 or S5 an hour each, they must 
spend a small fortune talking with each other 
over a period of time. Provided one of them 
lives in a PC Pursuit major market, they could 
do the exact same thing for $25 a month since 
only the caller needs to join PC Pursuit. 

COMMERCIAL NETWORKS 

speaking of commercial networks, if you sign 
onto one through Telenet now, it might be to 
your advantage to find out (1) if their 
computer{s) are situated in a city served by PC 
Pursuit, and (2) what their connect fees are to 
members who call in from that area code. If 
you simply dial through Telenet normally, it 
costs an extra S2 an hour to use The Well, for 
instance, a network in the San Francisco 'area 
(415/664-2811 by modem). But by joining PC 
Pursuit, you can call into San Franciso through 
Telenet using the special PC Pursuit procedure 
and THEN sign onto The Well for S3 rather 
than S5 an hour. The upshot is that if you log 
onto The Well or any other similarlv accessed 
network for more than 12 hours a month PC 
Pursuit will pay for itself and you can' call 
bulletin boards and friends all over the 
country free! Just remember that any 
computer you call (the one that will answer) 
must be located in one of the major markets 
served by PC Pursuit as established by its 
telephone area code. 

For more information about PC Pursuit call 
(voice) 800/368-4215 from 8AM to 5PM eastern 
time, or use your modem to sign onto their 
free 24-hour information and sign-up BBS at 
800/835-3001 (300 or 1200 Baud, seven data 
bits, no parity, 1 stop bit - 7N1 in jargon) 
Download the text files of detailed infomation 
you'll find online there, including instructions 



on how to join and use the service. And in 
case you do decide to join (there's a $25 sign- 
up fee and you must have a credit card) here 
are some Amiga and C64/I28 bulletin boards 
in the 14 markets served by PC Pursuit now. 
Realize that while I have listed boards that 
were functional at the time this article was 
written, that's no guarantee that they will be 
online by the time you read it. They do tend 
to come and go. Lists of boards across the 
country are available on many commercial 
networks and most boards offer compilations 
of others in their area. Another way of 
finding them is to leave a message or see if the 
SYSOP on the system you're connected with is 
available for live chat and ask for his or her 
recommendations. There are hundreds (maybe 
even thousands) of bulletins boards in these 14 
cities alone and most of them arc freely 
accessible to anyone with an appropriately 
equipped computer. And now with PC 
PURSUIT, reaching them, whether they're 
devoted to computers, matchmaking or some 
topic in between, is no longer prohibitively 
expensive. 

(Editor's note; An excellent and frequently- 
updated list of public BBS systems also appears 
in every issue of Computer Shopper.] 



BBS Tips and Etiquette 

from Miss Peggy 

If you have call waiting service, contact your 
local telephone company for a way to 
temporarily disable it while you're online. The 
tone generated by incoming calls will instantly 
disconnect you from another computer. 

Bulletin boards can handle only one caller at 
a time since the host computer (usually a 
C64/128, Amiga, Apple, IBM-PC or TRS-80) is 
connected to someone's private telephone line, 
which is also why some of them operate only 
at night. As far as telecommunicating with 
text is concerned (as opposed to programs) all 
brands of computers are compatible. In other 
words, your computer can talk to any other 
computer online. 

Expect limited access to most boards on your 
first call and go in at 300 Baud if you aren't 
sure what the system will accomodate. Most 
SYSOPs verify that you're sufficiently sincere 



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to call more than once and many offer various 
'levels' of access to their files and message 
bases. 

Use your own name (not a handle) and 
address when you register, and put them in the 
same form every time. If you use "Joseph 
Jones" one time and "Joe Jones" the next, the 
host computer will think you're two different 
people. Some systems assign Logon IDs and all 
require you to supply a secret password. Write 
this info down and keep it in a safe place. 
You'll need it the next time you sign-on. 

Take the time to post a message, even if it's 
just hello to the SYSOP. (Being friendly and 
knowledgeable might snag you a better access 
level, too.) And once you're familiar with a 
board, upload programs to it — give as well as 
take. It's hard to overemphasize the time and 
energy that SYSOPs routinely invest in their 
boards, not to mention the money, and most of 
them do so as a public service, expecting few 
returns (beyond perhaps a little recognition) on 
their in\ estmcnt. 

Never, ever become a party to pirating 
(illegal distribution) of copyrighted material, 
nor stoop to using obscenity in a public 
message. Lastly, don't go on a CP/M board 
(usually designated as RCPM) unless you know 
what you're doing. 

Telephone 



Or-./ 




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"The last anyone knows for sure, we 
had computers designing computers 
to build computers to build other 
computers. Somewhere along the 
line it got away from usl" 



Location 



Name 



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Atlanta GA 
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Telephone 



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continued from page 53 



overcome by using accidentals and adjusting 
durations but doing Barry Manilow tunes, for 
instance, is a real hassle. And using Append to 
play one song after another can result in some 
strange stuff since all songs play in the key of 
the first one. Other complicating factors are 
that durations arc columnar in effect which 
takes some getting used to, and the 
documentation doesn't explain how to move 
instruments between sound palettes. 

Music Studio's five screens are beautifully 
done with color being used to differentiate 
voices. It's very attractive on a good color 
monitor, decent on a Commodore 1701 or 1702, 
but you can forget it on a monochrome box - 
it shows 16^ shades of green! It uses standard 
music notation and while note stems overlaying 
others on the screen doesn't effect its 
functionality, music printouts don't look as 
good as they could. Music repeats and printed 
lyrics are nice features but the printouts break 
scores any old place (not just at bar lines) 
which isn't so nice. 

An alternate screen lets you compose on the 
grand staff but rather than using notes and 
rests, color-coded blocks arc used in a literal 
representation of tone colors. This can be 
swapped instantly with the main composition 
screen where the music is shown in standard 
notation. For educational purposes, it's real 
handy. 

Mu.sic Studio offers MIDI-out and has several 
Casio CZ-IOl patch programs in the 
documentation for altering the sounds on that 
synthesizer. It was designed and programmed 
by Audio Light, the company that did many 
good programs for the Koala Pad. In view of 
that and versions of Music Studio for other 
computers, I think they could have done a 
better job for the Amiga. It's available for 
$59.95 from Activision, 2350 Bayshore 
Frontage Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 
213/306-0735. 

ADD A LITTLE MIDI MUSIC 

As you've probably gathered, the Amiga can 
control and coordinate another kind of sound, 
those generated by MIDI-conncctcd music 
synthesizers. During the past couple of years, 
MIDI has revolutionized professional music. It 
lets electronic devices (synthesizers, drum 
machines, mixers, etc.) communicate with each 
other, putting them all under the optional 
control of a computer. Among other things, a 
computer can store preprogrammed instructions 



for all of these devices, and strike up the band 
on command. 

If you're thinking about getting a synthesizer 
to fool around with at home, get one that's 
rnulti-timbral, like the Casio CZ-101. Multi- 
timbral means that under program control, a 
synth can play more than one kind of 
instrument sound. The CZ-IOl has four 
octaves of keys about 2/3 the size of those on 
a piano, eight voices total of which four are 
MIDI, and can be purchased used or by mail 
for substantially less than its S495-or-so 
suggested retail price. Whether you get Deluxe 
Music or ProMIDI Studio to use with it depends 
on how serious you arc about music; a number 
of professionals have ProMIDI Studio, 
Fleetwood Mac and Frank Zappa, to name a 
couple, and Chuck Fisher, who recently 
replaced several computers in his professional 
recording studio with a single Amiga and 
ProMIDI Studio. 

All of these programs offer MIDI-out but 
only Deluxe Music and ProMIDI Studio have 
MIDI-in as well. With MIDI-in, music can be 
entered by playing on the keyboard of a MIDI- 
conncctcd synthesizer. Remember: You can 
play very slowly, with one finger if that's all 
you can manage, since increasing the playback 
speed of digitized music doesn't alter its pitch. 
Deluxe Music and ProMIDI Studio will also 
mingle and mix synthesizer voices with Amiga 
sounds, and since the Amiga can play samples, 
It makes a dynamite drum machine (something 
no synthesizer can claim). You'll be amazed at 
the relative ease of making good music with 
the_ Amiga playing drums on its four channels 
while a synth plays different instruments along 
with It. And with the CZ-lOl's four additional 
non-MIDI voices, you can perform live, using 
MIDI sounds as prerecorded backup, which is 
precisely what MIDI was designed for. 

Whether or not you go MIDI, rest assured of 
one thing: the Amiga's speed of operation and 
multitasking, coupled with its ability to play 
sampled and internally generated sounds in 
stereo, (to say nothing of the strength of IFF 
compatibility) makes it the musician's 
computer. Now that software is available to 
capitalize on all that power, no other personal 
computer on the market can touch it - and if 
someone says otherwise, they're just whistling 
Dixie. 



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Down To Business 



a definitive look at business 
and applications software 



PLANNER'S CHOICE 

Activision, Commodore 64/128, Disk 

What's larger than an accountant's ledger, 
more powerful than a solar calculator, faster 
than a #2 pencil, and less expensive than Lotus 
1-2-3? Planner's Choice, the 64/128 spreadsheet 
from Activision, that's what! 

Planner's Choice is a revised version of 
Creative Software's defunct Creative Calc 
spreadsheet. (The company's assets were 
purchased by Activision). This venerable C-64 
spreadsheet now sports additional mathematical 
operators. It also boasts a 128 operating mode 
and the ability to interface with its sister word 
processor, now known as Writer's Choice. 

SPREADSHEETS PAST 

How docs Planner's Choice compare to its 
predecessor? It has a more comprehensive 
manual with a separate multipagc pullout 
which encapsulates most 64/128 operating 
information. Though the same (64 mode) data 
is provided in the old Creative guide, the 
Planner's Choice version is identical or better 
in most instances, A tutorial, complete with 
basic sample data, steps you through every 
program function. 

While Planner's Choice 64 includes additional 
functions (average, count, future/present value, 
payment, max and min), it does not offer any 
additional features (copy, relative, recalc, etc.). 
The screen layout is also the same. Even 
commands listed in the Creative manual, but 
not in Activision's work flawlessly! 

For example, <CTRL 1> alters the border 
color, <CTRL 3> changes the worksheet color 
and <CTRL 5> alters the message row's hue. 
Why not list these color changing capabilities? 
This lapse in the Activision documentation is 
hard to fathom when you consider that the 
same capabilities are listed for the 128 mode. 

There are also a few eniirely undocumented 
commands available. <CTRL S> moves the 
cursor to the upper left corner of the current 
screen, <CTRL ;> moves the cursor one cell to 
the right and <CTRL Q> moves the cursor 
down one cell. More gems may await the 
intrepid explorer. 



by Ted Salamone | 



THE SPECS 

Planner's Choice 64 accomodates worksheets 
of up to 64 columns by 255 rows for a 
maximum of 16,320 cells. The number of 
worksheets is limited only by disk space and 
the size of each sheet. 

Basic functions range from absolute value 
and trigonometric operators to logarithms (base 
10) and exponentiation. The entire list is only 
14 functions strong, which makes Planner's 
Choice an entry level spreadsheet. 

It allows synchronized and unsynchronizcd 
windows, disk operations (directory, format, 
etc.) and auto/manual recalculations, as well as 
global or single cell formatting of text or value 
inputs. 

Other capabilities include cell, row and 
column erasure and copying; relative and 
absolute formula replication, and row/column 
insertion. 

Cursor movement is very flexible. The 
standard arrow keys, several function keys, the 
CLR/HOME key and a GOTO (specific cell) 
function provide excellent cursor positioning 
capabilities. 

Besides ease of learning and use, the main 
strength of Planner's Choice's lies in its ability 
to interface with a companion word processor. 
This capacity, standalone or integrated, adds 
extra depth to what is otherwise an 
unsophisticated program, 

128 WHERE ARE YOU? 

The Planner's Choice disk also contains a 128 
version. It is entirely new; the original Creative 
series was conceived and brought to market 
before the advent of the 128. 

While this review concentrates on 
PC's 64 capabilities, the 128 mode is well worth 
noting. 

The C128 side of the manual is a separate 
entity with it's own unique identity. Different 
sections are devoted to loading, learning and 
using the 128 mode. Only in the reference 
section do both modes mingle. Functions which 
are available only in one version, or which are 
handled differently from one to the other, are 
clearly labelled. 

The 128 provides either a 40-column display 
on a composite monitor or 80 on an RGB or 
monochrome monitor. Screen shots in the user's 
guide reflect this advanced capability, adding 
to the manual's effectiveness. 



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The command structures are slightly different 
from the C64 version. This means users 
upgrading from the 64 program will have to 
relearn a few things. Not too devastating, but 
annoying and somewhat inconvenient. 

While C-128 keys such as HELP. ALT, CAPS 
LOCK and NO SCROLL work, the standard 64 
arrow (cursor) keys do not. They arc replaced 
by the 128 arrow keys. And, of course, the 
numeric keypad is an important asset. 

Pressing HELP pulls up a few screens which 
detail command key uses and various 
functions. Several icons spice up the on-line 
aid, adding some visual impact in the process. 

The NO SCROLL keys toggles on and off. In 
one position the cursor bar remains stationary 
and the lines (rows) scroll by. In the other 
position the bar moves and the lines (rows) 
remain stationary. 

The ALT key moves the cursor from one 
window to another when the window mode has 
been activated. If pressed simultaneously with 
function or other menu option keys it 
suppresses their normal functions. 

Undoubtedly the biggest advantage to the 128 
mode is the extra RAM available for worksheet 
construction. About 60K is free, allowing you 
to build sheets of up to 255 rows by 255 
columns for a total of 65,025 cells. (Compare 
this to a little over 28K free in the 64 mode). 

All command key functions are listed at the 
bottom of the screen, rendering the manual and 
on-line help unnecessary in most cases. Novices 
and casual users will probably be the only ones 
who need to access the documentation after the 
initial learning curve is passed. 

While there are no 128-unique operators, 
there are several differences in commands and 
function keys. Users can blank the entries and 
formats of individual cells or cell ranges, a 
function which replaces the 64 mode erase 
command. More importantly, you can easily 
delete rows or columns. (The 64 version only 
allows row/column insertion). 

SUPPORT 

Registered owners are entitled to support via 
a toll-free telephone hotline and a single 
backup disk. To get the spare disk you just 
send in another SIO.OO and hibernate for the 
winter - it takes 6 to 8 weeks for Activision to 
respond to requests. Don't wait until the disk 
blows to request a backup. 

THE BOTTOM LINE 

Even though the C64 version has seen little 
refinement since its days as Creative Calc it is 



still a viable solution for light users, and the 
128 version now makes it easy for 64 owners 
to upgrade while retaining data. For those on 
the upgrade path. Planner's Choice could be a 
good choice. 

VIZASTAR 128 

Solid State Software, Commodore 128 
Disk/Cartridge, Si 19.97 

There is a productivity program for the 
Commodore 128 with a "one-two punch" that 
separates it from all the rest. It's Vizastar 128, 
the^ Information Processor from Solid State. 
This multifunction program combines a 
flexible, capable database and an extremely 
powerful, quick spreadsheet with stunning 
graphics. 

The_ spreadsheet is Vizastar's primary 
function, the foundation for everything else. 
Though the database and graphic functions add 
a good deal of utility, it's spreadsheet 
capabilities arc reason enough to buy Vizastar. 

THE NICKEL TOUR 

Vizastar 128 is a combination cartridgc/disk- 
bascd application. The cart takes care of copy 
protection, making it easy for users to backup 
the unprotected program disk. (Solid State 
recommends duplicating the master disk). 

This menu-driven, autoboot program gives 
you 80-column output, and supports color 
printers in addition to the usual black & white 
units. The manuals and disk-based tutorials use 
real life examples to drive important points 
home. 

Vizastar is menu-driven, and either the 
Commodore logo key or the ESC key is used to 
activate the menu mode. Once there your 
selection is made by pressing the SPACEBAR 
(to move the highlight), followed by RETURN; 
or you can merely enter the first letter of the 
desired operation. Nothing could be simpler. 

Instead of relying solely on many layers of 
menu options, function keys may be used to 
replace the most-used functions like 
spreadsheet recalculation, scrolling forward 
and backward by screens, and moving to a 
specific cell. Fl and F2 perform two versions 
of the same function, placing a cell within a 
formula. F2 is the absolute (as opposed to 
relative) pointer. Fl also allows quick entry 
edits (math, logical, or text) when the cursor is 
positioned over a filled cell. 

Two function keys arc reserved for a special 
set of Vizastar operations, the automatic 
execution (macro) routines. With this internal 



Down To BTisiness 



cont Lnued 



} 



"programming" capability users can create a 
string of keystrokes for rc-usc. While on the 
subject, standard operations (copy, move, etc.) 
are cut short via the RUN/STOP key. 

IN THE BEGINNING 

After booting Vizastar 128 for the first time 
it is best to load the "Read Me" file, an 
electronic update of operating instructions and 
general information which came into being too 
late for inclusion in the manual. It also details 
changes between Vizastar's 64 and 128 versions, 
useful for those interested in upgrading. 

General enhancements over the C64 version 
include the ability to quickly reach a 
worksheet's boundaries (TAB/cursor key 
combinations) and to perform ascending or 
descending alphanumeric sorts up to 10 levels 
deep. Such a generous upper limit makes its 
easy to set up extremely fine data filters. 

The C12S version sorts faster than the C64 
version; however it does not adjust formulas 
containing references to sorted rows; 
sophisticated users take note. 

An improvement in the copy and move 
routines now means that only the top left 
destination cell be designated. The program 
remembers the shape of the data being 
transferred and acts accordingly. In the 64 
version you have to specify start and end cells, 
a real hassle when working with large amounts 
of data. 

A DOUBLE DOSE OF MANUALS 

Vizastar 128 has a Tutorial Guide in addition 
to the more traditional Reference/Owner's 
Manual. While some of the information is 
duplicated, this 5i-page booklet provides a 
useful service for newcomers or casual users 
who may not be acquainted with spreadsheets 
and databases. The guide also covers hardcopy 
output and creation of simple "Exec" files 
(macros). 

The Owner's Manual digs into the nitty gritty 
details of running and using Vizastar 128. It is 
well organized and thorough in its contents. 
Information is presented in building block 
fashion; the foundation is laid before more 
advanced concepts are introduced. This 
approach lessens the intimidation factor which 
often overwhelms users trying to digest a 
program of this scope. 

Despite its excellent teaching methodology 



and complete reference section the manual does 
suffer from a lack of illustrations or screen 
shots. 

HELP OF A DIFFERENT COLOR 

Vizastar does not have on-line help; instead it 
has a series of tutorial files on disk. These are 
accessed (very cleverly) through the macro 
function. After loading the menu (a macro 
itself) you select options to review specific 
topics such as building macros (!), using the 
database, working the range functions (copy, 
move, etc.) or general definition of terms. 

While part of this on-line aid is self running, 
displaying useful insights and information, a 
large number of the topics are interactive in 
nature. You get to actually key in data and 
review the effects. This is vividly demonstrated 
in the graph option. You first select a standard 
two dimensional bar chart, then alter the data. 
Right in front of your eyes the chart adjusts to 
the new parameters. Hotlink capability for the 
128! 



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Another interactive portion of the on-line 
guide covers the database. It defines all terms 
in a succinct yet complete manner. The 
automated date setup tutorial is another gem. 
There are a few left wanting however, the 
macro creation section in particular. 

Since the tutorials can be loaded into a 
worksheet they sort of work like traditional 
help. Then again, they sort of don't, since you 
have to save data being worked on before 
accessing the tutorials, then recall it when 
you're done learning. The tutorial is a left- 
handed approach to on-line help. 



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AND IN THIS CORNER ... 

Vjzastar's first impression is one of 
antiseptic, laboratory-like efficiency. The blue 
and white ruled display is uncluttered and 
inviting. 

The spreadsheet is 1,000 rows by 64 columns 
in size, controls a 6QK workspace and allows 
up to 9 simultaneous windows. Though its 30 
built-in functions mean business they are 
pretty standard, without exceptional entries or 
uniqueness. 

The most advanced ones include horizontal 
and vertical table lookups, ISERR, ISN, IF 
FALSE, TODAY, DAY and DATE. ISERRR 
and ISNA are used to return true (1) or false 
(0) values under designated conditions. It's 



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range of logicals is adequate for business, 
educational and home use. Operators include 
OR, AND, NOT, =, < >, <, >, <= and >=. 

Revealing its English origins, Vizastar 128 
allows users to alter "tone". No, Vizastar is not 
talking bells, buzzers and beeps; it's talking 
colors. From within the TONE option you can 
independently cycle through 16 text or 
background colors. This is a welcome feature; 
long sessions in front of a CRT are often less 
trying when color (colour?) combinations arc 
changed from time to time. 

PIES, BASES AND EXECS 

Basic two-dimensional bar charts can be 
viewed directly on the worksheet. The pic and 
multibar (3-D) graphs display on a hi-res screen 
separate and independent from the worksheet. 
This enhanced video output is a real eye 
popper, particularly the multibar charts. 

Where the pic charts are colorful and 
informative, the 3-D images arc vivid, stand-up- 
and-takc-notice presentations. Since they both 



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use the same colors and are displayed at the 
same resolution, you may ask "What's the 
difference?" It's a matter of depth and shading. 
The pics are two dimensional (no flavors 
either) while the multibars have a contrasting 
shadow which serves to accent and strengthen 
the image. 

Both types show little or no color bleed. 
While build times (the time it takes for the 
chart to draw on-screen) are not instantaneous, 
they aren't excessive either. Both types are 
worth the wait. 

The database is rather full featured. Its 
generous limits allow up to 9 screens per 
record, 8,000 characters per record and up to 
16 separate files per disk. The number of 
records and databases is limited only by disk 
space. 



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Another version of the program's hotlink 
capability manifests itself here. Fields can be 
set to use worksheet cell contents, calculations 
can use worksheet formulas, and fields can 
even be included in the worksheet formulas! 

User-defined selective reporting is another 
measure of the database's flexibility and 
power. It's primary limitation appears to be 
restriction to a single key field. 

Executing a macro is easy. Developing one, 
while complicated, is not difficult. Macro 
creation is not a "learn-while-you-do" exercise. 
Instead of recording sequence keystrokes for 
replay, Vizastar has you enter keystrokes just 
like a formula. Function keys and other special 
entries must be preceded by CONTROL so the 
program recognizes them as macros. Once 
with the special entry conventions 
macros is just a matter of devoting 
and attention needed to get the job 



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THE COMMAND POST 



WHERE DOES IT STAND? 



Menu commands control cell characteristics 
(format, rccalc, protect, width and color), sheet 
factors (copy, move, insert, delete, windows, 
global formatting, sort order, erase and freeze 
headings), and file commands (load, save, 
merge, format disks, scratch files, and send 
DOS commands). The ability to send DOS 
commands lets you set device numbers, validate 
disks or issue any other DOS commands. 

Through the Print option you designate 
output ranges, send specific printer codes for 
boldface, underlining, etc. or completely 
manipulate page format. Type of printer 
(RS232, Commodore or parallel), type of paper 
(fanfold or single sheet), paper length, text 
length and margin settings arc altered from a 
single table. (A separate but related feature is 
the ability to dump a screen via ALT-1, 2, or 3 
command Sequences). 

Database commands are used to name 
databases and files, specify ranges and 
establish search/sort criteria. You can also lay 
out file designs, draw boxes, highlight fields or 
alter anything anytime. And you can import or 
export CBM ASCII sequential files with this 
option. 

Every option mentioned so far is totally 
RAM resident. One, Graphs, accesses the 
program disk for certain hardcopy information. 
Otherwise it, too, is I/O free. 

A FEW FOIBLES 

Of course there are some omissions. For 
instance, the program never indicates 
calculation status on the worksheet. Is it 
manual or auto?; some people like to know. 

If there is a way to blank or clear an entire 
worksheet with a single command it is well 
hidden. Having to designate the entire 
worksheet as a range is ridiculous. 

Hardcopy output of graphs needs a graphics- 
capable dot matrix. No problem there. Screen 
dumps also need one, though that fact is not 
clearly presented. Doing screen dumps to a 
1526 or equivalent isn't recommended. 

The spreadsheet features all the basics you'd 
expect. The only unusual aspect is the need to 
enter internal functions in lowercase only. 
Even though the manual shows @SUM and 
similar operators in uppercase, the program 
only recognizes them in lowercase. Though 
clearly noted in the manual, this situation is 
still a source of potential confusion. 



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Anywhere it wants to. Despite minor quirks 
this is a powerhouse program with few of the 
compromises normally associated with 
integrated programs. If Solid State could 
somehow integrate Vizastar 128 and Vizawrite 
Classic into a single program it would become 
the Commodore 128 Appleworks. 



MAXIPLAN 1.0 

Intuitive Technoligies/Amiga/***/SlSO 

MaxiPlan is Intuitive Technology's entry into 
the burgeoning Amiga spreadsheet war. While 
it's primary application is number crunching, 
MaxiPlan goes further with a built-in database 
and sophisticated graphing capabilities. 

IT'S AMIGA-TIZED! 

MaxiPlan has done a lot to incorporate the 
special capabilities of the Amiga into it's 
operation. 

Thanks to its OPEN/CLOSE WORKBENCH 
options in the Project menu, MaxiPlan makes 
multitasking as easy as clicking the mouse. 
(This convenience should not be confused with 
the program's ability to open multiple 
spreadsheets simultaneously.) 



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MaxiPlan accesses the machine's internal 
speech capabilities via MaxiSet, a peripheral 
program which allows you to select 
male/female inflection, pitch, rate, and 
frequency. MaxiSet must be adjusted prior to 
opening the worksheet. Actual speech output is 
toggled on/off and otherwise adjusted via 




Down To Busiitess 



con t inued 



? 



menu selections from within the main routine. 

MaxiPlan allows you to manipulate fonts, 
typeface characteristics (boldface, underline, 
etc.) and up to eight user definable colors. 
Though it's enhanced color mode (8 hues 
instead of 4) takes a hefty chunk of RAM, the 
benefits far outweigh the drawbacks. 

Besides supporting the mouse, MaxiPlan 
makes good use of the function keys. The 
Amiga keys are also used since many menu 
options _ have keyboard equivalents. Such 
flexibility allows users to work the way they 
want to, not just as the programmer thinks 
best. 

MaxiPlan provides online help without the 
HELP key; instead, ? brings up help. This is a 
strange omission considering how well 
MaxiPlan capitalizes on the Amiga's other 
special keys. (Help is also available via menu 
options). 

FUNCTIONS & FEATURES 

MaxiPlan's worksheet ranges up to 512 
columns by 16,384 rows. Internal memory 
management techniques conserve memory by 
using RAM only for active (filled) cells. 

The multilevel help feature provides detailed 
information on commands as well as overviews 
of the main options. This supplements the 
material found in the manual's tutorial and 
reference sections. It in turn is supplemented 
by the specific notepad comments in the 
ANSWERS drawer and the sample worksheet 
templates also included on the disk. (See 
sidebar). 

Besides a program for importing Lotus WKS 
files (but not macros) the program disk 
contains MaxiMcrge for printing labels and 
mailmcrging. However, you still need a word 
processor to make full use of this optional 
routine. 

The user manual accomodates spreadsheet 
novices while dispensing enough information 
(in a logical order) to prevent advanced users 
from getting bored. It falls down somewhat 
because of it's too-brief tutorial and the short, 
almost totally useless index. But the manual is 
clearly written (except for the database 
section), with informative screen shots and a 
good reference section. 

The clipboard's cut, copy and paste options 
work well and with little effort . Information 
can be repositioned within or between 
worksheets. 



Other basic capabilities include the use of 
named ranges, protected cells, absolute/relative 
formula migration, multiple formats (decimal, 
dollars, percent, etc.) and over 5 dozen built-in 
functions. Every basic function is present and 
accounted for. (See sidebar for more 
information about MaxiPlan's functions.) 

Especially in large spreadsheets, case of 
cursor movement is of extreme importance. 
MaxiPlan's programmers evidently realize this, 
for the program is blessed with an abundance 
of cursor-movement options: the mouse, 
dedicated arrow keys, vertical and horizontal 
scroll bars, function keys (for SELECT and 
HOME), and Wordstar-like command keys can 
all be used to move around. Why anyone 
would want to put Wordstar's multiple-keypress 
cursor movement commands in an advanced 
program with mouse control and dedicated 
cursor keys is difficult to fathom, but at least 
it's only an option. Cursor movement in 
MaxiPlan is superior. 



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CONSTRUCTION SET 

Intuitive Technologies took the "Bill Budge" 
approach to spreadsheets: a construction set! 
The upper portion of the screen has icons for 
formula creation. Click on a mathematical 
operator and it becomes part of a formula. 
Likewise with the number icons, parentheses, 
cancel, and function call icons. It's possible to 
write an entire formula, including cell 
references, without ever pressing a key. 
Fantastic! Naturally things can be done the old 
fashioned, un-Amiga way if you prefer. 




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Down To Business 



continued 



? 



DATABASE BLUES 

The four-pronged instruction approach the 
MaxiPlan documentation takes works well in 
every case but one: the database. Nowhere are 
the instructions complete. The database 
requires an inordinate amount of time to learn 
and far too much trial and error to make it 
function. 

That is not to say the database doesn't work. 
It does, and very well indeed. By properly 
combining levels of criteria any quantity of 
data can be manipulated, extracted or deleted. 
It just doesn't have to be this confusing or 
hard to use. 

CHARTING YOUR COURSE 

MaxiPlan unveils it's true colors when 
plotting graphs. It's enhanced color mode 
produces visually spectacular bar, line, pic and 
area charts. Up to eight chart definitions can 
be tied to a single worksheet. They can be of 
one type, or mix-and-match. 

A "hot link" feature interactively tics 
worksheets to graphs. To sec this in action 
draw a graph, change values in the sheet, and 
watch as the graph adjusts to the new values. 
Spectacular. 

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Adequate (barely) room is provided for chart 
titles and X and Y axis labels. Up to four rows 
can be plotted in a single chart; a range of 
columns can be likewise selected via requester 
boxes. 

While the 4 most common chart types are 
available, stacked bar, exploding pie, scatter 
and others are needed. Expanded labelling and 
titling capabilities would be nice, too. 



NOT ALL WINE &. ROSES 

There are a few problems and omissions. 
First of all, the macro menu is not operational. 

ABOUT MACROS, one of the options, tells 
you that a macro routine is now available for 
another $50.00. MaxiPlan lets you paste notes 
to any cell, just like the hot selling third party 
add-on for Lotus. If IT can provide this as a 
standard feature they could certainly build a 
worksheet with working macros. 

Once while using the PASTE NAME option 
the entire left side of the spreadsheet's edit 
section blanked out. The menus still pulled 
down though none of the options worked. This 
fluke occurred after flipping between windows. 
In retracing the steps a Memory Low dialog 
box was uncovered. Cancelling the option 
restored the program to full operational 
capacity. While MaxiPlan did not crash in this 
case, it failed to properly display the error 
message about low memory. 

Speaking of low memory, these messages 
started appearing when 50K of RAM was left. 
This seems a bit early to call out the troops if 
you ask me. 

Even if selected, the TALK option won't 
work under low memory conditions. The 
program doesn't warn you about this, it just 
cancels speech output if the required RAM 
isn't available. 

One complete crash did occur, once when the 
workbench was opened via the menu option. 
After issuing commands (AMIGA-N) and 
(AMIGA-M), pulling the MaxiPlan window 
down and selecting DISCARD from the 
workbench menu the program locked up and 
the Guru meditated. 

THE ENVELOPE PLEASE 

MaxiPlan does a near perfect job when it 
comes to using the qualities which make the 
Amiga unique. The spreadsheet responds 
quickly, the graphs have impact and advanced 
functions are included along with all the 
basics. The construction set capability is a real 
boon, simultaneously promoting and making 
further use of the mouse. 

The database feature is an admirable attempt 
to expand Maxiplan into an integrated package. 
It will be more successful in this area once the 



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Down Id Business 



continued 



,1 



documentation explains the database better, 
MaxiPlan's database lies somewhere above a 
simple filing program but below a true 
relational database management system in 
power and functionality. 

The Amiga spreadsheet war is definitely 
heating up; there are 3 major contenders for 
the throne and MaxiPIan is one of them. If 
you're in the market check this one out. 



HELP: Any Way You Want It 

MaxiPIan offers four kinds of help: 

Manual: Brief tutorial, first class reference 
section with short, descriptive explanations of 
the program's internal functions. 

Online: Two-tiered approach, provides a lot of 
default information such as cell width, date 
formats, etc. 

Templates; "Physical" evidence on how to use 
MaxiPIan. Displays fonts, boldface (etc.), 
colors, the results of each built-in function 
(Excellent!), and the recalcitrant database. A 
keyboard template which outlines function key 
use also comes in very handy. 

Answers drawer: Main topics of interest 
covered here include limited use of the scroll 
bars under Kickstart 1.1, the database, and 
errata.* 

*Due to difficulties in Kickstart 1.1 the bars 
only scroll up to row 2,048. Version 1.2 will 
supposedly correct this limitation. Minor 
changes in importing Lotus 1-2-3 (and Amiga 
VIP Professional) files are explained under the 
errata heading; steps to set up and use the 
database are listed under the database heading. 



ADVANCED FUNCTIONS 

MaxiPlan's interna! functions arc grouped into 
four classes, Numeric, Logical, Auxiliary, and 
database. Here are some of the more powerful 
and unique functions: 

COLOR - allows color output of calculation 
results . Debts can automatically be displayed 
in red for example. 

DATABASE STANDARD DEVIATION, 
VARIANCE & AVERAGE - allow separate 
manipulation of database criteria. 

SAY - allows verbal output of calculation 
results. Great for the vision-impaired or times 
when you're too busy to pay complete attention 
to all the processing involved in a large 
worksheet. (Speech can be programmed for 
when certain conditions are met, alerting you 
to a special condition in the process). 

NA (NOT AVAILABLE) - special cell 
condition, 

ISERR (IS ERROR) - conditional reading 
for errors in cells. 

ISNA (IS NOT AVAILABLE) - conditional 
reading for NA statement in cells. 

STYLE - allows special typeface 
characteristics to be output based on conditions 
encountered. 




'If I didn't know better, I'd say 
it was a head gasket." 



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COMMODORE 128 OWNERS 

THE REVISEDCLONE ENDSTHE 

SOFTWARE BACK-UP BLUES! 



s\^j 



V3.0 



ULTRABYTE 

DISK 

NIBBLER 



The complete update to the 
1571 Clone Is now being 
shipped. Our new manual Is 
almost 50 pages long and 
explains all aspects. We 
improved the OCR & Nibble 
copiers and added a MFM 
Copy [back up IBM disks 
on Commodore?). The 
expansion section has over 
50 (lies. Included Is a block 
editor, auto boot maker, 
single or 2 side copy, copy 
to alt. sides, track analysis 
{sync marks, density, block 
size, OCR data. Hex data), 
bulk erase, format, copy & 
combine files, plus more. 
Over 25 selections from 
menus. Use with a 1 or 2 
1571 drive system. 

STILL ONLY $49.95 

WETL STItL GIVE YOU SIO TRADE 
IFOR YOUR OaSOtETE COPY DISK 




Available from 



DISTRIBUTING. INC 
1342B Route 23 
Butler, N.J. 07405 
CALL; (201) 838-9027 



$10 UPGRADE lor all 
registered 1571 CLONE 

MACHINE Owners 

VISA . MASTERCARD 
DEALER & DIST INQUIRES 



Lincoln College 
Commodore Computer Camp 

with 

JIM BUTTERFIELD 

and other experts 

July 19-25, 1987 

Topics include: 

• Amiga 

• C-128 

• Robotics 

• Telecomputing 

• Additional selected topics 

For further informatfon, contact: 

Office of Continuing Education 
Lincoln College 
300 Keokuk 
Lincoln, IL 62656 
217/732-3155 



NEW SIXTH GENERATION ULTRABYTE COPIER 
FOR COMMODORE 64 and 12B {in 64 mode) 

• Copies 99+% of protected software in 2 min. or less 
includes parameters for 160 recent, hard-lo-copy 
disks. ( Send stamped envelope for list ). 
Includes fast tile copy program 

• Uses 1 or 2 1541 /1571 drives, or MSD dual drive 

• More powerful than KeyMaster, Diskbuster, Copy II, 
Superkit, 21 Second, Clone or Cracker 

• Copies itself ( for this reason, no refunds given ) 



SPECIAL - BUY A NIBBLER 1/3.0 AND GET 

YOUR CHOICE OF A FREE SH.95 PROGRAM 

$39.95 plus S4.00 shipping 



Disk Surgeon — disk utility 514.95 

Ullramail -- mail list and label printer S14.95 

McMurptiys Mansion -- text adventure S14.95 

Handy-Capper - race tiandicap system ...S14.9S 

( Atjove may be ordered separately for S14.95 plus S4.00 
shiipping. Foreign orders add S2.00 ) 
Mastercard. Visa. Ctieck or M.O., Calif, add 6.5% ( S 2.60 ) sales lax. 
Foreign orders/ COD add $2.00. Payment must be in U.S. funds 
UPDATES-Return your original Ultrabyte disk witfi SIO.OO plus 
54.00 shipping. Foreign add $2.00 

To order, write or call 24 hr. order line. For into, wrile. 

ULTRABYTE (818) 796-0576 
P.O. Box 789 LaCanada, CA 91011 USA 



DEALERS & DISTRIBUTORS WANTED 



^niiiiiiDiGiTnL \7Dioniiiiiiii| 
I COMPUTEREYES" 

VIDEO IMAGES ON YOUR COMPUTER! 

ffnM\y—gn rncKpcnsive way lo capture tsai-yvor\d im^gp5 on your co-npuief '5 
graphjci displayl COMPUTeREYES " rs an inncrjsfiw slow scan device ihm con- 
neas between any standard video source [video tape recorder, video camera, 
videcdisk, etc ] and you( computer Under simplf software controJ, a b/w jmagc 
■^ acquired in less ih,in mj; seconds Unique multi-scan tnodes alw provide 
le^listic grey-icale images Hundreds of applicatiansf 



Package includes interface mriodule, com- 
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lUSAl 

Alio aviiifafiie as a compleie package 
inclu3ing 

• COMPUTEReYES'' 

■ Quality D/w v^deo camera 

■ Conneaingcabfe 



Demo disk avadabfe for Sl0.00postp5id 
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DKfham. MA 02026 
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Available for: 

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• Commodore 64/129 

• Atari e00/8OOXL/U0X£ 
■ ISM f*C ai>d coTTTpatibles 

[5249 95— includes 
additional features} 

• Als:iSTfS249 95luN 
color digitpzerf 



73 




for the 

COMMODORE ias 

An 
INTRODUCTION TO CP/M 



This CP'W ki! consisis o1 INree disk:^ Of public damafn programs and a 
boohlei Ihat will encoorage ihe Commodore 128 owner Id use the 
CP/M moda. 

The bodklei is wriiren wlih the begrnner In mind, Bsiumlrig no previoya 
knowlet^e ot CP/M Each qI the pfog'arr? is fully documented end 
testea lo run on the Commodore 128 with either the 1S41 or 1571 
di$h onve. 

Wrih the programs Included in this kit the user can: 



• Manipulate libranps 

• Do wotd pfocessing 

• Piay chess 

■ Cstpl;>g CP/M disk coileciions 

• Utilme a modem In CP/M mode 



INNOVATIVE COMPUTER 

ACCESSORIES 

la-ig Downing Street 

PO Box 769 

Imperial BeacTi, Colit. 92032-0837 



• Edit tiiss 

• Manage and mainlai'n dis^ fties 

• View Of piini 134 pages o( 
adO'liDnai documentation 

• And much, much more 



1M1 c- 1571 &ik I>^v« 
Haniic o' TV 
Pr.o(f! (0£Mi5iu-i| 
Modem [Optioni'] 



Suf. Retail ti!».9S 



■C*l« »"d C'W Plus V»fo« 1 in <*0ti«'HT I'mOw^f^i o( D^ui n4«i*>ch. t 
Cop»n9"ir ' 1M6 trf !"«(»»(-»» Cc«cjt«' Ve^iw""" INCA 



COMPUTER SWAP INC. 
-- Presents — 

THE 

COMMODORE 
SHOW 



1987 



SAN FRANCISCO * FEBRUARY 

February 20,21, & 22 
BROOKS HALL * ^AN FRANCISCO 
SHOW TIMES: 10 - 6 FRI. & SAT. 

12 - 5 SUNDAY 
(formerly a WCCA production) 

' EXHIBITS, EVENTS, AND DOOR PRIZES 
' NATIONAL COMMODORE SPEAKERS 
' SHOW SPECIALS & DISCOUNTS 
' SEE THE LATEST INNOVATIONS IN 

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FOR THE COMMODORE MARKET 

The only Wesl Coasl exhibition and conference 
focusing exclusivelv on the AMIGA. 
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Registration fees: one day $10.00 three days $15.00 

For more information and details contact' 
COMPUTER SWAP. INC 

P.O. BOX 18906 
SAN JOSE. CA 95158 

In San Jose: (408)978-7927 
1-800-722-7927 (In California 



1-800-252-7927) 



PRACTICE INTERVIEWING PATIEHTS OH A 64 



Students of PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIAL WOR<, 
COUNSELIHG.PSYCHIATRIC KUHSINGj or Other 
HELPING PRfiFESSIONS.CLIfJICAL II^TERVIEWS 
allows you to. practice initialinterviews 
prior to meeting real patients. 

* Five different patients on one disk 

* Host interviews take 1-3 hours 

* Patients represent the types ijf 
problems yoU might encounter in 
mental health settings 

* Interviews can be repeated to 
improve your style 

* Hardcopy option so you cgn print 
out and stUdy yoyr tecbnique 

* Surarnary qt your interview available 
at any. time so you can see how you 
are doing 

* Help screens to give you clues 

* Developed by a psychology professor 

THE^FOLLOWING IS AH ACTUAL SAMPLE OF THE 
FIRST MINUTES OF AH INTERVIEW WITH ONE OF 
THE PATIENTS: 

TRAGI E: 



STUDENT: 
TRACIE: 
STUDENT: 
TRACIE: 

WARING: 



My, name is Tracie, 1 was 

told I had to talk to yay 

before 1 could see a shrink. 

Wiat do you want to know 

a 30ut me? 

Wiat things do you think I 

should know? 

I'm awful anxious. ] guess 

I 'm also pretty unhappy. 

How long have you felt this 

way? 

I guess I've been anxious for 

a long titne. 

Flstients use pcofanitv, & 
discuss sexuality in EXPLICIT 
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Send S30, 00, plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling (check., or. maney_grders onry) to: 



CLINJCAL IHTERVIEWS 



BOf. 



Wlllard, HY 14588 
New York residents add $2.10 i 



sales tax) 




CONTACT: CAROL BROWN 
for complete information. 
(319) 338-3620 
[advertisers ONLY) 



•based on 12X rate while 
ratecard «6 is in effect. 



256K & 64K RAM 

EXPANSION CARTRIDGES 
For the Commodore 64 



256K. 
6^K.. 



. S94.'"' 
. $64.'"' 



• EM256K has thiftytwoSK byte blocks 

• EM64K has eight 8K byte blocks 

• Expansion port cortridges install easilv 

• Compatible with most soff/hQfdwofe 

• RAMDISK copobilities for lightspeed I/O 

• Stores data, files, bosic ond f^lL progroms 

• Progra ms con run within the EM266K/6dK 

• Diskette of utility programs incfuded 

• Programmer's reference guide provided 

• Free newsletters to keep you up to date 

• 30 doy money back guarantee 

• OEM pricing available tosoft\A/ore houses 

ICe chips 

INTEGRATED CIRCUIT HEAT SINKS 

FOR COMPUTERS & PERIPHERALS 

C64 ICe chips S12.^ 

VIC 1541 ICe chips $11.|» 

C64 and VIC 1541 ICe chips . . . $18.™ 

• Thermallyconductlveadhesiveincluded 

• Dramatically reduces IC temperature 

• Increase device reliobility and lifetime 

• tulostdirectonciettectivevw^ytocoollC's 

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Coll or write for ICe chips ovailability for 

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Quantify discounts available. 

Prices incluOe sripppjr\g W residents odct 7% to* 
PER FORMANC E 
PER I P H E R A L S --.c 

5 Upper Loudon Rd,, Loudonwile. NY 1221 1 
(518)436-0485 



74 



tensoft 
presents 




METICIAN 



An Exciting Arithmetic Game For 

The Commodore d^'^ and Commodore 128" 



• 524 95 New low prices. 

• Be 3 top Arithmerician. 

• Grades I lo 6 to aduli. 

• Kid lesied— Easy to use. 

■ Agreatvslup — cove/s all skill levels 
from 1 riigil addition to 7 digit long 
division — use lot years 

■ Improveyouf math grades wfiile 
having fun, 

• CfialJcngcs tnai adjust to the level 
of play. Non-linear scoring. 

Otdtl Dy prwxw TOa FREE WfflU Vi« or M«[efC3rd 1fl00-8ra-l8?*. In CaWomw c<ifl I-eOO-W6-6126 

Li Please send Tiw A/iuifrteDcian disks si J24 95 eacn 

(CalitofniB resicreri/s aad 6% safes rax J 
n Swm mof# trriofmaWon only D Check or money Of dcr enclosed D WM □ AflajtprCard 



• Arithmetician is a game of 
aritnmeiic practice that is filled with 
action, delightful music and 
wfiimsical animated caitoons. 

■ Large clear numtiers and a simple 
cntiy system make working hard 
problems on the screen almost as 
easy as on paper. 

• Tfie most enjoyable way to 
practice arithmetic ever devised. 















City/SWTc — , 


. Zip 



Send to t«nHrft^P.O.ata 06971, Swiblago, CA42T3S 



Ccrrftioa&c 64 fs a rtfjutcfccf n wenurt of Commooofe EIk nofKi. uo ' 



i4& 'Pn.Mcn. S^t^^^^^t'CC/t 




The Xeiec Prmier Enhancer jmpfoves the usefulness ot your printer wilh the inteFhal 
high- perform ft nte Dutlflf, seteciable foni styles, and hardware and software suppol tor 
!WQ independent printers 

arn sBlOCiaQJ* Bv iCfTvkare Oi ffoni panet conTfof 

The IP5 a'lOAS the cperalisn ol on* a' two pnnlBis witn indepeidaml selefiliDi of fortti .S'^d O'rril*' TyWS 
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daiA Irans^r wti.lr ihoiding an Average o' 30 pagea of teo 

FULL CONTROL PANEL: The Irow pinH conHOH mclud* CPJI». Copy Pit,tif. SfllKl and f onr plui 
LEO irtii[:alQ'i <ot cfnl^rf and tStiT tClWVOfiS CLEAR cl«a(s ir>e Ov»^ OJiW COPV ■ pnnls copws oT 
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FRONT PANEL PRQCnAMMING: Alihdugh unlrol codes rnay be em]»d<:M m Iml lOr maTiipuiatiOiri of 
ih.« iQFi'.s an alTerna!:i.e ss p^Dkidec iihal allows use of lf« conlrol part*! \a 3*ecl the various tsarures 
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INTERNAL DIAGNOSTICS: The n'ernat diagnosliCT. mClua* * ImI lor lh« [wMer RAM Ifoni Mriel Swii- 
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CCFITIFICATION: Certiljnd To comply with tha limin Tor a ClaM B compuling d«>vjce plj'i 
i fit Part IS Ql FCC rui6i 



II 10 Sulipiil 



^w&^W TEC. Inc. i 2304 ArnoW Hfl. / Salin.a. Kansas 67<0t i 9i;3i-627-063& 



lli0ton iBuUctin iBoarii &cjatm llU.n 



Announcing the Most Sophisticated 

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718-383-8909 
714-989-1379 



VISION VERSION V1 1 .0 - $59.95 plus shipping and handling 
VISION MODULE BISK Vol, 1 - $29.95 plus shipping and handling 






NOW AVAILABLE 
NEW CP/M VERSION 



THE BIG BLUE REAPER; 

— Loads in 30 seconds. 

— Is easy lo use. 

— Features Standard ASCII 10 Com- 
modore or PET ASCII translation, 
and vice versa. 

— With ASCII IranslaSion. transfers 
MS-DOS tries to Comrnodore lor- 
mal at 12,000 bytes per minule. 
and Iransiers Commodore files to 
MS-DOS formal at 20.000 byies 
per minute. 

— Includes MS-DOS backup and 
MS-DOS disk-formatting pro- 
grams. 

— Displays on 80- Of dOKiolumn 
screen, in color or monocfirome. 

— Can be used with one or iwo disk 
dnves 

— Features printer output. 

— Error-checking incfudes: 

• correct disk 

* tuH disk 
» proper file name 

— CP/M version available as 
upgrade to current users. 

Tlie Big Blue Reader CP/M is 34^1.95 (includes all standard Big Blue Reader 
features) Standard Bfg Blue Reader is S3l 95 All prices U.S. currency and 
include shipping and handling. No credit card orders, please, Catilomia 
residents add $2.90 for The Big Olue Reader CP/M or 32.05 for standard Big 
Blue Reader, state sales tax CPM version available as upgrade to current 
users for $li5 plus yojr Big Blue Reader disk. Send cfieck or money order 
and all inquiries to: 

SOG.W.A P. Software. Inc. 

611 Boccaccio Avenue, Venice, CA 90291 

Telephone: (213) 822-113B 






WANT TO READ 

FROM AND WRITE 

TO IBM-COMPATIBLE 

FILES? 

If you have a Commodore 128^"^ and 
1571'"^ drsk drive, you can read from 
and wnle Id MS-DOS Wes using THE 
BIG BUUE HEADERl New Irom 
SO.G.W.AP Soltware. Inc., Ihe pro- 
Qfam allows users to transler files 
generated on most l8M-compatible 
software to Comn^odore DOS files. 
and vice versa Now THE BIG BLXIE 
REA[}ER CP/M gives you all Itie 
standard featu res of TH E BIG BLUE 
READER plus CP/M read and write 
capability! 




I/O Boards 

for Commodore, 
IBM, and others. 

16-8 Bit AnaliDg Inputs 

- 5 VDC 

1 4+ Discrete Switches 
300MA,30VDC 

1 Ariaiog Output 

Commodore $225 
IBM $265 
RS232 $365 



12 Bit Boards Available 
Special Software Available 

Now Available! 
MICRO - ED for the AMIGA 

Micro R&D Inc. 

3333 8. Wadsworth, Suite A - 1 04 

Lakewood, CO 80227 

(303) 985-4077 



FAST 
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OPERATION 




10 MBYTE DRIVE 
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• SUPPORTS SINGLE SIDED 
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(C'12B) DOS COIMMANDS 

• REPROGRAMMABLE 'BOS PAK-" 
(BUFFEREI> OPERATING SYSTEM) 

The DATA CHIEF has been designed by C-64 users fofC-64 users 
w.in imponant ieftluraB l'i*« 

SlO'aoa iri O'l^inAl tnOivi{}uBl disk lormal 

— Easy Access lo programs via Disk Number 

— EKfimplB fD/ disk ■ 60 OPEN 15 8, 15 H60' 
Standard Utilities Included 

— Includes Wadge Commands 
135 Walt Power Supply 
Metal Enclosure tiouses up to 3 each 1/2 Ht hard Disks 

— Proviiles Excellent Monitor Slaiid 'P C style 

— Allows roQiTv tor luture ekpanaion 
Complete Operaimg Manual 
1 Year Full Wflfranly 

ine DATA CHIEF is perfect lor software and nardwaie developers 
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well as lor bulletin boards and data base systerT\s 
TO ORDER SEND CERTIFIED CHECK OB MOtJEV ORDER TO 

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— ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ For mole information call 

{301)371-4000 

Allow 4-6 wQeks dflliviQiy (!J S Only) 

' C-64 & C-128 BTB Irademtirk^ Ol 

Commodore Eiectroncs. Ltd 

"■ GEOS PS a trademark of 
Barkelay SolTworks 



hMr \^t^M.'^ 



103 BAUGHMAN S LANE 
SUITE 301 
FREDERICK, MD 21701 



YOU 

Send us your old printer interface (no 

questions asked) along witii $59.00 

AND 



WE 



Will reward you with our deluxe 

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send to: 

MICRO R&D, INC. 
3333 S. Wadsworth #A 
Lakewood, CO 80227 



104 



76 




LOTTERY 64 
LOTTERY +4 



IING WITH YOUR SYSTEM'' 
TRY OURS' 

WE VE ALREADY WON THOUSANDS 
WITH IT AND WE RE STILL WINNING' 
LOTTERY has been designed to use tne 
compullng power of the COMMODORE 
computer to help you play ttie various lattery 
games: PICK 3. PICK A. LOTTO. SUPER 
LOTTO, 6/49. LUCKY LOTTERY, etc. It can 
lie used witli any lottery game in whicti you 
pick the numbers- 

AUAILABLE ON DISKETTE ONLY. 
SPECIFY 54'128 or PLUS/4 

To order, send S24.95 tor each plus 

S3. 00 postage and handling per order to: 

llilinois residents add 6% sales taxi 



C.O.D. orders call: (312)566-4617 



Superior Micro Systems, inc. 

PO Boj713- Wheeling IL B0090 
Dealer inQuines welcome ' 







"I Saved Time and Money with Physical Exam. 

I use a data base program to 
keep records for our club. I 
work a couple of nights each 
week updating records. Laiit 
week I experienced read errors 
several times. Luckily I had 
purchased a copy of 1541 Phy- 
sical Exam last month and had 
saved a printed copy of the 
alignment test results. Running 
a new alignment test confirmed 
what I had suspectedj my drive 
had drifted out of alignment. I 
am happy to report that 1 
aligned my drive MYSELF. I 
saved time, (as my drive didn't 
have to sit in our local dealer's 
service dept. awaiting repair) 
and money — the Physical 
Exam program costs a fraction 
of what repair centers charge. 
And I can use it numerous 
times! 

Physical Exam is available for these drives: 1541, 1571, 8050, 8250, 
4040, and SFD 1001. Please Specify Drive! •$39.95 ea.^ .ship. 

Hours: MON-SAT 10-6 



Package includEs: 

• True digital alignment disk with offset 
tracks. 

• Speed test 

• Mechanical stop lest 

• Instruction.s for performing alignment, 
adjusting speed and slop position. 

• Hard copy mode to print test results 
for future comparison & reference. 



^K* C8 



i 800-762-5645 



Cardinal Software 14840 Build America Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Info; 491-6494 




McGuffy's Grader 

IS HEREI 



GUARANTEED TO DO EVERYTHING YOU HAVE EVER 
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OF ALL GRADES BY ASSIGNMENT * WEIGHTING * 
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COMMENTS * STATISTICS * SEMESTER AVERAGING 
AND HNAL GRADE * ROSTER DUPLICATION * ACCEPTS 
POINTS, PERCENTS LETTER GRADES OR YOUR OWN 
SYMBOLS * MANY. MANY MORE FEATURES. 

- SUITABLE FOR ALL LEVELS OF EDUCATION- 
AN EPIC PROGRAM FOR AN EPIC TASK 



FOR APPLE IIE, lie (80 COLUMNS), COMMODORE 64, 
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FREE TRIAL IN YOUR SCHOOL FOR 30 DAYS 
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CALL TODAY, 1-800-422-0095 

MICHIGAN AND ORDERS AFTER 5:00 P.M.. (313) 477-0897 
VISA/MASTERCARD 

MIDWEST SOFTWARE. BOX 214, FARMINGTON, Mi 4K024 



COHWION STOCK ANALVSIS 

WITH YOUR COMPUTER 

WALLSTREET MICROSCOPE 



Available for; CommodOfe-64; 
Apple lit, II E, II C; IBM and Compalables 

• Stocks Judged by 10 Criteria 

• 5 By Price (Cap Gains Potential) 

• 5 By Financial SlabiKly (Safety) 

• Criteria Values May Be Set By User 

Eight Compuler Programs 

Though Documentation 

Comes Complete With 

1500 Company Data Base 

$135.°" 

lUpdales Available By Subscriplion) 

• Search Capabalilties • Market Averages 

• Single or Batch • Graphics 
Processing 

DEMONSTRATION DISK-$10 

($13-0.0.0.) 

Order Demo Direct or From Your Dealer. 

(Dealer Inquiries Invited) 

"At a Powerlul Financial Planning Tool, 
Wallslteel Microscope /« Top— Notch . ■ . 
Wallttreat Microscope Gives You Your 
Money's Worlh And More— As a Reliable, 
Computerized Stock Manager and 
Forecaster. " 

(The Book of Commodore 64 Sollware IMS) 

WALLSTREET CORP. 

C»ll; (402) 390-3372 (24 Hrs.) for C.O.D. 

Write: 15Z7 S. 93rd Ave. 
Omaha, HE 68124 



EUPHONIC MUSIC e 
CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM 



ECMS ]s a 100% machine language program for Commodore 64 and Com- 
modore 128 computers that allows long pieces of music to be written ond 
played in up to three voices. The most powerful music progrom availoble for a 
home computer, it is designed for anyone interested in music, beginners to 
serious musicians. Rated the Best Music Construction Program, hands down I 



The GAME MASTER 
6-PAK 



' plays long pieces of music — 50 min, or more 
' ^\usic may be accompDnlBd wifh words 
■ Full-color, hi-res d'sploy includes stclJ and 

keyboord 
' 5'i octave range on slofl ond keyboard. 

B-Dctove oudio 
' Up io 3 vciices played simulroneoutly 
' Voices may be pCayed in ony of 9 instruments 
' built-in synthesizer 

May be programmed 1o change whiJe music is 

played 

Any poiliori of music may be ployed 

Notes and keys chonge color as they ore 

played 

Soverol piocos of musk mtluding Beethoven^ 

BntJre Waldstein sonoto {23 minutes), and 

other pieces by Bach. Chopin. Joplin, Mozart, 

etc. 

Music files may be played automolically in 

any sequence 

Copyoble porlion oi program dIIows you to 

sand your compositions tn yaur friends ond 

incorporote them in your own programs 

£aSy Ccide (or writing music 

Music can be written in any key 

Key may be transposed to any other key 

16 durations ond rest; 



• 32nd5, dotied 16ihs. doited whole notes 

■ Time signoiuro, key signoiure and tempo can 
be continuously changed 

• Continuous volume conrrol allows crosEendo^. 
detreicendoi, sforiondos 

' Attock aulDmlilicnlly adjusted for softly 
played notes 

■ Legato and staccato modes selectable for 
each note 

" Ties 

• Irregular-length meo&ures and durations 
allowed 

■ Musk Eodo mny be written Jn form (.,.)n to 
simplify writing of repetitive sequences 

• Porfions of music of any length may be defin- 
ed with up to 32 uariobles. Variables may be 
used for repeats 

• Defined sequences can ge repeated in dif- 
ferent keys 

• VorJobles may be nested to a depth of 7 
levels 

■ Full-screen editing of music code 

• Eosy merging of files 

• Automatic error defection 

• No tedious waits for disk loads since aJI pro- 
gramming is in RAM simultaneously 



• Six of your favorite gomes 

on one disk ^^ 

• One low price 

• Top Quality ^:::::^ 
6-PAK 

PRICE ONLY *29" 






+ S3 shinping 



The ULTRAVOX Sound System 



Complete System only *39'^ S3sh,pp,ng 

WARNING: This pragrom is fun, complex, educotional and the best of its kind. 



• Hear your Commodore in 
100% STEREO 



• 100% Hardware / f ' ^^/ 

• No Soldering V\\V?^/ 

The only stereo converter for your computer 

Reg.: 69^5 Now: 39'^ ^$3shipp,ng 



ORDER NOW! 



Send check or 

M.O., VISA, M.C., 

or C.O.D. to: 



PRECISION PERIPHERALS and SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 20395 

Portland, OR 97220 or call (503) 254-7855 



U^ 




KRACKER JAX® 

REVEALED! 

THE BOOK ^— 



At last — Kracker Jax takes you 
beyond the protection barrier! The 
secrets of un-protecting software are 
yours with Krackir Jax revealed! 

We'll show you exactly how to defeat 
five different protection sctiemes 
encompassing scores of current 
programs. Our tutorial has twenty 
specific examples to lead you, step 
by step, to a new level of knowledge. 
Here's what you get: 

• Kracker Jax revMlsd. 

• A reset switch. 

• A utility disk, 

• 20 parameters on disk. 

ONLY $19.95 COMPLETE! 

Please add S3 50 shtpping 3. handling. 
C O.D, orders mjsl add $1,50 more. 
Wease allow two weeks (or delivery. 



KRACKER JAX 



JLAIT C 

msx 

naTECTIOH 



ARE YOU CAUGHT UP IN THE 
COPY PROTECTION ARMS RACE? 

DEFEND YOURSELF WITH KHACKER JAX® 
A REVOLUTION IN ARCHIVAL SOFTWARE! 



^^ 



You know the routine by now: you buy an 
expensive nibbfer and next month It's 
obsolele. How many times is your wallel 
going to be nibbled? 

KraokBr Jax is NOT a nibbler. It is a param- 
eter copy system. Most volumes contain 
well over 100 separate copy parameters. 
What IS a parameter? Just a custom pro- 
gram that allows your 1541 or 1571 disk 
drive to strip all. and we mean ALL. copy 
protection from your expensive software, 
leaving you with UNPROTECTED. TOTALLY 
BROKEN bacK-ups that can be copied with 
even a simple fast copier, 

This system has many advantages over the 
older nlbblBf typeol utilitios. For onethlng. 
you don't have to experiment. Each 
parameter WILL back-up the title it was cre- 
ated for. Period. 

For another, a back-up created with 
Kracker Jax will NEVER rattle your disk 
drive head. And that means less disk drive 
alignment problems for you. 



^ 



Check out some ol these 
exclusive features: 

• Knoker Jax es Itic BEST program ot ils 
kind! 

• Kncker J«x will back up titles that the 
nibtMers CANT! 

• Kracker Jax requues NO special 
Knowledge to operate! 

• xrtektr Ju strips prolectlon In a matter 
o( SECONDS! 

• Xrieksr Jax Is priced RIGHT— |usl 
S19.95 complele! 

• Iracktr Jax is UNPROTECTED— easy lo 
back up! 

• Kraekar Jax updates are available 
QUARTERLY! 

Remember, the minute a now program is 
released, the Kracker Jax team will be 
developing a new parameter for It. This 
means that future Xrackar Jix disks will 
always contain parameters for the hottest 
new titles on Ihe maiket! Xraekar jax Is 
the system thai cannot fall behind Ihe 
times! 

In the copy protection arms race, Kraekar 
Jax is the tjltimate delense! 



ALL NEW VOLUME FOUR 

ONLY $19.95 EACH! VOL 1-3 STILL AVAILABLE, 



^ 



GDMPlTEfl 



MART 



Program Submissions 
Wanted 

Good Commissions. 
Nationaf Marketing. 



CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS OR ViSArniASTERCARD. 
Mail your order to: Computer Mart, Dept. I 
2700 NE Andresen Road / Vancouver, WA 98661 
Phone orders welcome: 206-695-1005 
Same day shipping/C.O.D.s please add S3.00. 



HOW TO GET THE 
MOST OUT OF 

GEOS 




— for the new user who wants . 7' / fc- 
to know more about GEOS and - ' I .^ J>- 
how to make it work for him; ' / '' 

/' ' I 

— for the advanced user who /- T 

wants more flexibility than / —/_. 

GEOS atone ofTers; i i 

T I \ ' 

— for the programmer who I 7/ \. 

wants to write his own utilities \ / // \ 

— the book jou need when the Mi/''^ 
manual is not enough; 



HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF GEOS gives tou the information that you need to use this 
powerful program to your best advantage. A team of experienced users and programmers examined 
GEOS inside and out to give you: 

— shortcuts to make your work go faster and smoother; 

— undocumented features that you will want to take advantage of, or avoid; 

— translation utilities to import text and graphics from other popular programs; 

— convtrsion utilities to let you transmit GEOS files to your friends via modem; 

— the GEOS file stnicture. so programmers can write utilities for their own special needs; and 



Comprehensive Reference 
Book $14.9S 



Complete Programs & Utilities 
Disk $9.95 

I Add $2.50 shipping and handllnR 
/ lllinals n^idenls add 6% sales lux 
/ C.O.D. orders addiUonal $2.00 
Make pavable to Midnite Press 



^ ORDER LINE: 

(800) 222 - 4441 



Mibnitt l^reSS 



GKOS isatradmiarl; of Berkefch Softworks. Comnmctore 64 [sa trademarti of Commodeire ElKlronics. T.td. 



1212 Hagan, Champaign, II. 61820 
Dealer inquiries welcome 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! 



TELECOMPUTING 





OUR 


RETAIL 


PRICE 


8D 


ea 


50 


43 


50 


43 


40 


34 


75 


64 


10 


34 


50 


43 



Botislera Pro 128 IProgressiffi) 
Bobsterm Pro 64 tP^ogressive) 
Prolarm 128 {King Microwate) 
Prolerm 64 [King Microware) 
flhap&ody 128 (King Microware) 
Slilh Sense 128 (Pfism) 
SynlBchBBS Const Set (Kiral 



LANGUAGES 8. COMPILERS 

GnDm»SpeBin28(Kira) 60 51 

Kyan Pascal 128 (Kyan) 70 60 

Kyan Pascal 64 iKyan) 70 60 

Oldsid PASCAL 64 (Precision) 50 43 

VS12B COBOL (Visionary) 50 43 

UTILITIES 

Big Blue Rea<lBr(Sogwap| 32 28 

GnDniiKitG4/12a(Kira) 40 34 

Physical Eiam 1541 (Cardinal) AO 34 

priyslcal Exam 1571 (Cardinal) 40 34 

PoKOr 64 (Pro-line) 50 43 

PAL 64 (Pro-line) 50 43 

Rebel AlsemMer 128 INu-Age) 30 26 

Toolboi64(Pro Ine] 90 TT 

TSDS Super AssemWer (No-Sync) 50 43 

AMIGA 

Cainlirlil3BLISP(Uet3CDmbCD) 200 170 

Lattice C Compiler (Ivlelacombco) 150 128 

HCC PASCAL (Melacombco) 100 85 

TDotkl1(Metaca[nbca) 50 43 



SUPER SPECIALS 
for PRO-LINE PRODUCTS!! 

Pro-Line set Ihe inOLisiry standard tor woroprocessors These 
(lavo a built-in spelling checker (or (igtitnjng last spelling 
correction and supports true proportional priming. 
WordPro 1 28/S (relai 89 951 our price S4S 

WordPro 64/S (retail 69 95) our price S39 



C Power is the Pest avallatte C ^nguage tje^elapmert 
package Produces native 3502/6502 tenguage(!biectcc<:e 
C-Power128 (retail 89-95] our price S49 

C-Pow«r64 (retail 69,95) our price S39 



GT4 is a '■high-productivity" canrioge thai transforms your 
slow 1541 into a super-fast, luiiy lunclional SUPER DRIVE 
Includes BASIC 4 and extra disk commands. For your C64. 
(iT4Cirtrldge <rcieii?9 95) ourprlceS19 



■ SPECIAL OFFER- 



HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF GEOS (Midnite Press] 

Comprenensive how-to reference tjook rtiST4.95 

Disk 01 complete programs & utilities rtlS9.95 

BOTH liool< and disk lor ONLY S20 00 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Advanced Music System (Firetiird) 
Celebrity Cookbook (Merrill Ward) 
RO¥d1heOrold(Badarsotl) 
Maps Europe [Padarsolt) 
Maps USA fRartarsolt) 
Maps iNorid (Raoarsofll 
Screen Converter (ft & M] 



OUR 
DETAIL PRICE 



20 




20 




20 




20 




20 




30 





GRAPHICS & CAD 

OUR 

RETAIL PRICE 

Clip Art Plus (RJSott) 22 19 

CA0 3D(iHT) 50 43 

DeskPaKBerkley) 30 Z6 

Doodle (Omni] 40 34 

Floidraw (Inkwell) 100 85 

Fleiilont (Inkwell) 30 26 

Fleii-Aided Design (Kiraj 40 34 

Foot Pac (Berkley) 30 26 

Gel i Save-a-PIc (R S, M) 35 30 

Graph Galleria.Rorder (Inkwell) 25 22 

Graph Galleria-Cllp (Inkwell) 25 22 

Graph Gallerla-HDllday (Inkwell) 25 22 

Graphic Integrator (Inkwell) 30 26 

GEOSlBerkley) 60 51 

HIgh-ResGraphlcs (RJSott) 20 17 

Perspectives II (Kira] 60 51 

FINANCE & DATABASE 

Accounl3nl128(KF5| 150 12a 

BEST Accounts Payable (Best) 60 51 

BEST Accounts Receivable (Best) 60 51 

BEST General Ledger (Best) 70 60 

BEST Invenlory Manager (Best) 70 60 

BEST Project Planner (Best) 90 77 

D'Flle Utilities IMIctiaelsoH) 25 22 

D-FUa12e(Michaelsolt| 25 22 

Prolile 128 (Pro-Line) 70 60 

Prollle 84 (Pro-Line) 50 43 



24-hour order line: (2 1 5) 683-5433 

RISK FREE POLICY 

We want you 10 be s3lisfred< If tJie product does not petform as expected, you may return it to us. wittiin 15 days ot receipt, 
lor a lull relufid of your purchase pries. Product must be unmarked and in saleable condition. 

ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

COO, MasterCard. VISA, personal cticck or money orders accepted. All payments must be in USA dollars. All products will be 
shipped immediately. Add $2 00 lor shippinQ and handling. Add S2.00 for COD (USA only). Add S4 00 lor Canadian and $6 00 
for foreign orders Add S2 DO lor 2nd Day Air service. PA residents add 6% sales ta« to total order. Please specify the enact 
produt;t name as listed m this ad. 



en i WALL 

Solid Products • Solid Sypport 
P.O. Box 129. Kutztown, PA 19S3D 

For proiluct irlormation write, or tall: 215-B83-5433 
Mcnday-FriilaySa.m. -4p.fr. EST 



79 



ANIMATE YOUR 
IMAGINATION 

CYBER VIDEO 



CYBER VIDEO provides an integrated 
environment for creating animations using 
HI-RES COLOR GRAPHICS, SPRITES, TEXT, 
MUSIC, AND SOUND EFFECTS without any 
programming at all. 

With CYBER VIDEO you can make ANI- 
MATED STORIES, CARTOONS, MUSIC 
VIDEOS, GREETING CARDS, etc. and its 
royalty free run time module allows others to 
see and hear your creations. 

CYBER VIDEO can push your C64 or 128 to 
their limits but it's so easy to use you will 
enjoy every minute you spend with it. 

CYBER VIDEO consists of three modules 
with quick drop down menus and easy "point 
and click" selection using either a Koalapad, 
a mouse, or a joystick. 

The GRAPHICS and especially the MUSIC 
MODULE are complete products in 
themselves and can stand comparison with 
anything on the market. 

The ANIMATION MODULE really can't be 
compared with other products, because 
nothing else allows you to combine music, 
text, hi-res graphics, and sprites so easily 
and with so much flexibility. 

SOME USER COMMENTS 
ABOUT CYBER VIDEO 

*7 soa a demo of CYBER VIDEO at a user group 
meeting and 1 was awestruck. " 

"CYBER VIDEO has some of the capabilities of 
Music Studio. GameMaker. Moviemaker, and 
Music Shop all rolled into one great package. " 

"Smooth precise drawing with greater detail than 
Koala. Sprite design is fastest and smoothest I haue 
seer\.'' 

HOW TO GET 

YOUR COPY OF CIBER VIDEO 

You can purchase CYBER VIDEO from your 
local Commodore retailer. Or send $39.95 for 
a complete system including demo disk, 
master program disk, 96 page manual, and 
dongle. Check, money order, or C.O.D. 
(208-667-9290) 

TOUCHSTONE 
BOX 1378 • COEURD'ALENE, ID 83814 



Retailers contact American Software Dist. 
800-225-7941 or 217-643-2050 




The MicroFlyte JOYSTICK 

Increase your flying en- 
joyment with the Micro 
Flyte Joystick— the ONLY 
fully proportional con- 
tinuously variable joystick 
control for Flight Simula- 
tor II. 

Only $59.'* (+$4shipping) 

OUR USERS SAY IT ALL: 

"...it transforms an excellent program into a truly 
realistic flight simulation system." B.A.C.E. 

"FSII flies like the real thing with your joystick and 
software driver! Congratulations on bringing a 
superior product to the market." D.F. 

"Simply put the MicroFlyte Joystick helps you 'fine 
tune' your flying." ANTIC 

Driver Disk for F15 now available for $9.95. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY/STATE/ZIP 

CARD NO. & EXP. DATE 



FSII Is a trademark of Sublogic, F15 Is atrademarkof Mlcroprose 

SEND TO: MIcroCube Corp., P.O. Box 488, Leesburg, VA 22075 
(703) 777-7157 ^» 



80 



CLOCK/CALENDAR 

Cartridge for your 
Commodore 64 or 128 Computer 

Combines three most needed functions In a 
single plug-In cartridge: 

• Battery-Backed Clock/Calendar 

• Battery-Backed RAM 

• Application BOM Capability 
Features: 

• Crystal controlled clock keeps time in seconds, minutes, tiours, 
day ot the week, month and year wltti auto leap year. 

• 8K bytes of battery-backed RAt^rt included 

• Application ROM socket liandles up to 128K bytes of application 
software in EPROM. 

• Operating software in ROM included. 

• Automatic recognition of computer type (64 or 128) on power-up 
or reset. 

• Maintains power-otf. power-on log in RAM lordedlcaled control 
applications- 

• 30 day unconditional money-back guaranlee. 

CCSZ Cartridge $49.95 

Shipping & Handling: 

UPS Surface (USA Only) $3,00 

Foreign (Air Mail Only| $13.00 

Master Card, Visa, and Amex Welcome 
To Order Toll Free 800-421-7731 

Fronn California 800-421-7748 

Tech Support 916-823-3284 

Er^ JASON-RANHEIM 
^J 1805 Industrial Drive 

i^ Auburn. CA USA 95603 




EXCITING 

COMPUTER 

SIMULATIONS 



from 




CaiVIPUTE1=l COrMSULTAIMTB 



a™ Dvaiimlila liom SIGNAL COMPUTER CONSULTANTS. 
Ltd , P O Bo» 1 BZ22. Dtui 14, Poisburgh. PA 1 5236 
Of C*ll 1*121 655.7727 US and Csniria add t2.£0 
pctt^ge and handdng ^$4.00 (oreign) lor each (fame 
ardaied. PA reiid'SnTs i-icltjd» spleSi ui Use Msste^ 
Card. VISA, montfoidets m ch«ck£. drawn on LS or 
Canada banks, Masier Card and Visa show card num- 
b*r. f xpiraiiort dsle sn4 spgneluie We Quarantec and 
SuppOrl Dur produtTs. Free repi^cerntnt o' f jI! rclund 
iaf 30 day warranty period. Dealer inquiries itiuicsd 



UPER 




Creawd n ftipcnst !0 teeflDdCKt'om users o( Ti^e 
popular TRA/fii DISPATCHER pioflram. SUPEFI Di$- 
PATCHEn IS tne most etiensiwe CTC simulation onthe 
mariueT tod4Y 'or pergonal c&rriDuitn Three cofn- 
pleTaly dilorflnl Tcrrilorigi ara provided alang with 
jnew leetjiBt such as tlaetjng. tram riveniriQ. coniml 
Gwqr clock ipoed. anti carriCtC'T* rtndorrmtliQn o' 
diapAichin^ situation^ Programmed in assembly 
laT^Bu^Cft, auPCHOISPATCHERprovideilciriiahtr^ing- 
fast response lo vourccmmands as fsu muzt up lo 60 
Tfiina ovar K-inglB, doubly and Triple track terriioneS' 

Available lor th^ Cammodore 64 (disk oni\] ai 
S3500 KfyOoard Terroiate entf cofnprehensive in- 
Jtruction mar^ual included 




\¥\U\i\U22r 



LOCOMOTIVE SWITCHEH bnnQs an opeiatdng 
j-iilroad lavoui T^ the COMMODORE &4 computer 
scietn, The microlavQ'ui consists o( mainime. sn 
swjiches and s«ven loading aieas. Sophisticated cat- 
ooimn logic jimgltftei U*rn mos/eminijio P degrse 
not possible un real' model idikogd layouli. 

LOCOMOTIVE SWITCHER operates in iwq 
modes As a FLAT YAFID cjrs miisi b« ' fponad' ai 
aisigned toadirijj docks - or pulled out lo the main- 
line. In HUMP YARD mode the layout becomes a 
mirrhClassifjCBiian yard. Dp«iaTor performancit ls 
Tracked and scored bated on number of cars sconed, 
rtun moves, cai dsmage and operating time 

For COMMODORE W [duk only) at S30.00. 
Manual and keyboard lamplale included. 




You never tee the sirbmannes. Rely on sonar 
sounds to track and attack evading enemy largsU. 

As comimtrder ol a group ol ihraa df $'tJ'9ve''i.yau 
muti locale, pursue and Sink s 'WoHpack" □( 6 sub*. 
Guided onty by Ihe realistic pingmB ol returning 
sonar echoes and bfanngtQtaiQar. SQNAH SEARCH 
offers a unique and auihentic mmuiaiion ol WWII 
antisubmarme warfare. 

Available hr the CommorSoie S4 [dish onl» at 
SI 5.00. plus oostage artd handling. Includai fully 
rlluEtratad manual and hoyboarti template Not ra- 
commanded for children under 12. 



Destiny 



Software Investments Plus, Inc. 




Riddle of the Redstone 




me Riddle of t/?e Redstone, the search for 
a multi-miUlon dollar estate deed. 



P.O. Box 13 
Applclon City. MO 64724 
(816)476-1580 



Seek Your Destiny 

Your Mission is to enter the land of Adventura 
and retrieve tlie Kingdom that has been siezed 
by the Orcans and Deprived of die goodne.ss 
and prosperity the King Ecreip III strivcd to 
withhold. This mission is a complex and 
difficult one; it has been attempted by one 
other man, Sir Marcus Dracos; he never 
returned. Find the Mystery of the Crystal 
Key!! 

Be warned! The path you take will not be an 
easy one, nor will it be well-marked. You 
must use your savvy, your senses, and your 
survival skills to overcome the enemies you 
encounter, outwit the obstacles, and unravel 
the mystery of die crystal key, to discover 
what Destiny has in store for you! 

Available on the C64/128™, Apple II 
Series™ and the Macintosh™ 

Interactive Fictional Novel 



with Incredible Graphics, Sound and Clever 
riddles keep die excitement at a high pitch and 
your imagination peeked. You work against 
the clock beginning at Midnight with only a 
flashlight and estate diagrams to guide you. 
The Redstone Estate includes a 28 room 
mansion, stables, greenhouse, a rose graden 
maze, libraries, drawing room, secret caves 
and other surprises. This game is still e.xciting 
after you solve it just to see what else is there. 
The Riddle of die Redstone is fun and easy to 
operate for all ages. Ideal for ages six to 
eleven. 

Available for the C64/I28™ 

DEALER INQUIRIES IMVITED 



te 



□Product Roundup! ! 
(over 2000 products) 

□winter CES coverage 
(new hardware and 
software introductions) 

□info's first major 
investigative industry 
report- you'll laugfi, 
you'll cry, you'll be 
absolutely SHOCKED!! 

□a look at INFO'S little- 
known origins and 
techniques (or, "how 
to run a national 
publication from your 
basement, but not in 
your spar^ time.") 



81 



w 

1 


Draw A "Winner" 


L 
D 
C 


With 


A 
R 
D 

n 


^AVINew' 




-=^-- — --. 


^ 


— - — ■■ — 1 — »^— =^-*l 



^prom Inkwell 

S Systems^ 



a 
« 

V 
3 

a 

1 

^O Bo.a5l5?MB2gO • San D. ego CAg?13a yy^ 




Inkwell Systems 



K 



HOW 



$99^5^ 




INTERACTIVE HI-RES 
GRAPHIC SYSTEM 

Complete package includes 

Professional Quality 

Light Pen and Software 

• Use Id creale Artistic/ 
tectinical dfawings 

• Print in 3 sizes 
> Full tm yeat warranty 





K IlTT RODuci 





imm 



'A SERIES OF CLIP ART 

AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

FOR USE WITH 

AND 'SJU^'^^ 
Now Available: 

• HOLIDAY THEMES 

• CLIP-ART POTPOURRI 

• BOBDEBS4 3IGNS 

• MAPS OF THE WORLD' 




82 




Symbolic Assembler for the C-64 and a Disk Drive 



-k Written in 100% Machine Language 

• iVo Subroutine Calls made to $AOOO-BFFF 
Ideal for those who have upgraded their 
BASIC ROMS with EPROMS of their 
own design 

-kNot Protected; Archival Backup Permitted 

ic Uses RAM under ROM for Storage of Text 
and Symbolic Labels 

■*■ Two Pass Assembly with Linker Capability 

i^ Extensive Disk Support 

*: 32 Powerful Pseudo Opcodes 

if: 26 User Implemented Pseudo Opcodes 

if: Full Screen Editor with Built In Up /Down 
Scrolling 

i^Move, Swap, Delete, Renumber 

if: Auto Line Numbering for Easy Text Entry 

ir Forward or Reverse Storage of Object Output 
(Good for spelling strings backward) 

i^ Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, 
Division, Shift Left, Shift Right 



SAMPLE SOURCE CODE 



100 


cmp #SOF beq motfgot 


101 


cmp #S01 beq modgot 


102 


cmp #502 beq modgot 


103 


cmp #$06 beq modgot 


104 


cmp #$0A beq modgot 


105 


cmp #$08 beq modgot 


106 


jmp somewhere_else 


107 




lOSmodgot 


; do a module 


109 


stx module 


110 


Ida modvectors+l.x pha 


111 


Ida modvectors.x pha 


112 


Ida modslatus.x pha 


113 


rti 


114 




115some_slringS out ; XR = Length | 


116 


Idy tab 


117loop 




118 


mov strS.x (screen_meni),y 


119 


mov color (color_mem),y 


120 


iny dex 


122 


bne loop 


122 


ris 


123 





52995 



Mountain Wizardry Software 

P.O. Box 66134 

Portland, OR 97266 



BILLBOARD MAKER 

By Solutions Unlimited 

$29 95 ^'°^ ^P y°"'^ Pictures 
Create Mural Size Pictures 
INFO**** Rating 

Prints & Expands Pictures 4 of 16 times their size. 
Optimizes rough lines. Frames and Fonts for Overlays 
Strip Color, Reverse, Flip, Invert options. All Files 
saved, Print 1 or 16 Frames. Special Print/Splice routine 
creates strips for ease of alignment. Crop & Frame 
Picture. Convert Pictures between like formats, offset 
feature more detail in your own favorite graphic product. 
Print dump (Standard & Shaded) PLUS IVIORE 
FEATURES. Standard Page, 4 times, and 16 times 
(4ftx3ft) printouts. Supports Epson, Gemini, Panasonic, 
1525, & Canon PJ1080R Supports Doodle, Print Shop 
(Screen Magic), Supersketch, Animation Station, Koala, 
Blazing Paddles Flexidraw, Computer Eyes, Eye Scan. 



$21.95 



PHOTO FINISH 

By Solutions Unlimited 
MORE THAN A PRINTER UTILITY 



Optimizes your Graphics/ Pictures and Produces Hardcopy 
with 4 times the resolution of standard Print Dumps. 
(Hi-Res Formats). Modify color to change gray scale, 
gray scale Editor. Preview gray scale prior to printing. 
Modify color value in gray scale editor, even use letters 
or numbers as a gray scale. Rotate picture 90 to printer 
screen and page size dumps. Full control of printer 
commands to customize output and easy to use. The 
NOT JUST A PRINTER UTILITY you've waited for. 
Supports 1525, Epson, Panasonic, Okidata, Gemini, or 
compatibles. Supports same Graphic products as 
Biflboard Maker. 



ICON FACTORY V2 
*«_ Q By Solutions Unlimited 

^^9.95 EXCHANGE GRAPHICS 

Newsroom-Print Shop- Print Master 
INFO * * * * Rating 

Capture Graphics from Print Shop, Newsroom, Print 
Master, combine, mix, overlay with each other. Overlay 
your Graphics on your favorite picture. Convert Hi-Res 
to/from Multi Color, retain your color. Enlarge and smooth 
your Graphics with the Optimizer routine. Crop, Flip, 
Reverse & Strip color (Pictures). Enlarge your graphics 4 
or 16 times (on Screen). Create pictures to/from 
Graphics, Stretch, (horiz/vert) Graphics. NEW V2 
OPTION: REDUCTION ROUTINE TO CREATE 
GRAPHICS FROM PICTURES, S reduce those Newsroom 
Graphics for Print Shop & Print Master, Supports Hi-Res 
Print dump in 1525 or 1525 emulation mode. Supports 
same Graphics products as Billboard Maker plus, 
Newsroom, Print Master & Print Shop Graphics. 

SUPER DEALS 

COMPUTER EYES CALL 

CAMERA CALL 

FLEXIDRAW $79.95 

BODYLOG PRODUCTS 

NEW RELEASES UNDER $99.00 

4K MICROMEM CARTRIDGE ' $39.95 

BATTERY BACKUP-EASY TO USE 

ACTS AS DEVICE 12 - ADDRESS AS YOU WOULD A 

DISK DRIVE - MEMORY IS RETAINED EVEN WITH 

POWER OFF 

ALL PHONE ORDERS $2.00 CREDIT 



Xstec Super 


$74.95 


MW3S0 w/2k bufjar 


$59.95 


Omnilronics RS232 


$39.95 


Omnitronics Serial 


$69.95 


Nawsroom 


$36.95 


ClipArtMI. Of III 


$23.95 


Print Shop 


$34.95 


Graphics 1 , 2, or 3 


$t9.95 


Print Mastar 


$24.95 


Art Gallery 1, II, or III 


$19.95 


FLEXIDRAW 


$84.95 


FlBxifont 


$21.95 


Graphic Gallaria 


$19.95 


Kyan Pascal Advanced 64 


$59.95 


Kyan Pascal Advanced 128 


$59.95 


FexRl6l28&64NEW 


$39.95 


B08C0 World Geography 


$19.95 


Cobol123or64 


$39.95 



R J Softshop Graphics 

Print Shop Graphics $14.95 

Th erne for Print Shop $ 1 2. 95 

High Res for Print Shop $18.95 

An Gallery • Prim Master $17.95 

News Clip Art $17,95 
Best Accounting 64/1 28 

Accounts Payable $49.95 

Aa:ounts Receivable $49.95 

General Ledge r $59 . 95 

Inventory Manager $59.95 

Project Planner $59.95 

Fleet System III 128 $65.00 

Super Base 64 $59.00 

Super Base 123 $65.00 

Super Base Book $14.95 

Geos $49.95 

Font Pack $22.95 

Desk Pack $24.95 

GEOS GUIDES Disk Access. $19.95 

PAPERCLIP II 128 $65.00 



BODYLINK 

Muscle Development Pkg. 
Cardio Exercise Pkg. 
Stress Reduction Pkg. 

Partner 128 

Partner 64 
Mach 5 G4/1 28 
Disk Doubler 
Parallel A/B switch 
RS 232 A/B switch 
Combo 50/30 col sw CI 28 
Visastar 64or 128 
Pocket Series 



$149.95 
$179.95 
$205.95 



59.95 
49.95 
35.95 
8.95 
44.95 
44.95 
19.95 
85.00 



CALL 



To Order: CALL or WRITE 

SOFTWARE LINK 914/683-2512 

P.O. Box 391 White Plains, N.Y. 10602 



55' 



isjo EXTRA Charge 



TERMS Sentj cNeck or money order for tolal pur. 
criasB pr-ce plus S2 75 for shrppmg via UPS S4 00 
lor stiippirig non UPS PersongI crvechs r Allow 10 

days 10 clear 

NV RESIOfNTS ADD APPLICABLE TAXES 



SOFTWARE LINK 

383 Marnaroneck Ave 

While Plains, NY 

914/683-2512 

jratail outl«ll 






ris 



sW> 



Teaches Chess 
$49.95 . 




\ssE« 



1 J131— 1 Jt. ,^a«' 

tournament piaV^ ^ w,ll see c _ ^^^^ 3, 

^" . _ „,niDling Ot W"" ' ^,„riualChecK _ Lope 



^ow,over40h;u^;;„ericanOpen- --top master .= _■ ^^^^ 

Stf'^ t pters the techn'd"^ ° to life on the 

tournament piaye w,ll see c _ ^^^^ 3,„b,t 

■ a<iampli"9°' perpetual ChecK . Buy Lop» 

Hereisasamf^ '^J &zugi^ang . scotch e»;;^^ 

. French D«'^"'' 



■ Rules 

. surprise Ch^^^^ 
. Greed 

. pins 
. Forks 

. sacfilices 
. BlocKades 

. King i "^^ o„ok 
.The Active R°°'' 



perpetual Check 

'.Spo^^^^r 

.Mated paw 

. passed Pa^-^^i^gs 

. Triangulat"'" 3,„ 

HvpeTmoder" An- 

C,assicOpeni"9S 

rtiii-JTftS 



Atari ST \^** 



Qui«8^, ,6achP>e=« 
. Tactics fof^'.^" opening 

• Brill*'"' °S„ Escort 
•^'"^'pLnB'^akthrougli 
•fl^'rnlor Bishops 

•°^^?rBrp^«"^°'""' 

•<^°°'; a Material 
•^S^-:;.ingVari- 
• f^gSbinations 

and more' 



ROAD 
MAPS 



*n 4 pawn Endings ••■ .keeptrac^"' 

■h iuve Rook .^.ROADMAPthatljg Sarts oMh; 



frefich u<:" 

'sicilianD«<«"^^ 
Cjro-Kann 
Pjrc Defense 
center Co^-'^' 
'. English opehina 
.Birds opening 

•^'^^::rope« 

. sokolskys"!'.^^ 
.Benko'sOpen'ng 

.Quoer.'sGam'^" 
King's Indian 
.BenoniD^'^"^^ 

. Queen's M';; 

. .-I 




COFFEEHWI 

MONSTER 



^"^^'°P',rvP"""^°P''°"""'~''' -dekeycalls f' 



om^ 



outosavean"-^'^'^,tethemia«.. 

j^nli^teiunent.i 



...ando'^^'^' ^ .,n TEACHES CHESS! 

T.ePAOL WHITEHEAD TEA_ 

YES! Please rush met^^^^^^^^^ 

Name _ — -—"■■" ^____ — -—-'~'^'\^^ __ Zip 

Address 

City 



\ 
\ 

\ 
\ 
\ 

V 
I 



______ — -~^ Staw — - ^ 

tax) per^n^pirnez St., Sar' ^'".^^ ^, ^^der. ^ wan 






OlBMPC'PCi^- 



Enclosed is'- S- 



Q Atari ST 



SALE SUPER VALUES Tsave 

PROTECTO KNTERPRIZKS 



SINGLE SIDED/DOUBLE 
DENSITY DISKS 

.29 ea. 

100% Certified 5'/i" floppy disks. Lifetime 
Warranty, automatic lint cleaning liner 
included. 1 Box of 100 $29.00 List SI. 99 ea 
SALE $.29 ea. 

VOICE SYNTHESIZER 
SALE$2Q Q^ 

^2^ • ^%J List $89 

Just plug it in and you can program words 
and sentences, adjust volume and pitch, 
make talking adventure games, sound action 
games and customized talkies! PLUS 
($19,95 value) TEXT TO SPEECH program 
included FREE. (Disk or Tape) List $89.00 
SALE $29,95 

VOICE COMMAND 
MODULE 



SALE $29,95 



List $80 



The VCM is a speech recognition device that 
lets you give commands to your C-64 with 
your voice. List $79.95 SALE $29.95 

SUPER AUTO DIAL MODEM 
SALESIQ QC 

^:^ t^tj List $99 

Easier to use than dialing your telephone. 
Features on-line clock, dialing from 
keyboard, capture and display high 
resolution characters, and much more. 
Includes exclusive easy to use program for 
up and down loading to printer and disk 
drives. Besl in U.S.A. List $99.00 SALE 
S29.95 

1200 BAUD MODEM 
SALE$7Q QC 

# ^ •^%J List $199 

Same features as the above modem along 
with C-128 mode and 1200 Baud speed. List 
S199.00 SALE $79.95 

SOFXWA.RE 

ACCIIS 

ACTION PACK (D) il9.« 

LEADER BOARD (D) 23.»5 

COURSES FOR LEADER BOARD (D) 13.95 

MACH 5 (Q !».« 

MACH 128 (C) 21.95 

TENTH FRAME (D) U.95 

ACCOlADt 

ACE OF ACES (D) 5IS.95 

DAM BUSTERS (D) 1J.95 

FIGHT NIGHT (D) 1S.M 

HARDBALL (D) 1S.95 

LAW OF THE WEST (D) 18.95 

KILLED UNTIL DEAD (D) U.95 

COSMI 

SUPER HUEY II (D) 511.95 

TALLADEGA (D) 10.95 

BEYOND FORBIDDEN FOREST (D) 10.95 



■CI 

PRO GOLF BY TOM WEISKOPF (D) 511.95 

MR. TESTER (D) 5.95 

PRINTERS LIB. I (D) S.9S 

PRINTERS LIB. 2 (D) 1.95 

DATABASE MCR./PLUS FOR CI28 (D) 14.95 

TASK FORCE (D) , 4.95 

BRODERBUHD 

PRINT SHOP <D) 525,95 

GRAPHICS LIB- 1,2 or 3 (D> 15.95 

COMPANION (D) 22.95 

TOY SHOP ID) 38.95 

WHERE IS CARMEN SAN DIEGO (D) 21.95 

GRAPHICS LIB. HOLIDAY ED. (D) 15.95 

DAT* EAST 

COMMANDO (D) 522.95 

KARATE CHAMP |D) 22.95 

KUNG FU MASTER (D) 22,95 

DAT* SOFT 

221 B BAKER .STREET (D) 517.95 

MERCENARY (D) 17,95 

NEVER ENDING STORY (D) 17.95 

MIND PURSUIT ID) 17.95 

VIDEO TITLE SHOP (D) 17.95 

THEATRE EUROPE (D) 19.95 

DE5I0NWARI 

BODY TRANSPARENT (D) S14.95 

EU ROPEAN NATIONS & LOCATIONS (D) 21.95 

STATES AND TRAITS (D) 22.95 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

HEART OF AFRICA (D) $9.95 

ONE ON ONE (D) 9.95 

PINBALL CONTRUCTION (D) 9.95 

MUSIC CONSTRUCTION |D) 9.95 

RACING DESTRUCTION (D) 9.95 

MARBLE MADNESS <D| 22.95 

CHESSM ASTER (D) 25.95 

BATTLEFRONT (D) 25.95 

LORDS OF CONQUEST (D) 22,95 

ILUt CHIP 

BARON {D} 514.95 

MILLIONAIRE (D) 14.95 

TYCOON ID) 14.95 

ipvx 

CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING (D) 521.95 

FAST LOAD (C) 11.95 

MOVIE MONSTER (D) 11.95 

WINTER OA.MES (D> 11.95 

WORLD GAMES (D) 11.95 

WORLD KARATE (D) 14.95 

WORLD'S GREATEST FOOTBALL (D) 22.95 

FIBEtlRD 

COLOSSUS CHESS (D) 520.95 

ELITE 64 (D) 18.95 

FRANKIE GOES TO HOLLYWOOD (D) 19.95 

BATTLE OF BRITAIN/BATTLE OF MIDWAY |0) 9,95 

IWO JIMA.'FAULKLANDS (D) 9.95 

TALKING TEACHER (D) 22.95 

HI-TECH EXPRESSiOHS 

CARD WARE (D) 56.95 

HEART WARE (D) t.95 

PARTY W ARE(D) 9.95 

WARE WITH ALL KIT (D) 9.95 

HOLIDAY PRINT PAPER <D) 7.95 

lUI— LOGIC 

FLIGHT SIMULATOR II (D) 531.95 

JET (D) 15.95 

FOOTBALL (D) 25.95 

BASEBALL (D) 31.95 

S.S.I, 

ROADWAR 2000 <D) $13.95 

BATTLE OF ANTIETAM (D) 31.95 

GETTYSBURG (D) 31.95 

MECH BRIGADE (D) 32.95 

NAM (D> 13.95 

U.S.A. A.F- (D) 32.95 

KA.MPFGRUPPE (D) 32.95 

WAR SHIP (D) 32.95 

HAYDIN 

SARCON II (D) 59.95 

SAT VERBAL (D) 14.95 

SAT MATH <DI 14.95 

SAT PRATICE TEST (D) 14.95 

SOFTSYHC 

ACCOUNTANT. INC. C128 (D) $59.95 

DESK MANAGER (D) 24.95 

KID PRO QUO (D) , 19.95 

MODEL DIET (D) 19.95 

TRIO C64 (D> 19.95 

SPINHAKER 

DELTA DRAWING (Cy 54.95 

NUMBER TUMBLERS (Q 4.95 

SEA SPELLER (C) 4.95 

UP & ADD'EM (C) 4.95 



BEST SERVICE IN THE 

U.S.A. • 90 DAY 

REPLACEMENT 

WARRANTY • ONE DAY 

EXPRESS MAIL • 15 DAY 

FREE TRIAL • OVER 500 

PROGRAMS • A CUSTOMER 

LIST OF OVER 3,000,000 

LARGEST IN THE U.S.A. 



CALL FOR FREE 

CATALOG WITH $2,00 

OFF COUPON! 



SPECIAL BONUS 
COUPON 



We pack a special software discount 
coupon with every Commodore 64 
Computer, Disk Drive, Printer, or 
Monitor we sell! This coupon allows 
you to SAVE OVER $250 off sale 
prices! 



(EXAMPLES) 

PROFESSIONAL SOFTWARE! 

COMMODORE 64 



Name 

B. I. Homepak 
Super Huey II 
Flighl Control Joystick 
Newsroom 
Leader Board 
TV Tuner 
Commando 
Create with Garfield 
Geos 

SAT The Perfect Score 
World Games 
Trinity 
C128 Partner 
Robotics Workshop 
C128 Programmers 
Reference Guide 



List Sale Coupon 



S49.95 
S19.95 
S19.95 
S49.95 
139.93 
199,95 
S34,93 
S29.95 
S59.95 
S69.95 
S39.95 
S34.95 
$69.95 
S 149.95 
J2I.95 



S19.93 
S12.95 
SI2.95 

S32.95 
S23.95 
S49.93 
$22,95 
$16.95 
$39.95 
$42.95 
$24.95 
$24.95 
$49.95 
$124.95 
$12.95 



$17.95 
$11.95 
510.00 
$29.95 
$22,95 
$39.93 
$21.95 
$14.95 
$37.95 
$39.93 
$22.95 
$22.95 
$44.95 
$114.93 
$9.95 



(See over 100 coupon items in our catalog.) 

Write or Call for sample 

Special Software 

Coupon! 



PHONE ORDERS 

8 a.m. - 8 p.m. C.S.T. Weekdays 

9 a.m. - 12 noon C.S.T. Saturdays 
<:3a2> 382-S244 



Add $3.00 for shipping, handling, and insurance. Illinois residents please add 6'/?% 
sales tax. Add $6.00 (or CANADA. PUERTO RICO, HAWAII, ALASKA, APO-FPO 
Ofdefs. All orders must be in U.S. Dollars. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER 
COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA, Enclose Coshief Check. Money Order or Personal 
Check. Allow I Jt days for delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, 1 day express mail. 
Prices & Avollobilrty subject to change without notice. Hardware shipping prices 
vory according to weight. Please coll for amount. No APO-FPO for Monitors. 
VISA— MASTER CARD— C.O.O. C.O.D. on phone orders only. 



THE PROTECTO WARRANTY 

All Protecto's producis carry ci minimum 90 day warranty. If anything 
foils wilfiin 90 days from the date of purchase, simply send your product 
to us via United I'orcel Service prepaid. We will IMMEDIATELY send yoip 
a replacement at no charge via United Parcel Service prepaid. This 
warranty proves that Wo Lovo Our CuMtomorM. 



SALE 



SUPER DEALS 

(312) 382-5244 TO OHIJKU 



SAVE 




COMMODORE 64c 
COMPUTER 
SALE $1^0 Off 

JL%yjy » ^%J List $299 
Every Commodore 64c includes the GEOS 
program. List $299.00 SALE $159.95 

1541 DISK DRIVE 
SALE $170 QS 

X /JX«J^*J List $249 

To run all that software and add to the 
prestige of your system, you'll want the 
1541 disk drive. Runs all of the 3,000 plus 
pieces of software for the Commodore 64. 
List $249.00 SALE $179.95 




COMMODORE 128 
COMPUTER 

SALE $299.00 



List S399 



This powerful 128K computer has 
modes. List $399.00 SALE $299.00 



three 



340K 1571 DISK DRIVE 

^D V • \J\j List $349 

Double sided, single disk drive for the C-128 
allows you to use the C-128 mode plus CPM 
mode. 17 times faster than the 1541, and 
runs all the 1541 formats. List $349.00 
SALE $259.00 



BIG BLUE PRINTER 



SALE $39.95 



List $199 




This is the affordable printer you have been waiting for! This 6Vi" letter size, 80 column 
dot matrix, heat transfer printer features upper and lower case, underline, graphics, word 
processing, and much more. List $199.00 SALE $39.95 

PREMIUM QUALITY 

150-170 CPS COMSTAR 

AERO 160 PRINTER 

SALE $199.00 L.S499 

The Comstar Aero 160 gives you a 10" carriage, 150-170 CPS, 9x9 dot matrix with double 
strike capability for 18x18 dot matrix (near letter quality), high resolution bit image 
(120x144 dot matrix), underline, back spacing, left and right margin setting, true lower 
descenders with super and subscripts, prints stantfard, block graphics and special 
characters. It gives you print quality and features found on printers costing twice as much! 
(Centronics Parrallel Interface) List $499.00 SALE $199.00 




PRINTER/TYPEWRITER 
COMBINATION 

SALE $199.95^^,^^ 

Superb Silver Reed letter quality daisy 
wheel printer/ type writer combination, just 
a flick of the switch to interchange. Extra 
large carriage, typewriter keyboard, 
automatic margin control, compact, 
lightweight, drop in cassette ribbon! (90 day 
warranty) Centronics Parrallel Interface is 
built in. List 299.00 SALE $199.95 



COMSTAR 1000 PRINTER 

SALE $179.95 33,, 

This is one of the best values today. Print 
letters, documents, ect., at 100 characters 
per second and has Near Letter Quality 
mod?. Features are dot addressable 
graphics, adjustable tractor and friction 
feed, margin settings, pica, elite, condensed, 
italics, super & subscript, underline, bold, 
and tiouble strike. Commodore Interface 
Included. List $349.00 SALE $179.95 



12" 80 COLUMN 
MONITOR 
SALE$fiQ QS 

O^t^J List $129 

Super High Resolution green screen 
monitor. 80 columns x 24 lines, easy to 
read, plus easy to adjust control knobs. 
Supreme Quality . Fantastic value, (cable 
$9.95) List $129.00 SALE $89.95 



I ^,==1 



14" COLOR MONITOR 
SALE$tlQ QS 

l.%jymZy%y List $329 
This premium quality monitor comes with 
speaker and audio hook up. High 
Resolution, clear screen, 40 columns x 24 
lines, front panel controls and more. Also 
be use with VCR. One year Ltd. warranty, 
(cable $9.95) List $329.00 SALE $139.95 




14" RGB & COMPOSITE 
COLOR MONITOR 

SALE $237.00 Li. $399 

Must be used to get 80 columns in color with 
80 colunrm computers (C128 - IBM - Apple) 
(RGB cable $19.95) Add $14.50 shipping. 
List $399.00 SALE $237.00 

TV TUNER 

SALE $49.95 ^^^^3,3„ 

This tuner has dual UHF/YHF selector 
switches, mute, automatic fine tuning and 
computer/TV selector switches. Hook it up 
between your computer and monitor! Inputs 
included for 300 ohm, 75 ohm, and UHF. 
List $129.95 SALE $49.95 



CALL BEFORE YOU ORDER: 

• OUR PRICES MA Y BE 

LOWER & AND WE OFFER 

SPECIAL SYSTEM DEALS * 



ATTENTION 

COMPUTER CLUBS • DEALERS 
Wb offer big volume discouniti 

CALL XODAY 



PROTECTO ENTERPRIZES 

We ILove CPur CustOMners 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, Illinois 60010 

(312) 382-5244 to order 



Sensational Prices! 

. . . On Our Most Popular Items! 



from micfolal' 

THE 59$ DISKETTE! 

Are you paying too much for diskettes? Try our first 
quality, prime, 5V4" diskettes (no rejects, no seconds) 
at these fantastic sale prices and save, save, SAVE! 
Disks are packaged in boxes of 50; each tjox contains 
5 shrink-wrapped lO-packs that include diskettes in 
sleeves, labels, and write-protect tabs. 

Each diskette is certified to be 100% error free and 
comes with a lifetime warranty (if you have a problem, 
we'll replace Ihe diskette) All diskettes include hub rein- 
forcement rings and v/rile-protect notch. 

All diskettes are double density and work in either 
single or double density drives. 

SS, DD Diskettes. Box of 50 
32391 



DS. DD Diskettes. Box of 50 
32403 



$29.50-59e Ba.l 
S34,50-69c ea.! 



POWER and PROTECTION 
FOR YOUR C-64!® 




on 



POW'R PAK 64 

from MicroPal" ' ^ 

Powr Pak is a replacement power supply (1.5 amp) 
for the Commodore 64- but that's not all! Powr 
Pak also supplies two additional surge protected out- 
lets (120V) for monitor, disk drive, or other peripher- 
als. On/off switch. Fuse protection. Sturdy all-metal 
casing is ventilated for heat dissipation. Full 5 year 
warranly, 

.34910 S49.95, 



$ 



LOWEST PRICES IN U.S.A.! 

i£©iir 



SEIKOSHA 
EPSON 



ANCHOR AUTOfUIATION 
XETEC INDUS 



$ 



We can offer you some of the lowest prices in tfie country on the most popular printers, mon- 
itors and interfaces. Our normal prices are already low, but to make sure you get Ihe best deal 
you can, we will also meet most competitive prices in this publication when placed on an equal 
basis (Remember — we don't charge for use ol your credit card, irrjpose excessive Shipping fees, 
or use any other hidden extras to boost the price you pay. Due (0 ffie rapid change in prices in 
the computer industry, we can only meet prices at the time you place your order: we cannot adjust 
prices on items ordered or shipped on an earlier dale.) Another plus for charge card customers 
— your charge Card is billed at time ol stiiprrieni only for the items shipped — no early billing, 
no long wait for the merchandise you already paid for 



COMMODORE 
C-ISB' Compuler SCALL 



I57I Disk Driue 
1902A Ivlonilor 
1B70 Mortem 



SCALL 
SCALL 
SCALL 



EPSON 
FX-85 
FX-2e6 

STAR fJIICRONICS 

NX-IO 

NX-IOC 

NL-10 



FAMOUS NAME SOFTWARE 

SCALL Epyx 

SCALL Broderbund 

Abacus 

Efectronic Arts 
SCALL Timeworks 

SCALL f/icroProse 

SCALL Activision, ancf many more' 



• THE BEST PRICES* 

• THE BEST SERVICE* 

WHY SHOP 
ANYWHERE ELSE? 



THE FAMOUS SLIK STIK™ 

The Slii( Stik''-' t!js been a fmonle for years and 
lor good reasor^ It's just ttie tight con^bmahon ol 
responsiveness and accuracy And the price cant 
be beat' FromSuncom 90 day vjarraniy. Conned! 
diiectly to Commodore Computers 
42086 S6.9f: 



ONLY S6.95! 




EDUCATORS! 

We have a catalog pst lor you' It's chock 
lull of software, tiardware and atcessories 
designeil for use m sctiools Irom 
elementary to college level Products are tor 
Apple IBW. Commodore. Tl and ott^e: com- 
puters used in schools across Ihe ccunlry 
And here's the best part our low, kw/ prices 
will stretch your dollars (anher and lei you 
accomplish more 

Call 1-e00-3i)a-277S now 
and request our Education Cala log I 



fc^ Home Automation Is Here^ 

— X-10 POWERHOUSE 

win vow Comrrodofe6J Of i^acorr^uiff i.'V tr? x^O Ptw"'- 
- -ij- T- \ , fwusftlnier^ce. yoi can proQ^m rights and spistiintes to ii^rn 
\\.V*V\ on and art. mea^ your tfiermosiai, and much mme The vssi- 
^ fnentfy PwwtttBC sofrwaffi less you rifs se! up^ iwr house, 
rhcn itifi on-screefi soltvyare shows you rtow iq S'BS a module 
for each Nght anfl a,[i[^iarce !□ be conrraUM OfiCfi you've k- 
ta&i-shed trie progfam. you wn d(scDn:ris:i me compuiei - in& Rr^ihouM sysiem 
will control your home independenily Up to 256 lamps and appJrances can be con- 
trolled L;5ing X-lO Type (rodules ln\v the aje of eJectiprtc hvnG' Wa» SI35** 
36493 XtO PthverriDuse interlace 

Ci}mrnQdi34''e C^blc & ^oiiw^re Mow Only S49.9^ 

27001 UT3 UodiilE Sll.«5 37016 2.pii AoQiiafice Mcdu..- Sl3 95 

3T0Z0 Wall Swiich Module S13.9S 2MD5 3 Fin Apph^ncs Mcdu- SS9.95 




CARTRIDGE EXPANDER 

^^^^ Plus S22.95 

^■^ FAST LOAD 

^^ OFFER! 

Slop wearing out yoyr computer by enflless cgnridge swapping! 

The fnJavarone cartridge expander features 3 caflndge slots Reset 

the compuler mdependenily of the power switch Cantidge slots 

are vertica] for easy access -^ no blind lumbl<fig behind ihe 

compjier 

33327 3slo! Carlndge Expander S22.95 

The cartridge expandef 15 a great companran for ihe Epyx Fast Load 
cartridge — you can keep it permanently installed plus have two 
slats free for other cartridges! 
3421fi Fast Load Cartridge (Sug, Re\a\\ S3995) S24.95 

Fast Load Only S22.95 
with purchase of cartridge expander! 



'^ DUST COVER and 
"EVERYTHING BOOK" 

SPECIAL OFFER 

Get to Know us by ordering this great dust 
cover for your C-64 or C-t28 and our catalog, 
Ttie Everyttiing Book lor Itie C-64 and C-1 28 
Home Computers," for S2-95 (no extra ship- 
ping and handling charges). Cover is antisraiic, 
translucent 8<iauge vinyl sewn (o our exacting 
standards with reinforced seams. Discover the 
savings and easy stripping available Irom 
TENEX Computer Express! 




$2.95 



3t527 C-64 Dust Cover and Catalog (H2C) 
aBt64 C-128 Dust Cover and Catalog (HZC) 



fThe Right Interface For AlP 
I Your Prititing Needs!! 

I 'a sound investment far your 

•ripl iL Commodom" RUN. Dec as 

tI ^JV^* ^'"^ fiigh performance graphics 

* '•"^ parallel pnnier inlerface lioni OSl lor 

C-6 J .ind VIC-20 eirtulales a Commcmofe prtnier Come? w;h 

cable; and user's inaaual 

33565 $39.95 

Super Gr3phiX. Fealures BK l)ut(er. TO piintrng 
I : : " 3 THetnafsciEen dumps and tpp rrourced dip ^vitchas 
-::^z'::r.-i superscnpl. subscrrpi. underlining Doid tacs. af.3 
.J choice ol 9 cbaracier widths. Fiom Xatec 

41769 S69.95 

oUpSr LsirSpniX Jr. Amoj^eeconomxalversicncl 

■ r :■■,?,:■■■■ IplllunncigracriicS- normalandCorresDon' 

1; i.iiimn Cnrnnalitile with afl major pnnlers From 

41774 S49.95 



From Your Friends At 

T€N€X 




We gladly accept 
mail orders! 

P.O. Box 6578 
Soutti Bend, IN 46660 

Questions? Call 
219/259-7051 



Ad 
H2C 



SHIPPING CHARGES 

ORDER AMOUNT CHARGE 

less than 320,00 

S20,00-S39.99 

S40.00-S74.99 

575.00-5149.99 

5150.00-5299,99 

5300 & up 



NO EXTRA FEE FOR CHARGES 



S3,75 
4.75 
5.75 
6.75 
7.75 
S.75 
Foreign O'Seis add S4 OD Heavy ilems ship al actual cost 




WE VERIFY CHARGE CARD 
ADDRESSES 

ORDER TOLL FREE 

1-800-348-2778 

INDIANA ORDER LINE 1-80D-Z25-6838 



FREE! 



BONUS GIFT WITH ANY SOFTWARE ORDER — AN EXCELLENT PUBLIC 
DOMAIN VERSION OF AN ARCADE HIT GAME ON ITS OWN DISK. 



ARCADE 

A.C.E S14.95 

Ace 01 Aces 19,95 

Bop and Wrestle ..*,_., 19,95 

Championship Basebail 23,95 

Charnpionship Wresllmg 26-95 

Destroyer 26.95 

EIHe 1995 

FiBht Nighl 1 9.95 

Flighl Simulator II 32,95 

Scenery Disks (Set o1 Si»| 7S.95 

Slar Scenery Disks 16.95 

GBA Two on Two Baskettjall 23.95 

Gary Kitchen's Game Maker 26.95 

Game Maker Sports/Science Disks 13.93 

Hardball 19.95 

Leader Board .,, 26.95 

Tournament Oisk 13. 9S 

Executive Tournament Disk #1 ....... ., 13,95 

Marble Madness 19. 9S 

MicroLeague Baseball 26.95 

1984 or 1985 team Disk , 13.95 

World Series or All Slar Disk , 13.95 

General Manage-'s Disk 26.95 

BojtScores/SlatDisk 16.95 

Racing DestfJCtion Set 12.95 

Spitfire 40 23.95 

Star Hank Bojing 19.95 

Superbowl Sunday 20 95 

19B4 1 1985 Data Disks , 13,95 

Super Cycle 26,95 

Tenth Frame 26.95 

World Games 26.95 

World Karate Championship 21.95 



ADVENTURE AND MIND GAMES 

Alter Ego (Male oi Female) S33.9S 

Astrolog y Horoscope Maker 1 5.95 

Bard's Tale 25.95 

BaltlBlront 26.95 

Chessmaster 2000 28.95 

Fairlight 19,95 

Heart of Alrica 1?9S 

Hilchiker's Guide 24,95 

Leaiher Goddesses of Phobos 26 95 

Lords 01 Crjnquest 26 95 

Moebius 29,95 

Movie Maker 25.95 

Ogre 26.95 

Pawn 26.95 

PhanSasiefor Phanlasiell) 26.95 

Rings at Zelfin 24.95 

Seyen Cities ol Gold 12,95 

Strip Poker 20.95 

Ultimate Wijard 19.95 

Where IS Carmen Sandiego 23 95 

Wizard's Crown 26-95 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Bank Streel Storybook $27.95 

Cave 01 The Word Wizard 1695 

Donald Duck's Playground 16,95 

Evelyn Wood's Dynamic Reader 35.95 

Gertrude's Secrets 20.95 

Grammer EicarTliner 30.95 

Perfect Score SAT "9 95 

Reader Rabbll 26.95 

Sky Travel ^^ '^ 

The Game Show 23 95 

Grade Level Sirbject Disks 13 95 

Tic Tac Show .- 23.95 

Subject Diskettes ' S'^S 

Typing Tutor III 26.95 

Winnie the Pooh 1 B.95 



WORD PROC.-DATA BASES-SPREAD SHEETS 
Batteries Incl. - Home Organizer Series 

Audio/Video Catalog S13.95 

Checkbook or Elec, Add, Book 1395 

Home Inventory or Mail List 13 95 

Photos/Slides/Home Movies '395 

Recipes or Stamps 13.95 

Fleet System 2 (Limited Quantity) 29,95 

Multiplan ■'2 95 

Pocket Planner/Writer/or Filer 27.95 



GRAPHICS 1 MUSIC 

Adv. Music Sys (MIDI compatible! $49,95 

B-Graph (Limited Quamilyl 19.95 

Billboard Maker 29,95 

Christmas Paper Kit 1695 

Computer Eyes 99 95 

Coirip. Eyes Compatibility Disks 12,95 

Doodle 26.95 

Flemdraw 79.9S 

GEOS 40,95 

GEOS Fonlpacki 19.95 

Graphics Expander (Springboard) ............ 23.95 

Graphics PfintShop/Master(EPYX| 16.95 

Icon Factory 29,95 

Music Studio 19.95 

Newsroom , 34.95 

Newsroom Clip Art #1 or *3 21.95 

Newsroom Clip Art flZ 23 95 

Photo Finish 2395 

PrintMaster (Program) 26 95 

PrinlMaster An Gallery 1 & 2 15.95 

Print Shop (Program) 29,95 

Print Shop Companion 23.95 

Print Shop Gr Lib 1 or 2 or 3 16.95 



MISCELLANEOUS 

1 541 Physical Exam , . 533,95 

Assembler/Monitor 64 (AhacusJ 26.95 

COBOL 64 28.95 

Copy II 54/126 V 2.6 26.95 

CSM Disk Alignmenl 32.95 

Disks (Boxes ol lODSyDD) 6.95 

Mach 5 23.95 

Snapshot 40 95 

SuperKit)541 2395 

COMMODORE 126 SOFTWARE 

Basic Language Compiler 128 S45.95 

C-D 3-D Canvas 52.95 

CadPak 128 (Abacus) 45.95 

Bob's Pro Term 59.95 

Mach 128 (acceileraies 128 loads) 34.95 

PocketWriter/Planner/or Filer 128 34.95 

Par1ner128 39.95 

Superbase 12B 69.95 

Trinity 23.95 



AMIGA SOFTWARE 

Aegis Animator $94 95 

Aegis Draw 135 00 

Aegis Images 54 95 

Analyze (Spreadsheet) 69 95 

ArcticFox , 29 95 

Brataceus 35,95 

DellaPatrol 1695 

Deluxe Paint 59 95 

Art Disk 22 95 

Deluxe Print 69.95 

Art Disk 2295 

Deluxe Video 69 95 

Marker 3195 

Halley Project 31 95 

Infocom Titles in stock CALL 

Marble Madness 35 95 

Mind Shadow 3195 

Music Studio 42 95 

One On One 29 95 

PrintMaster 34 95 

PrintMaster An Gallery 19 95 

Rogue 24.95 

Scribble (Word Processor) 69 95 

Seven Cities ol Gold 29,95 

Skylox 29 95 

HARDWARE AND PERIPHERALS 

Disk Nolcher (Interex) ,..,,.. $ 5 95 

Esles Power-Pack (Serviceable) 4i 95 

McPen (High-fles Light Per) 40.95 

Messinger Modem (300 BAUD) ., 49.95 

MicroStufler Buffer (ttk) 59.95 

M ig h ty Moij se 44.95 

Omni-Tronics RS-232 Interface 39.95 

PPI Interlace 39.95 

Power Pack (Maxtron or Commodore) 26.95 

Pro-Tech Vinyl Cover C64 or C128 5 35 

Vinyl Cover- 1S41 or 1571 5 35 

Vinyl Cover - Most Printers 6 50 

Vinyl Cover - Most Monitor^ 10.95 

RiObons - 1525/801 Printers 7,95 

Ribbons - 1 526/802 Printers 8.96 

Ribbons - Okimale BIk 54 95/Color 5 25 

Ribbons - Slar SG10 Si 95;Color 3.95 

Ribbons - Other CALL 

Six Outlet Surge Protector 21.95 

Tac2Joystick5 9.95 

Xelec Super Graphic Interlace 62 95 



Sideways 



19.95 



Superbase 64 52.95 

Swiltcaic w/Sideways 35.95 

Sylvia Porter's Pers. Finance '"'■95 




LEROrS CHEATSHEETS 

Basic 

Blanks (3) 

C»lc Result Adv 

CaIc. Result Easy 

Comat|i->i 

The Consultant 

Orsk 151(1 

Ooofllfi 

Easy Scnpl 

Elite 

Fleet System II 

Flight Sirnuiaior II 

For the Beginner 

I3E0S 

Has Writer 

Logo Sheet 1 

Logo Sheet 2 

The Manager 

Wulliplan 

New5rot:m 

Omniwriter 



C-64 S 2.95 

Paperclip 
Praclicalc 
Praclicalc II 
Pimtefs 

Epson RXeo 

Gemmi 10X 

1525/801 

Mtcioline 
Quicli Brown Fox 
Pocket Wriler 
Simon 5 Basic 
Sky Travel 
Speed scrrpi 
Sprites Only 
Superbase fiit 
Terminals 

Smart64 

Vidlex 

VIP 
Word PrDc3+ 
Word Pro S4 



LEROV'S CHEATSHEETS C-12B S 6.50 

Available Titles CALL 

MAILING CHARGE ON 

LEROYS CHEATSHEETS 

$1.00 



ORDERING & TERMS 

• VISA A Master Card - no additional charge 

• S2 50 Shipping charge - Shipping tree on orders over 
S100.IX) 

■ LEROY'S total mailing charge Sl.OQ for any quantity 
' C.O.D orders - add 51 90 extra 

• PA residents add 6* Sales Tax 

■ FPO A APO - no additional charge 

■ We try to keep our prices as low as possiWe to ssnra our 
valued customers. In order to do this wa are projocotlnj. 
credit card fraud to the lull extent ol the la* 



89 



(continued from page 21) 



mm 



m 



CHESSMATE 
Dark Horse 
Box 36162 
Greensboro NC 27416 



PTpy pT^ 



^^Tt 



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Chessmate is a respectable chess 
program which is written in ABasiC 
(you will need your Extras disk), and 
has a fair assortment of features and 
play levels. If it were the only chess 
program available, it would be easy to 
recommend. Features include: 1 or 2 
players, synthetic speech options, 
manual board settup, 3-D view (shown), 
seven difficulty levels, computer- 
suggested moves, and saving of games. 
Colors are fixed (boo). Response times 
range from .5 seconds (easiest level) to 
1 hour. The only reason not to buy 
Chessmate is pictured to its right.-BD 



i ^ 



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CHESSMASTER 2000 
Electronic Arts / 

Software Toolworks 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo, CA 94404 



^S^fsSs^ 



-kick-kic 



tm 



-■''--\'' 



This is the definitive chess program for 
the AMIGA, and (like a good physical 
chess set) is a pleasure to look at and 
'handle' as well. Absolutely loaded 
with options including: user-variable 
colors, chess clock game analysis, 
speech, music, board coordinates, set- 
ups, takebacks, replay, 2D or 3D 
display, suggest moves, and lots more. 
Response times from 5 seconds to 700 
hours depending on play depth. Mv 
favorite feature is the teaching mode 
which shows all of the legal squares a 
piece can move to or capture on by 
simply touching the piece. -BD 



tmmm 



jg^iniij^^ 



MiliiiiiiiiililiiJiiiil 



DIABLO 

Classic Image 

510 Rhode Island Ave. 

Cherry Hill NJ 08002 



mM^iaiM 



••••+ 



l^iigiijiygglilgiliiilllg^liyjljl,! 



This game is very simple, really. You 
slide pieces of track in front of a 
moving ball, and as it passes over a 
section of track, the track disappears. 
You just have to keep the ball rolling 
until all the track is gone. The graphics 
are simple but effective, the souncf and 
music are very nice, and the mouse 
interface is easy to use. It's also so 
maddeningly addictive that it could 
earn you a one-way ticket to the 
tunny farm, I spent about 1000 hours 
researching' Diablo for this review. I 
didn t mean to. It's aptly named. -MB 



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mmmimiimm 



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^^in4r+ 



QUINTETTE 

Miles Computing 

7741 Alabama Ave. Suite 2 

Canoga Park CA 91304 

This computerized boardgame is verv 
similar to Pente. Placing five stones in 
a row or, capturing fivf paLs of vou? 
opponent's stones wins the game ^^our 

and^i/'U^P^^^'^* ^^ verv^com'peTent^ 
ana it took me a counle of HnV^n 

iePault'^'ftr ' '^H^-"'^ ^o%\t% tt\Z 
aeiault Intermediate J level llk^ 

vrv'^'^lono'^'^'-^' '^^ ^''^^'' l^els take a 
very long time to make a move 

iVme'^'^K^ at the highest level!) This 
game is enhanced^ by excellent 
graphics, very nice sound effects and 
rots of options. Very addictfve ''-MB 



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MARBLE MADNESS 
Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
Son Mateo, CA 94404 

A totally faithful adaptation of the 
very popular (Atari!) arcade game. One 
or two players attempt to negotiate the 
outrageous mazes and traps which lurk 
upon the marbles' path (I especially like 
the Hoovers). The only problem with 
MARBLE, IS that without the inhibiting 
effect of the coin slot, you will 
eventually master the mazes, and have 
to find something to do with the rest of 
your life (tho I have heard there is a 
hidden screen). Our only hope is that 
someone, somewhere, may be working 



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SHANGHAI 

Activision 

2350 Bayshore Frontage Rd, 

Mountain View, CA 94043 

This game ought to be illegal. It is 
impossible to play 'just one game' 
Based on the ancient oriental game of 
Mah-Jongg, _ play is swift and 
deceptivefy simple; the deeper into the 
game you get, the more strategy is 
needed. A variety of single, multi- 
P'ayfJ-.i'nd Pre-designed layouts are 
available. The graphics are 3-D, with 
the layers of tiles indicated by the 
shadows they cast. If you can manage 

Hl^rf'i.i^^fu^^"'^ ^^ removing all tfie 
iiies irom tne screen you get a surnri<:f> 
Pl?n on spending a l!oT^of ?ime ^wfth 
mis one, -TisA 




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••••• 



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FLIGHT SIMULATOR II 

SubLogic 

713 Edgebrook Dr. 

Champaign, IL 61820 

This computer gaming legend reaches 
its finest incarnation in the long- 
awaited AMIGA version. The graphics 
are superb (as you might expect), with 
multiple, sizeable zoom windows for 
simultaneous views from a variety of 
perspectives. Fly either a Cessna 182, 
or a Learjet 25g. Fly in real-time thru 
a detailed world (10,000 by 10,000 miles 
with a .01 inch resolution!) and buzz 
familiar landmarks in major cities. 
Multi-player feature supports flying in 
shared air space (requires 2nd computer 
and cables). BEGIN your game 
collection with this one! -BD 



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DEFENDER OF THE CROWN 
Mindscape/Cinemaware 
3444 Dundee Rd. 
Northbrook IL 60062 



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This game's graphics have set new 
standards for computer games. The 
detail, color, and animation in this two- 
disk graphic adventure are 
breathtaking, and the music is 
impressive. The gameplay, while 
adequate, is the weak link in this 
game. It is just not as involved or 
varied as other games involving the 
taking and holdine of territory. This is 
only the first in the Cinemaware series 
of 'interactive movies', and we hope 
that future releases will uphold the 
high graphics standards set here while 
providing deeper gameplay. -MB 



■^•'-^"•■^":^' 



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STAR FLEET I 
Electronic Arts/Interstel 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo CA 94404 



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played public domain 
:star Trek you've played 



If you've 

versions of ;,rar ireK yc _ 

Star Fleet I. You'll find the'faVitilTr 

warping around galactic quadrants 

with "®nh.U''" (Kyellan?) spaceships 

with phasers and torpedoes The 

graphics are restricted to gridmaps 

^nliff l'?^'°"\^"^ son^e simple ship 
representations. It looks like it wa^ 
ported Jock, stock, and lack of 
imagination directly from the IBM-PC 

with an ll-page book et containing 
^I"tsa changes! If you have a PD Star 
Trek, you don't need this. -mb 



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SUPER HUEY 

Cosmi 

415 N. Figueroa St. 

Wilmington, CA 90744 



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Playing Super Huey made me wish that 
SubLogic would hurry up with their 
own helicopter simulation. Cosmi's 
flight simulator has plenty of detail and 
thought behind it, but it just doesn't 
come together. The thing that really 
spoils this game for me is the hokey 
animation : those flat 'cutout' symbols 
(pictured right) sliding by are as phony- 
looking as an Atari ad, and are a real 
waste of the AMIGA'S abilities. 
Everything else is pretty standard 
except the documentation, which is 
weak and minimally illustrated. Save 
your $$- better things are coming. -BD 



MiilliiitilititfriiiiUiB 



■kMHiMW 



THE PAWN 

Firebird 

74 N. Central Ave. 

Ramsey NJ 0744S 



^MUadiilUi 



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tmmm 



This is an innovative game in many 
ways. The excellent graphics screens 
are on pull-down windows so you can 
scroll them up out of the way if you 
want to. The parser is capable of 
understanding the subtleties of English 
far better than other adventure games, 
though it is still stumped by the 
unexpected. The music is some of the 
best we've heard on the Amiga, but it 
would be nice to have it play during 
the game as well as during the title 
screen. The Pawn's story is good, the 
characters are interesting, and the play 
IS entertaining. You'll like it. -MB 



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MIND WALKER 

Commodore 

1200 Wilson Dr. 

West Chester PA 19380 

In Mindwalker you are trying to 
e^n^?*' together the shards of your own 
sanity You function as four separate 
individual personalities, and the 
landscape you travel is your own mind 
(Mindwalker: get it?) Anyway the 
graphics are good, the music an/sound 
are excellent, and the gameplay is 
complex through all three ^levefi don't 
ry to play this game without reading 
the manual. My only obiectinn tn 
Mindwalker is tliat you pliy w"th a 
^ystick and a mouse similt^aneously 

fiive TtJr.l''' ^'^^ Mindwalker at firs^i 
give It time. -MB 



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EXODUS: ULTIMA III 
Origin Syetema 
340 Harvey Rd. 
Manchester NH 03103 



[ffil?®fliiJ3l] 



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The sound is excellent and gameplay is 
very good in the latest from Lord 
British. This got 5 stars on the C64, 
but the graphics and user interface 
could have been better Amiga-tized in 
this version. Gameplay uses a 
combination of keyboard and mouse 
sans pull-down menus. There are 
monsters and treasures galore, but 
Ultima is geared towards dedicated 
D&D gamer types; if that's not you, 
you may be overwhelmed. The _ 3 
manuals cover all the game's high 
points, and you will spend many happy 
hours discovering the details. -MB 



J.>;^.;.4^>^-a.>a.i.i..^»Mjjoaaa^tt^fMi-t 



MEAN 18 

Accolade 

20863 Stevens Creek Blvd. 

Cupertino, CA 95014 



MHHtl 



Mffm'sMl 



•••• 



ititmttitrr '^--' ■^■•"-'■^ 



If you're a golfer, you'll like Mean 18. 
It offers real courses, including Pebble 
Beach and St. Andrews, has realistic 
(digitized) sound and good play action 
based on a triple mouse-click system. 
The game has some nice touches, like a 
practice green, a driving range, and 
even an option to design your own 
course. The greens are a little hard to 
read. It is slowed down by a lot of 
extra mouse-clicks, and suffers from 
blocky IBM-style graphics. Complete 
Amigatization would solve a lot of the 
problems with the program and make it 
nearly unbeatable. Fore! -TM 



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.i,-^^.^^::^^^^-.,,:^.^..^^^^,:.^^^^;.:^^ ;- 



BRIDGE 4.0 
Artworx, Inc. 
1844 Penfield Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 



.^^^:^^^^^..^.Xi.:uL:,:.^. 



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Behind this program is a good concept 
and a mean play algorithm. Bidding is 
competent and by the book, if 
somewhat limited in scope. It gives you 
the option of having opening points for 
every hand. Bridge 4.0 plays the hand 
well and aggressively (but I did manage 
a couple of nice finesses). All plav is 
H]'ti?'°"rf ^"^ '^''W'^ "^e speeded up a 
fli^ri u.!ii t^H° employs optional speech 
and will tell you in no uncertain terms 
if vou renege. Hands can be re-bid 
repfayed, claimed, or conceded. Scori^ng 
IS on a real scoresheet, unusual an<? 
welcome for computer bridge -TM 



iimmiMamiammmma 



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TEMPLE OF APSHAI 

Epyx 

600 Galveston Dr. 

Redwood City CA 94063 



dJilPtD^ji'Ml 



'Ar*^T*r+ 



The entire Temple of Apshai trilogy is 
included on a single Amiga disk. 
Apshai has been admirably Amiga- 
tized. The graphics are colorful with a 
nice 3D shaded effect, the music and 
sound effects are top-notch, and the 
highly intuitive user interface makes 
full use of the mouse and pull-down 
menus. You hardly ever need to touch 
the keyboard. There are lots of extra 
touches like the head-bobbing 
animation of your player character, 
and the nice snadine and borders on 
the transaction windows. More likely 
to appeal to novices than Ultima. -MB 



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LEADER BOARD 

Access Software 
2561 S. 1560 West 
Woods CrOBS, UT 84087 



(IrlptDKiiiMI 



Mrninnrrliirn'— "■•-'•^- '■'"■■ -Y 



Nicely done graphics are what make 
this golf simuFation worthwhile. Up to 
four golfers can play four different 
purely imaginary courses. Play action 
(using a doublemouse-click) is good, and 
very difficult to master at the pro level, 
just like the real thing. The view 
changes automatically to your next shot 
and reorients toward the pin. Club 
selection must be made for every shot. 
A driving range is included, but no 
practice green, nor is there a course 
construction function. Any duffer will 
find it worth a look. It's tough to 
choose between this and Mean 18. -TM 



t■l;^»y^>'i-.ff■i;,jJ..:^l■l■i.MJi,l.A;J^,,;i,.^iJiil>A^.-^,;.:^ 



ilirirwiillllli'-'""-^"^""^-^''^'^-'^^^-'^"'^! 



BALANCE OF POWER 

Mindsc^pe 

3444 Dundee Rd. 

Northbrook IL 60062 



MhuUtt^MUdta 



ajn?£>^ifl3i) 



Balance of Power is about the delicate 
balance of the superpowers. The game 
IS as complex as world politics, but the 
puil-dqwn menus and popup windows 
niake it easv to play. You assume the 

L°i^iH^ ^v^ ^^u°^ ^^^ USSR and make 
world policy, then sit back and observe 
the. reactions. The manual is a 
:Sientable textbook on world politics 
Lh^ educational'. game is a lot of fun 

Mv ^L}'^ ^^^^, ^-^^ ^'^^s its job well. 
My _ one cpniplaint is the obvious 

bS''.'i^?.^^.'^^^"^"?^; '^ l^eks sound, 
°^i ^} 'PSt some nice colors have been 
added. An excellent game -mb 



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Commodore Product Potpourri 

Hardware, Software & Firmware for your C-64, C-64C, C-128, AMIGA 



256-K AMIGA' MEMORY 

/( all began S years ago when Commodore 
produced a wondrous PET Computer with 8 
Kbytes of memory. Skyles Electric Works 
then oHered to double the PET memory with 
an 8 Kbyte memory addition. 
History repeats itsell 7 years later. At 
1/3 the price of Ihe original PET memory 
expansion, Skyles Electrit; Works now offers 
32 times the memory, Thai's right!! 256 
Kbytes o( AMIGA memory expansion lor 
only $79.95', 

Buy your 25$ Kbyte AMIGA memory 
expansion from Skyles Electric Works at 
the lowest price from Ihe most reliable and 
most proven Commodore expansion 
memory builder in the world. 
2S6-K Memory for AMIGA S79.95" 



A panoramic passe/ of pelucid 
paragraphs presented by a 
premier purveyor 



MEGABYTES for AMIGA 

Available now from Skyles Electric Works. 
We had so much fun developing the 256-K 
Memory for Amiga that we decided to oHer t 
Mbyte, and 2 Mbyte, Memories for Amiga. 
Consider, 1,046,576 or 2,097,152 bytes o( 
memory designed io plug directly into the right 
side of the Amiga. Each memory board offers 
full S5 pin buffered pass-thru with Addmem or 
Auto-config on turn on. We searched America 
for the best Amiga Memory and found il. 

1 Megabyte Amiga Memory , . . . S499.95* 

2 Megabyte Amiga Memory .... S949.9S* 

MIDI for AMIGA 

A Standard MIDI IN, 2 MIDI OUT, and MIDI 
THRU Interface for the Amiga Computer. 
Plug ilmlo Ihe RS-23a Port On Ihe rear of your 
Amiga and you are ready to use Musical 
Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) instruments 
and devices with your Amiga. Designed Io be 
used with standard MIDI cables and all the 
presently available Amiga MIDI soltware. The 
MIDI for Amiga Interface gets Ihe job done 
at a bargain price. 
MIDI for Amiga Interface ....... S49.95* 

CLOCK for AMIGA 

We Were Shocked When We Discovered 

that the othenwise friendly Amiga "would not 
even give us the time of day". We immediately 
set about fixing the problem with Clock lor 
Amiga No longer is il necessary to set the 
clock via Preferences. With Clock lor Amiga 
you can have the time ol day set automatically 
each lime you turn on your Amiga. Clock for 
Amiga is a small cartridge that plugs onto the 
86 pin connector on the right side of your 
Amiga. Clock for Amiga runs for two years 
even il your Amiga is turned oil. Get Clock 
tor Amiga today and let your Amiga be an 
amiga. 
Clock tor Amiga S79,95' 

2 fori MONITOR CABLE/C128 

The 2 for 1 Monitor Cable allows all 
composite video monitors to be used with the 
Commodore 12B in all modes of operation. 
Don't throw out your present green or amber 
monitor, buy a 2 tor 1 Monitor Cable, 
2 lor 1 Monitor Cable for C-128 ,. S24.95* 




Skyles 

Electric 

Works 



1541 FLASH! 

The new Skyles Electric Works 1541 FLASH! 
loads programs and files to your Commodore 
64/64C or Commodore 128 (64 mode) three 
times faster than an unenhanced Commodore 
1541 disk drive. 1541 FLASHl saves programs 
20 to 50 percent (aster. 1 541 FLASH ! formats 
a diskette m 25 seconds, a real flash. 
The 1541 FLASH! is a permanent hardware 
installation in your Commodore 64/64C and 
Commodore 128 (64 mode) and 1541 disk 
drive. No programs to load, no cartridge hassles. 

We have special versionso(the1541FLASH! 
for the SX-64 and two 1541s. 

In addition to its blinding speed of program and 
file ioading, Ihe 1541 FLASH! adds Over 50 
extra commands tor the Commodore 
64/64C/128 user These include a built-in 
DOS.'Wedge, Easy Editor, and FLASHt^ON! 
machine ianguage monitor 

1541 FLASH! C-64/C-64C& 1541 .,. S69.9S' 
1541 FLASH! C-64/C-64C S 

two 1541s S109.95" 

C-128 FLASHl C-12S& 1541 S79.95" 

C-128 FLASH! C-12e& 

two 1541s S119.9S' 

SX-64 FLASH! SX-64 & 1541 S69.95' 

SX.64 FLASH! SX-64 & 

two 1541s $109.95* 



A powerful panoply of pertinent, 
potent, peripfierai products 



QUICKSILVER 128 

QUICKSILVER 128 our premier lEEE-ABS 
Interface for the Commodore 128 is now in 
stock and even better than we had planned. 
Quicksilver 128 offers an IEEE Interface for the 
Commodore 128 in the C-128 mode (40 or 80 
columns) and in the C-64 mode as well. 
QUICKSILVER 128 will inler-connect your 
Commodore 128 to Commodore SFD 1001, 
2031. 2040, 3040, 4040, 8050, 8250. 9060, and 
9090 Disk Drives. QUICKSILVER 128 will 
connect your Commodore 128 to Commodore 
2022, 2023, 4022. 4023 and 8023 Printers. 

QUICKSILVER 12B C-12B S119.9S" 



A priceless programmers pallett of 
practical products and programs 



IEEE Flash! 64 

IEEE Flash! 64 ourpremfei-JEE£-4BS 
Interface lor the Commodore 64 is' now in 
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Flash! 64 will inter-connect your Commodore 
64 to Commodore SFD 1001, 2031, 2040. 3040. 
4040. 8050. 8250, 9060. and 9090 Disk Drives. 
IEEE Flash! 64 will connect your Commodore 
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8023 Printers. 
IEEE Flash! 64 C-64/C-64C S99-95' 



DRUM MACHINE 

Rhythm King Is a drum mactiine tor the C-64 
and C-12B. Rhythm King is a disk and an audio 
output cartridge that plugs into your C-64 or 
C-128. Rhythm King has 8 different percussion 
sounds buill-in and Rhythm King will play up to 
3 drums at a time. You may write "patterns of up 
to 24 bars, with up to 32 notes per bar, with up to 
64 steps per note. Up to 64 different patterns 
may be linked together into a "song ", with up to 
255 repeats per pattern. Songs may be linked 
together to form "l^flegasongs ' of up to 255 
pattern steps. 

RHYTHM KING 128 C-128 S89.95' 

RHYTHM KING 64 C-64 S89.95' 



Prevent and preclude premature 
pratfalls, by perplexed pro- 
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BASIC PROGRAM 
COMPILER 

BLITZ! is the fastest, easiest to use. most 
popular, BASIC program compiler available for 
the Commodore 128, C-64, and C-64C. Your 
BLITZ! compiled programs wiil run from 5 to 20 
times faster after you SLITZ! them. BLITZ! 
translates and reduces your BASIC programs 
in to a much, much faster code. 

BLiTZ! C-128, Disk $59.95* 

BLITZ! C-64/C-64C, Disk S59.95* 

BASIC PROGRAMMING AID 

VICTREE is a BASIC programming aid cartridge 
for the VIC-20 and C-64/C;-64C computer. 
VICTREE adds 42 extra commands for BASIC 
programming ease and full DOS control. 
VICTREE commands include CHAIN, EXECUTE, 
IVIERGE, SEND, USE, CONCAT DOPEN, 
DCLOSE. RECORD, HEADER, COLLECT 
BACKUP COPY APPEND, DSAVE, DLOAD, 
DIRECTORY RENAf^E, SCRATCH, CATALOG, 
INITIALIZE, AUTO, DELETE, RENUfVIBER. 
tylERGE, LCOPY, LMOVE, PRINT USING, FIND, 
CHANGE, PAGE, HELP DUMP andTRACE, 

VICTREE 64 Cartridge, C-64/C-64C . 549.95* 
VICTREE 20 Cartridge, VIC-20 S49.9S* 

ASSEMBLER CARTRIDGE 

If your 0-64 programming needs have extended 
beyond BASIC, Skyles Electric Works now olfers 
MiKRO, a machine language assembler 
cartridge for Ihe Commodore 64/64C, The 
MiKRO cartridge contains everything you need 
for machine language programming. 

MIKRO Cartridge, C-64/C-64C S49.9S* 



The periodically puzzling, pre- 
carious, path to perspicacious 
program perfection and prowess 



INCOME TAX PROGRAM 

Taxware, Ihe most comprehensive, easy to 
use, all year around record keeping and tax 
preparation system available lor the Com- 
modore 64/64C. is now avaiiabie lor the 
Corr.modore 128. Better yet, both the improved 
C-64 and C-128 versions of this popular 
paci^age are available in one comprehensive 
package. TaxWare includes forms 1040, 2441, 
and Schedules A, B, C, D, E, G, W and SE. 
TAXWARE, C-64/C64CorC-128, 

1541/1571 S49.95 



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D0S-2-D0S Transfers MS-DOS Files 
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■ Supports single and double sided 5 25" as well as 3.5" 720KB diskettes. 

• Converts ASCII die line-ending characters snd provides Wordstar 
compatability. 

• SuppoRs full directory path names, witti wild cards in die names. 

• Allows selection of MS-DOS and AmigaDOS subdirectorv and displays 
sorted direiilory listing 

• Formats 3,5" and 5.25" MS-DOS diskettes. 

• Provides duplicate file name deteclion wilti query/replace options. 

■ Provides TYPE and DELETE commands 

• Permits renaming of files where tile name restrictions occur. 

■ Remains resident to permit AmigaDOS disk swapping. 

Requires standard Amiga wth either an external 5,25" or 3.5" disl( (irive. 
This product is available for immediate sfiipment. Only S55 00 pius 
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=5 







Your Resource to the Commodore Amiga™ 

Since our Premiere issue in February 1986, every 
issue of Amazing Computing™ lias been 
dedicated to the Amiga™ user. Amazing 
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tutorials, and more to help the Amiga users expand 
the possibilities of their machine. 

Amazing Computing™ is a monthly publication for 
both the new and advanced user. Hardware 
projects and actual working programs are listed and 
carefully documented. 

Amazing Computing™ has also made the AC 
program listings available in the Public Domain 
AMICUS™ disks. Both AMICUS™ and Fred Fish™ 
Public Domain Software Disks are available 
through AC to Subscribers and non-subscribers. 

If you are searching for technical information on the 
Amiga thai is both current and understandable, 
then be Amazed with the pioneer Amiga 
magazine, Amazing Computing™. 

Amazing Computing™ 

12 Informative Issues: 
$24.00 U.S.A. 
$30.00 Canada and Mexico 
$35.00 Overseas 

First Glass Rates available on request. 

Back Issues are available at $4.00 each. 

Current Available Public Domain Software: 

AMICUS™ (Disks 1 to 14) 

Fred Fish PDS (Disks 1 to 40) 

Subscribers $6.00 each 

Non-Subscribers $7.00 each 

Public Domain Catalog $1 .00 

Mail all orders to: 
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P.O.Box 869 
Fall River, MA 02722 

Check or money order in US funds on US bank 

Dealer and Advertisers inquiries, please call: 
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CLASSIC lilAGE, INC.- PRESENTS 

DIABLO - Graphic mind challenge gane 529.95 

DISK LIBRARY - Now you can File, Catalog, Update 
Search, Cross Reference, Raport 549.95 

DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



Amigai) System Covers - W/mouse/LtKil) 521,95 

Amiga© Disk Cover - lOiO or 1020 with LOGO S7.99 

Paper T/F-F/F l^hite, 9*5 x 11, 201b. 1O00/J17.99 
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Index Cards - T/F-F/F, 3x5 500/57.95 

Rolodex Cards - T/F-F/F, 2 1/6x4 500/58.95 

Labels - T/F-F/F. Address, 3>ixl5/]6 1000/55.95 



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510 Rhode Island Ave. 
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for tast delivery. 



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Send for FREE CATALOS * All available AHiGA"'items 
AUG 6300 members - Just give us your membership number and 
deduct 10% off of all purchases. 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS - Let us take over the headaches of 
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Join the largest users' group dedicated to the Amiga. You 
wil receive our official newsletter. Evaluations on 
software and hardware. Advanced updatings, technical 
information. Problem-solving, program exchange (over 50 
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Send SIS. 00 US for Membership to; «"ice, eic. 

AMIGA USERS' GROUP 68000 
Box 3761 - Attn: Jay Forman 
Cherry Hi 1 1 , NJ 08034 
(609) 657-2526 * Visa/Haster - Add 51.00 



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uxe 



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TEACHES YOU HOW TO CREATE 
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QUINTETTE.™ 
A Timeless Game 
of Skill and Tactics. 

If you think good entertainment is hard 
to find in the 20th Century, imagine 
the plight of those in ancient China 
some four milleniums ago. Tending a 
heard of yaks loses its fascination pretty 
fast. Climbing Mt. Everest was definitely 
out of the question. And Peking — the 
nearest hot spot — wasn't exactly a 
stone's throw away. 

So being the clever people that they 
were, the ancient Chinese de- 
veloped a game to pass the 
time and enrich the mind — a 
game we now call Quintette. 



NOW OUINTETTE'S 
AVAILABLE ON AMIGA. 



I 




The premise is simple and easy to 
learn: align five stones in a row, or 
capture five pair of your opponent's. 
The strategies, however, are challenging 
and complex; will your adversary lure 
you into capturing yourself? Or will they 
go for broke, allowing you to snatch 
victory from defeat? The outcomes are 
infinite and the process thoroughly 
absorbing, as Quintette is playable in 
pairs, teams, or against the com- 
puter itself. 

Since that day many 
thousands of years ago, 
Quintette has traveled 



'round the globe, entertaining millions of 
people along the way. And now, thanks 
to Miles Computing, you can share the 
intrigue on modem man's most vivid 
game board, AMIGA. 
We think Confucius would be proud. 




Miks ahead of the pack. 

Miles Computing, Inc. 

774 1 Alabama Avenue, Suite 2 
Canoga Park, CA 9 1 304 • {8 1 B) 341-1411 



Ouiotette is a reeisteied trademark of Miles Computing, Inc. 




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Call: 
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1333 HOWE AVENUE SUITE 208 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 95825 

Amiga trodemoftc of 
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Deoler Inquiries invttad. 




Talking W)rd Processor 



Tcilker does everything you'd 
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So, Talker is great for 
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S69.96 

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order risk free, your .satisfaction is guaranteed. 

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Shrink In A Box 



A delailoi psychotiieniiKutic 
game on a disk. Dr Xes laJies ilie 
form of a Gestalt ttierapj- session, 
l^-am more about artifical 
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your»lf. Dr Xes even tiilks. More 
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Call collect to learn more 
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; F T w A n t 



400(1 .MaciVrthur lilvd. Suite .i(XX) 
Hewpofl Beach, California 92663 




We Teach Your Computer Spanish. 
It Teaches You. 



Senor Tbtor leads a begin- 
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self-paced, changing lessons. 
Von learn greetinj;s and 
phrases, household terms, 
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Sophisticated speech 
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'him your computer into 
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-iOOO MacArtiiur Blvd. Suite 30O0 
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ACCESS 



Fof msjl oriJer. enclose check 
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^y phone on 
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ay cillingieOII 298-9077. 

ACCESS SOFTWARE. INC. 

2561 Souih 1560 West 
Woodi Cross, UI 84087 



LEADER BOAltD is 

the mo5t realistic golf 
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INFO UNCLASSIFIED ADS 



' AMIGA & C64 SOFTWARE 

Latest public domain software including Games, Utilities, Graphics, Sound 
and much more. For catalog send SASE and indicate machine. MCA, Box 
5533, Katy, TX 77491. 

AMIGA OWNERS 

Choose from the best selection of Amiga Public Domain software available. 
Over 700 progran^e on over 40 disks to pick from! Entertainment, Home, 
Business, Utilities, Educational, more! And each disk full is only $5.95! 
WOW! Send busineaa size SASE for catalog. Amware, P.O. Box 19474 
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C64-VIC-2n Sfvffwarp 

We have the lowest prices because we sell it USED! Visa/MC. FREE 
CATALOG! MGH software, Box 645, Bayfield. WI 54814 (715)-779-S600. 

Public Domain. Inc. is Closed 

HOWEVER, George Ewing, former V.P., is continuing to distribute all 
products. OLD CATALOG PRICES will be honored. C64 Catalog including 
PDI manual on Disk J5.00, SPECIAL : ALL 20 C64 Collections (over 
600 programs!!) on DISK - a $200 value only $75 + $5 s/h ORDER 
FROM: EWING ENTERPRIZES, P.O. Box 415, TROY. OH 45373. Phone 
(513)339-1725. Need Tapes, PET or VIC-20 Software call. 

TRICLOPS TNVA.STON 7 n 

AMIGA owners. Create your own space cruisers, jets, tanks, and cities. 
tnjoy this amaimg 3D space game! Telecommunicating TWO player mode! 
Fast graphics source code included. Send $27 to Geodesic Publications, 
P.O. Box 7, Wtilow Creek, CA 95S73. (916)629-2514 Californians add 6% 



ADVERTISER INDEX 

104 Access Software 

105 Aegis Development 

79 Briwall 

77 Cardinal Software 

99 Central Coast Software 

74 Clinical Interviews 

6 CompuServe 

96 Computer Best 

78 Computer Mart 

74 Computer Swap Commodore Show 

8 Datasoft 
100 Deluxe Help 

102 Digital Creations 
C2 Digital Solutions 

3 Digital Solutions 

73 Digital Vision 

100 Earthbound Software 

7 Electronic Arts 

9 Electronic Arts 

85 Enlightenment 

103 Finally Software 

89 Floppy House Software 

99 Gronert Computers 

76 In Con Trol 

55 INFO ErgBoard/Ergcards 

71 INFO Back Issues/Subscriptions 

82 Inkwell Systems 

74 Innovative Computer Accessories 

80 Jason-Ranheim 

73 Lincoln College Computer Camp 

98 Microcomputer Services 

80 MicroCube Corp, 
C4 MicroIUusions 

76 Micro R&D 

73 Micro-W 

79 Midnite Press 

77 Midwest Software 

101 Miles Computing 

83 Mountain Wizardry Software 
100 M.W. Ruth Co. 

106 NewTek 
C3 NewTek 

74 Performance Peripherals 

99 Pirn Publications 

78 Precision Peripherals 
10 Prism Software 

86 Protecto 

87 Protecto 

100 Redmond Cable 

81 Signal Computer Consultants 

97 Skyles Electric Works 

81 Software Investments Plus 

84 Software Link 

76 S.O.G.W.A.P. Software 

77 Superior Micro Systems 

88 Tenex Computer Express 

75 Tensoft 

80 Touchstone 
73 Ultrabyte 

104 Unclassified Ads 
75 Vision Software 
77 WallStreet Corp. 
75 Xetec 



■ilLiim.1.1 




AEGIS brings Desktop 
Video to the AMIGA! 



Introducing a line of graphic 
programs that make computer design 
and animation truly affordable. 
Impact™ 

Impact creates business presentation 
graphics with finesse. Pie charts, bar 
graphs, icons, plots, and trends 
combined with a structured drawing 
system give you the visual edge to 
get your point across. Use Impact 
to produce rolling slide shows for 
trade show presentations, or to 
enhance verbal reports. The graphs 
and slides can he printed for use in 
written reports. 
Aegis Animator'" 
A full feature meiamorphic animation 
system. Use Animator to put your 
ideas in motion. Aegis Animator 
combines Ccis, Morphed Objects, 3-D 
manipulations, and color cycling to 
create the best looliing Desktop 
Videos anywhere! Create storyboards, 
enhance grapliical presentations, or 
experiment with visual effects before 
committing them to traditional 
amination methods. Use paintings 
with Aegis Images, Graphicraft" or 
other paint systems to produce 
continuous demonstrations. When 
used with Genlock you can produce 



Special effects for video or animated 

titles and scrolling credits. 
Aegis Images'" 

The professional paint system for 
Amiga. Use images as a graphics 
processor to produce renderings of 
buildings, design sets and costumes 
for theatre, create layouts and 
concepts in ad\'ertising. or artwork 
for custom Amiga programs. Use it 
anywhere art and design is created 
by hand. 

When combined with Genlock, 
Images can create mats and other 
\'ideo effects. If you pass paintings 
to Aegia Atiimator]" you can create 
a rolling slide shov\' for demos or 
backgrounds and windows for 
animations. 
Aegis Draw Plus'" 
Aegis Draw Plus is the New advanced 
big brother to Aegis Draw. It turns 
your Amiga into a low cost, powerful 
CAD Workstation. Aegis Draw Plus 
includes multiple drawing resolutions 
(640x200 & 640x400), Extensive 
Plotter Support, High Quality 
Printing, Nhilti-Tusking. .Multi-Window 
& Multi-Drawing support, Display of 
Numerical units or Feet/Inches/Fractions 
(entry & display), Rotation and 

r.'.iimiu, >od Cimm touno. Sonv Cmp ■ DlBliijir t..un«y a' SvMcms ■ 



resizing of text, Dynamic Automatic 
Dimensioning (Associative). Parts 
Libraries. Mirroring, Arrays (linear, 
circular, & combinations), On-Screen 
Numerical Display (coordinates, 
lengths, angles, 'tool-in-use! status), 
Zoom, Metamorphic 'Hook! Multiple 
Layers with Multiple Colors Per Layer 
and much more. Combined with the 
standard features found in Aegis Draw, 
Aegis Draw Plus offers the most 
power for the smallest price. Use Aegis 
Draw I'tus to create architectural 
plots, floor plans, "what-if" space 
plans, organizational charts, and 
anything else your creativity can think 
off (NOT1-,: This is not Aegis Pro- 
Draw!" Aegis Pro-Draw is a high le\'el 
3-D system available in 198") 



Aegis Development - 
The number 1 choice in 
graphic software. 



^ 




DEVELOPMENT 

Santa Monica, California 

Hiril Disk ajurlc5y Tctmar. Inf. ■ .Modem tourKsy RacjL Vidic. inc. 



.V-tufll unrelouchud pholoi 



brings the world into your Amiga! 




With Digi-View and a viduo camera, 



your Amiga can see! Faces, logos, 

ai'tu'ork . . . anything you can imagine! 
HB I ..^ Simply p(.)int your camera and click the 

^ i _ . "~~ moLiSc. In seconds, whatever the camera sees 
is painlessly transformed into a computer 
image that can be printed, stored on disk, or 
transferred to other programs. Imagine how quickly and easily >t)u 
can generate stunning video art and animation when you start with 
high quality digiti/ied photographs or artwork. 



Sophisticated software included with Digi-View makes it easy 
to produce dazzling, broadceist-quality color images. Intuitive, 
on-screen controls are as easy to use as the knobs on your T.\'. set. 
Digi-View can capture images 
in several modes, including 
,"320x200 pixels with up to 
4096 colors on screen ("hold- 
and-modify" mode), and the 
incredibly detailed 640x40(1 
high re.solution mode. 




Tlh- Ai'.i/ III Digi- 
View 's hKTcdihii: 
C'lhrrcsiiluliim is 
this C'linr Si-'para- 
lion iilkr irhic/i 
alkidics III !)'iw 
hliick-iiiid-uliik' 
or aihir lick'o ] 
(.iiincra. ' 



• IFF disk format wurks with Digi-Paint''', Deluxcl^aint'", DeluxeVideo'", DeluxePrint, .Aegis hnages"', .Aegis .Animator, and more! 

• Saves time! No more hours of freehand drawing and redrawing. 

• Send photos over the telephone with your modem and terminal software. 

• Capture images for scientific image processing or pattern recognition. 

• Spice up business graphics — slide show program included. 

• Incorporate photos in posters and greeting cards, 

• Use Digi-View pictures in your B.ASiC programs. 

• Catalog images with IFl' database pnjgrams. 

• Make red/blue 3D photos. 

• A powerful tool for commercial graphic artists! 



Panasonic W\-]410 video ccimc-ra ufluns , S28(l 

CS-IL Copy stand w/lighLs S 75 




Only 



$199.95 

cdkiT separation Jlltcr. Si)ftv,ari: and manual 

Orders Only (800( 358-.3079 ext. .342 
Customer Service (9131 :}54-9;},32 

N=wT=K 

INCORPORATED 



.^mto is :, tradcnuirk d Comra«l„re-.^mi)ti, Inc. I iis-V:^.^ and Diffi-I^in! are Imdemarks of K.-viTA Inc IM 
trademarks ol Aa0s Deveiopmcnt. Ino. 

■ !).SI-Vjeu. «,fh,^„ „^on 2,0 ,o, n„«, r„„,a-d to use culnr camera. Fur ,.a.vimun, res„i„n„n u,r 

© 1986 NwTek. Inc, 



701 Jackson • Suite 133 • Topeka. KS • 66602 

Imd'r.int, IJduxL-\'iJe.,. and Dduxd'rint .ire tr=d™arta iif Electronic .Arts. 



s. Inc. .Aejis Images and Aegis Ariirnatrjr are 
mnr,„cl,ror,e camera «.l, 2. 1 inlerlace. Hifih-^ colnr m«lc.s rc^uin.- I M,g e.vpans,an KA.M. 




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(3) FOLD FLAP HERE. 





PO BOX 2300 

Iowa City, I A 52244 



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•fqinal dame Jesiqn oy /lark uro 



INFO MRNIfl 

Gameboard and playing pieces 

Copyright © I'^fe INFO Publications Inc. 

This srane board Is HOT copy-protected 
and orisrinal purohasers are authorized 
to nake archiual photocopies of this 
board and £ra»epieoes for their personal 
use. Unauthorized copyinsr and 
distribution of this sane nay result in 
sleeplessness, dizziness. uonitinsr« and 
premature loss of hair. Pirates beware* 



lAnother na^raztne 
prints your "tip". 
Mo points, but you 
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a quarterly profit 
Take Player's card. 



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IHFO prints your 
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The 4096 Colpr*Paint Pro 
for the Arnica" 






Create original art with a palette of 4096 colors. 



Load H.AM images from Digi-VieuF" or 32 color images from 
DeluxePaint™ and other IFF programs. 



From the creators of Digi-Vicw comes Digi-Paint, the first paint program to take 
full advantage of the Amiga's exclusive "hold-and-modify" mode. No longer are 
you limited to 32 colors. With Digi-Paint, you can use al! 4096 colors on screen 
simultaneously. Features include brushes, smooth shading, magnify, cut & paste, 
output to printer, and full IFF load and save. Digi-Paint was programmed 
completely in assembly language for the fastest possible response. Give your 
Amiga the graphics power of systems costing thousands of dollars more. See your 
Amiga dealer today or call toll-free for Digi-Paint, the 4096 color paint program. 



Only 



$59.95 



Orders Only (800) 358-3079 ext. 342 
Customer Service (913) 354-9332 

NewTek 

INCORPORATED 

701 Jackson • Suite B3 • Topeka, KS • 66603 



Amisa is ii Irademark <pf L'ommodore-Aiinga. Inc. IJiAi-Paint and Difii-Vrew AK trademarks of NcwTtk. Inc. Dtluxt-Paiiit is a rrojnnirk uf F.leclronic Arts. Inc. 
€■ 1986 NcwTck. Inc. 



engineers, architects 
and designers are deserting 
their drafting tables for the 

precision and ease of 




THE PROVEN CAD SYSTEM FOR THE ANIGA^ 



The highly advanced and powerful 
DynamicCad Drafting System i^y Micro- 
illusions has recently emerged from 
years of successful applications as a pro- 
fessional CAD system in the aerospace 
and piping industries. Combined with 
the Commodore Amiga, the most 
dynamic and versatile microcomputer 
on the market today, DynamicCad is 
revolutionizing the work methods of 
countless engineers and architects. 
DynamicCad's time and money-saving 
applications for these highpowered pro- 
fessionals is truly astounding. Here is an 
advanced, 2-D drafting system with iso- 
metric capabilities that can be combined 
with many models of plotters, printers, 
and digitizers. 

The DynamicCad software was de- 
veloped with three overridding principals 
in mind. First, it had to be 'easy to learn,' 
which resulted in DynamicCad's simple 
commands and abundant help tools. 
Mext, it had to be 'easy to use,' which was 
assured by DynamicCad's powerful tools, 



DYNAMIOCAD IS A PRODaCT OF 




simple commands, and mouse menu 
functions, which combine to make the 
revising and capturing of drawings quick 
and efficient. Finally, DynamicCad had 
to provide great flexibility. This has been 



achieved by its efficiency in producing 
every type of mechanical and architec- 
tural drawing, including printed circuit 
boards, integrated circuit designs, pert 
charts, piping diagrams, and electrical 
diagrams with their associated net lists. 
With the addition of extra memory 
DynamicCad will provide you with what 
may be the fastest PC type CAD system 
available. 

Microiliusions has an excellent up- 
grade policy and any changes to the sys- 
tem software will also be made available 
to existing DynamicCad users, Upcom- 
ing features for DynamicCad include a 
hierarchical data base which will allow 
for increased flexibility for underlying 
relevant information on library parts. 
Mew libraries will be added, and addi- 
tional plotter and printer drivers. Cur- 
rently Microiliusions is writing a template 
for use on most digitizers. As the capabil- 
ities of DynamicCad expand ournewslet- 
ter will help you keep pace with the 
technology and grow along with it. 




^//// 



INQUIRIES TEL. (818) 360-3715 



P. O. BOX 3475, GRANADA HILLS, CA 91344 



OYNAMICCflD SYSTEM FEATURES: 

DC Automatically configures itself to 

support additionaf memory 

Supports most printers and plotters 

Supports fiard disk systems 

DC is not copy protected 

DC supplies online tielp 

Screen resolutions of 640 x 400 and 

640 X 200 modes 

Both keyboard and mouse functions 



Extensive symbol library 
Alphanumerics: left, rigtit, center, 
tiorizontal, vertical, varied angle 
Multiple line possibilities wttti varied 
arcs and degrees 
Horizontal & verticle doglegs 
Automatic line dimensioning in U.S. 
standard, metric or neither 
Gives X Y coordinates 
Create own pseudo symbols 



Arcs and circles 

Editing commands to move, delete 

and search 

Enter, rotate, change size or delete 

pseudos 

Group functions to manipulate, 

delete, step and repeat, move, etc. 

Fill and cross hatch capabilities 

Zoom and move elements around, 

resizing and repositioning 



Creates automatic schematics 
Creates net lists from electronic 
drawing or schematic 
Parameter settings include window 
size, percent of viewing area, alpha- 
numeric ratios, 8.192 level selections, 
adjustable grid sizes, third line 
showing, grid set and overlay, line 
snap, alpha size, off screen display 
Can capture pictures in IFF format 



AMIGA IS A TRADEMARK OF COMMODORE BUSINESS MACHINES LTD